36

The $3000 cleanup was never a thing. It's an urban myth created from a political slander. The goal of the slander was to resist CFLs at any cost, both to resist government regulation generally, and efficiency due to its association with climate change. This also tied into 50 years of activism to reduce mercury in the environment. The fact is, if the ...


11

the epa says you can put it in the trash Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash. https://www.epa.gov/...


8

Here's the math to show that a few broken fluorescent bulbs don't pose a significant mercury hazard, and that you should clean it up the same as any other broken glass. A CFL contains 5 mg of mercury vapor, less for new models. Unless you plan on eating the broken glass, the primary exposure pathway is inhalation. Adults breathe about 8 liters per minute ...


6

It won't work right. It will overdrive the tube (or underdrive the tube) and you'd get short tube life. It may flicker horribly. It may not be able to strike. Basically the same things that will happen if you put T12 tubes in a T8-ballasted fixture. It's basically a dumb thing to do. If you got a wrong thing, take it back and get the right thing. ...


5

Don't say what shouldn't be in there, say what should. "Direct-wire LED tubes only" I put the sticker directly behind (above) the tube so it hides the sticker. I would place it near the lampholder which has the 120V on it, if that's a factor. Then on the endcap of the fixture, at the power cord end, "Ballast removed. Direct wired for LED." If the ...


5

The bottom two are bi-pin fluorescent tubes. There are two types of bi-pin socket you will encounter on straight tube T5, T8 and T12 fluorescent lights. This type requires 90 degree rotation. Removal can be a real pain the first time you do it as the pins can weld to the brass contacts and you will end up breaking the socket if you get rough with them. I ...


5

The second option but instead of landfill, take it to your local recycling facility (UK: household waste recycling centre) and put it in the "fluorescent light tubes" section.


4

That's not how it works. Unlike incandescent bulbs, florescent bulbs do not draw a particular amount of power - they are rated to handle a particular amount of power. They are actually "negative resistance" devices - which basically means they will draw an infinite amount of power if you let them. (Specifically: The more current that goes into them the ...


4

That component is called the starter. its a really inexpensive component that regulary fails on florescent lights. to remove you turn 1/4 rotations left and pull out. to check that its in turn right until it stops whilst pressing. Any good lighting store will have replacement starters for your light. Otherwise the things to check would be. check that ...


4

It's the ballast When old magnetic ballasts go bad, that's one of the things they do. I swear, I'm about ready to stick a logbook inside every fixture because I think most of our bulb replacements are in the same 5 fixtures. Decide which type of bulb you want going forward (T12 vs T8) then buy an appropriate electronic ballast. If you want to play ...


4

Direct wire. Worst case you have to change a lampholder. Plug-n-play doesn't allow a ballast, it requires a ballast! And of a specific type - if the fixture has the wrong type, you would have the ignominious task of buying a new ballast and also possibly change lampholders too. It's one more thing to maintain.


4

That style has electronic ballasts (as opposed to magnetic) integrated into the fixture ends and will not be easily converted (if it can be converted at all). They are very inexpensive low-end type fixtures and are meant to be thrown away rather than repaired when something goes wrong. IMO that fixture is not worth converting, just get a whole new modern ...


4

Ok it sounds like you are in the USA: Here is a wonderful article from https://www.epa.gov/cfl/cleaning-broken-cfl Abbreviated info: Sweep it up , not vacuum, seal it up - if your local government requires florescent bulbs (broken or not) to be taken to Household Hazardous Waste do so - otherwise throw in the trash (You might consider HHW regardless). ...


4

I personally have done this with a Greenlee clamp meter, a volt-meter with a Hz setting. I connected the meter to the terminals at the non-shunted end. Only do this with a Cat II or higher rated meter and only after the light has lit. Otherwise the meter will be subjected to the ignition voltage of near 1kV. I rather liked the high-frequency ballasts that I ...


4

You just need a t5 tombstone, that looks like a tall one measure it and places like 1000 bulbs.com or other places have them, depending on quanties for less than a buck. Just make sure if shunted or non shunted you get the correct type, if you get non shunted you can always add a jumper if needed.


