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Due to the increased expansion due to heating from the dark color, you could use the same techniques to attach (or reattach, as the case may be) the PVC trim that is used for screwing down real wood lumber in situations where expansion is likely - do the installation in a way that allows the material to move without causing damage. For each screw in each ...


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Plumbing PVC is damaged by UV / Sunlight, and needs some sort of protection where exposed. Electrical PVC has UV resistance, but is not rated for plumbing uses. Schedule 80 PVC is quite commonly threaded. Schedule 40 is not, in my experience (IME.) Schedule 40 only uses glued-on pipe thread adapters, IME


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You should only join same type fittings with the correct cement. PVC is white, CPVC is almost tan or dark off white, ABS is black. The threaded PVC-like fittings (they are actually polypropylene) use a silicone or plastic compression gasket or fitting to seal the connection. Plumber's putty is not durable enough to seal two fittings. The various pipe cements ...


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This configuration may also happen if: Valve one is connected to two sets of wires the master valve on the controller and valve one wiring reversed. Look at the controller, see if there is a short wire connecting two terminals. There often is supposed to be a short wire joining the rain sensor. Maybe this is connected to valve one by mistake. In any case, ...


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Rather than "hose in pipe", use 200 PSI (if you want the tough stuff) black polyethylene pipe, and appropriate fittings, and no hose inside it. (Or schedule 80 pipe as suggested in comments, but IMPE black poly will take more abuse without leaking, and it's sun-resistant, for where it comes out of the ground.) For extra crush protection, butt it up ...


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I would verify the output module it sounds like you have a NC output instead of a NO. I have installed sprinkler equipment and modules that have inverted outputs if the output module is a different color is the usual key indicator. on larger systems the valve could be programmed incorrectly same issue programmed as a NO when it is a an NC so the instructions ...


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First - a leak here is bad regardless of water leakage or not. If it leaks water sometimes, it leaks sewer gas all the time. You could try just a new rubber coupling. Perhaps the one you have is somewhat damaged. Examine the pipes carefully and remove any sharp edges that might damage the new coupling before attempting to install it. You could also cut the ...


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First off,seconding what others have said. It shouldn't back up. Fix that and find out why. Second, its often a good idea to do "belt and braces" (over careful) when doing infrastructure stuff that you don't plan to even move again and will "just work". At the moment your proposed pipe just has one leak prevention method - the grip of ...


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Given the hub-bub above, one does need to use PVC pipes rated for potable water, i.e. Schedule 40. You might find PEX easier to work with.


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I have had success in a similar situation using an automatic regulating valve (also known as a flow limiter). The REG valve from flows.com maintains a constant flow rate (within a range) regardless of pressure. I believe it works with a spring loaded flow restrictor that closes the flow path as pressure increases. These are simple inline valves that resemble ...


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One to two inches of soil above the pipe should be plenty. I often get significant stands of grass growing in the soil that accumulates along the edges of my sidewalk if I don't keep up with edging it. And that's often a half inch or less. And as Gunner says in the comments, with a 4" diameter pipe, the grass roots will have no problem working their way ...


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