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6

Some ideas to consider.............................


5

The high and low settings of the lights on your range hood are most likely not controlled by standard semiconductor triac dimming technology. Such technology is typically used where continuously variable brightness control is desired. In the case of your range hood the high setting applies the full AC waveform of the mains voltage across the light bulb. For ...


4

This is a bad idea. The maximum power rating for low voltage lights is lower than that for normal lights because no transformer is 100% efficient, so some allowance is made for that inefficiency in the specifications. In your case, those four lights draw 200 W plus whatever overhead the transformers add, so you're drawing more current than the switch is ...


3

Bulb changer head with pole and maybe small ladder...


3

These types of lights range in voltage from 6V to 120V depending on the fixture. The voltage & wattage should be stamped on the glass. These lamps usually create a large amount of heat if you install them with fingers the oil from your skin will severely reduce the bulb life. If they come in a plastic wrapper cut the end off and install the bulb only ...


3

The first linked site appears to concern itself wholly with halogen bulbs. It claims of low-voltage halogen bulbs that, "They also produce a nicer light, with warmer, brighter and more vibrant colors." The second site's entire argument for low-voltage light being better seems to rest entirely on how configurable and remote-controllable low-voltage lights ...


3

It may be a dimensional issue. Incandescent/halogen typically have a long narrow stem. CFLs put a pudgy power converter module right at the bottom. Some LEDs unnecessarily do the same since CFLs do. Often the socket proper is recessed behind a shield or something. When you're screwing in a CFL, it grabs a couple of threads then the power converter ...


2

Key difference: Halogen lights generally run from AC so this is what your transformer outputs. LED's require DC so generally yes, you will need a rectified output from your transformer. I am guessing the transformer is providing enough forward voltage on initial switch-on, but not thereafter. You may be able to add a rectifier circuit at each bulb ...


2

This question is old, but it just hit 1000 views so I thought I'd post the answer. The 12V PSUs were all at end of life, and were failing. It may have been that the 3.5W bulbs were too low power to work, but either way I ended up replacing the lot with new sockets and LEDs. If I recall these are not stepped down 12V but run off 240V so don't need ...


2

Many dimmers need a minimum wattage load to function. Four of the LEDs is 29.2W and is probably too low for the dimmer. The single remaining halogen alone is 39W (I assume it worked with the dimmer alone) so it's close. Try replacing the dimmer with one designed for LEDs.


2

You probably need to replace the power supply with one designed for LEDs. According to various web sites, some LEDs have compatibility issues with transformers designed for halogens. In particular, the power supply may have a minimum load and your all-LED setup uses too few watts: "When replacing with LED bulbs they found they had to keep at least one ...


2

Thanks to Tester101's comment on my question I learned about ceramic high temperature wire nuts. I ended up using these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0071NCSA4, for 18-14 gauge wire (the ones noted in my comment above were too large, they are for 12-10 gauge wire and didn't hold on to the wires properly). I read somewhere that halogen lights reach temperatures ...


2

Depends. What load is on the downstream side? If there's only one 50W bulb, you should be fine. Two 35Ws? Need a bigger one.


2

Unscrew the cover and you'll see 2 sets of connectors/terminals. One set for primary, one set for secondary. Connect 230V to terminals marked as primary (at the top of the picture), and the second set of terminals is for 12V AC output.


2

You have in that fixture a PAR38 halogen bulb that is working. It is a larger bulb than the PAR30. Both of these types use the same Socket Style and so can be interchanged as long as the lamp fits - typically the larger PAR 38 bulb will be available in higher wattage versions - such as your 90 Watt bulb which is way too much for a 75 Watt Max fixture. ...


2

I have seen halogen strobe prior to totally failing, I have found 2 causes one was the lamp element itself that was bouncing around causing the flickering then failure, the other failures I have found have been arcing on the contacts. Since LED's draw very little power I would install one and it will probably work, if not cleaning the fixture contacts may do ...


2

When choosing lamps, as long as the actual wattage is below the rating of the fixture, you're safe. It doesn't matter that the fixture generates a lot of light with the watts it consumes. The equivalent wattage they talk about, like where they say this 3W LED has light output equivalent to a 15W halogen, doesn't matter when selecting lamps for a fixture. ...


1

Looking at the adapter in the photo, it shows 9.6V / 11.5V ~ . This shows a AC output on the adapter with two voltage ranges. Not knowing which lamp you have and if it has a high low setting, but based on the three wires and the adapter it looks like you need a dual voltage AC output adapter. Then all three wires will be used and the lamp will function ...


1

You have probably replaced a regulated power supply (this creates a constant 12V) with an unregulated one (which supplies 12V on average, but the actual level fluctuates). Or the power rating of the new transformer is too low. You need a regulated power supply that can supply not just the right voltage (V) but also enough power (W).


1

The terminals are behind the panel secured by the screw on the far left. This device does not have the UL (Underwriters Laboratories) nor CSA (Canadian Standards Assoc.) mark. But it does have the CE mark. That suggests the European market. European power is supplied in one or more 230V phases, plus a neutral. It is 230V between a phase and neutral....


1

A 42W bulb is only going to produce 42 Watts of heat (well, a little less since some of the energy escapes as light (roughly 3 - 5% for a halogen)). So as long as the fixture is rated for at least 42 watts, that bulb will be fine. The max wattage limit should be noted on the fixture somewhere, either on a sticker, or embossed in the metal. I think your ...


1

I've replaced low voltage halogens with LED equivalent and had no issues with dimming. But, this is not always the case. I've had to take back a whole case because they had interference with radio signals. Call the manufacturer and ask them. That's what we all do when we don't know.


1

If like the one we have the light is remote controlled from a small keypad or rotary control. This operates either wirelessly or wired. The actual dimming is done in the housing where the lamp and fan motor are located. The solid state device that does the dimming has failed. Why? The light that was in the fan....you did replace it didn't you ? probably ...


1

My apologies, but I must revise my original answer. There are "xenon" bulbs that are actually halogen bulbs filled with xenon gas. But what many consider to be a xenon bulb is an HID bulb filled with xenon. You must have a ballast associated with an HID light (halogens are not HID, there are no ballasts). I cannot find a 120V xenon halogens with a G6.35 ...


1

One consideration is current draw. CFLs have a power factor of about 0.5, meaning they draw twice as much current as a similarly sized halogen or incandescent bulb, which have power factor of 1.0. So if your fixture is rated for a 50W halogen bulb, that means: 50 = 120*current*1.0 (Power = voltagecurrentpower factor), so the fixture is rated for 0.42 ...


1

You should be able to find a good assortment of the crimp on terminals at any hardware or auto parts store. From your description it sounds like your terminal looks like this: If you do not have the appropriate tool to crimp the terminals onto the wire you can purchase one at the same location that you get the terminals. A low cost crimp tool will likely ...


1

Does the transformer have an overload shut-off, with an automatic reset? The resistivity of tungsten increases markedly with temperature. A cold tungsten-halogen bulb will draw much more current then a hot one (and they do get very hot!). So the first switch-on with a cold bulb will: Draw a very high current, which: Overloads the transformer, causing it to ...


1

The 953P does not come with a socket extension. I'm not sure where you got it or why. With an H99 I can't see the use of one. You CANNOT use a 12v MR16 in an H99 can. In fact, the 1420 trim is not for use with the H99 series. It is ONLY for use with the H1499 series low voltage housings. See here: http://www.cooperindustries.com/content/dam/public/lighting/...


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