4

T5 lamps are usually 54W while T8 lamps are 32W. The ballast's job is to establish the arc then keep the lamp running at the proper level. T5 lamps are shorter so the initial arc may not work well with a t8 lamp, but the problem will be the T5 ballast will allow too much current to flow and drastically shorten the lamp life, possibly causing the lamp to ...


3

You identify the tube type, then the ballast. The fixture decides the tube The fixture and its lampholders are going to decide the size of tube you can use. Within that, you may have some flexibility. Start by looking at the fixture. Look at the length and shape of tube, and the lampholder sockets. Often, it's totally obvious, like the ubiquitous 48" ...


3

Extension cords are not supposed to be used for permanent fixtures. These fixtures are supposed to be hard wired or directly plugged into a permanent outlet. A common approach to solve this problem would be to install a switched outlet on the ceiling near the fluorescent lights. In many jurisdictions, you could use non-metallic cable to run the outlet and ...


3

LEDs are not susceptible to the sorts of startup flickering that affect fluorescent tubes. However LED units are susceptible to other types of flickering caused by dimmers, smart-switches or other types of device in the circuit. Your best chance of eliminating flicker is to remove the ballasts, then fit a good quality LED fixture - ideally one that ...


3

Your ballasts are shot. It's time to upgrade one way or the other. I am all about light quality (CRI and flicker). I tinkered with LEDs but finally went with T8 real fluorescents because the quality is better. Absolutely wonderful, it's like night and day (I left the storeroom in the old tubes, the room looks horrid.) Real Fluorescent Tubes This is ...


3

The temperature will likely be printed on the bulb somewhere. Take a couple out and check, and they are all likely the same. If not, you can compare the color to an image like this: There is no "standard" for fluorescent lighting, as they come in a variety of temperatures. That said, fluorescent bulbs are more traditionally associated with the institutional ...


3

If you have a smartphone, look for an app that leverages the camera to give you color temperature. Android iOS


3

Interesting thing about being human is the brain is wired to see what it expects to see. It's hard to turn that off, even if you're a ship spotter or pilot. There is such a thing as LED bars which work both ways, either with a ballast or direct-wire. But they're a lot bolder about claiming so! The ruling word is "only" and your first interpretation is ...


3

The tombstones are defective and this is why you need to twist the bulb. The tombstones are the bulb connector mounting - I am guessing you have a Bi-Pin although single pins can have the issue they are less susceptible . You can replace the tombstones, however the price you will pay for the replacement parts and the time to replace them might not make it ...


3

The stock sizes of 4' bulb are F40T12 and F32T8. T8s are relatively new. Both make about the same light, the T8 is more efficient. So when they talk about F40, without any further commentary, and particulary when the unit is older, they mean F40T12.


3

Keep that is the guess of some yo-yo's on a discussion forum, and even though it's an electrician forum, fluorescent internals are not really their bailiwick. (Being unclear on whether T8 and T12 have same pin spacing? Please.) But it's not untrue; instant-start ballasts can have some fairly impressive arcing, since they see bad contact in a tombstone as ...


3

Those aren't strip lights; that's something else. If you like your old fixtures, or don't want to deal with the ugliness of a swap, keep them. Every part of a fluorescent fixture is serviceable. If the ballasts are fried, you can just do a ballast swap. You can also convert to LED. All within the old fixture. The fixture is the expensive part, so ...


2

I gather this is generally possible, as long as bulbs draw less power than the ballast can provide Nope, you're thinking in voltage. With fluorescent tubes, you must think in current. Anything you plug into mains power must be a constant-voltage device. Heaters are, and incandescent bulbs are close enough. That's where you get the misconception. ...


2

Fluorescent fixtures can be rather tricky. With that many installed on the same circuit, what you might be seeing is an unbalanced load on the circuit, causing some of the fixtures to have full current and others, less, and quite simply a ballast, or any fluorescent will not work without full current. With the warm up times of older ballasts, combined with ...


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