New answers tagged

10

Your bathtub drains directly into a concrete sump pit; not "the wall" as such but a pit constructed for this purpose. In the US and Canada, open sumps are used only for groundwater, like from drains that prevent basement floording. It kinda looks like someone wanted to put a bathroom into a basement, cheap, and came up with the horrific but clever idea to ...


3

When pipe is cut with a blade it can result in material debris and/or metal filings or oxides inside the pipe. This is equivalent to dangerous sediments or solids in a gas line which can damage or clog equipment. Pipes cut with a blade will likely need to be cleaned and/or flushed before use. Imagine PVC filings clogging a sprinkler head. Using something ...


3

Yes it most definitely is a problem. Along with all the structural problems that will result from this (which you may not care about since you will likely be long gone by the time it collapses, but your landlord should) there is the problem of mold and insects. Without a trap, lots of insects will take up residence down there happily munching up all the hair ...


1

The way I read the section it feels like they are trying to say "this process is specific for pipes, and we can't cut anything else even if it is pipe shaped. There is no blade, just special wheels and machines that only cut pipe threads".


9

You definitely shouldn't fix this yourself if you are renting and the landlord said it's good like this. But if you live in a place with sufficient regulation in the housing/renting market you can probably force you landlord to have it fixed for you. I bet this smells bad. Where I live a bad smell would be enough to be able to claw back some of the rent - ...


3

If you are looking to increase the water flow to the fixtures in your house but do not want to re-pipe the whole house, you could increase the supply pipe from the 3/4" inlet to the water heater. Tee off any of the individual supplies from the new 3/4" supply with reducers and the final pipe into the hot water tank could stay 1/2". This way you would double ...


0

It could b a fill tube to an underground oil tank. If it rusts/rusted and has/had oil in it ground contamination is worse than mosquito breeding


15

I'd be tempted to poke that large white fitting on a piece of flexi hose with a stick o see if it's really a trap that is meant to be screwed to the bottom of the bath drain. It's hard to tell for sure, but that long dip tube on the plug hole fitment looks like it's meant to be screwed into something and my betting is that the 'something' fell off when ...


2

A die is not a blade. That is what makes threads. A pipe cutter uses a round wheel that is not sharp but is tapered to a dull point. I make hundreds of threads and pipe length adjustments. Saying no blade may mean that if the end of a pipe thread is not filed it can slice you open as fast as a cutco knife from the factory. I have made thousands of threads ...


50

OK I am going to answer this like you are in the US. It doesn't differ much but to give a baseline. To sum it up - This is F'ing crazy as hell, unsanitary, and not code. So it looks like there is a basin siphoned off from the foundation that drains to a sump pump and the pump pushes water to... who the hell knows (it doesn't matter). Issues: If ...


0

What brand is the grill? Weber, for example, manufactures (or has someone else manufacture) a kit that includes all the necessary connectors for hooking the gas grill to a domestic line. Your first stop should be to contact the grill manufacturer, explain what you want to do, and see if they can provide such a kit. (And if the grill's manufactured by Weber, ...


1

I take it nothing backs up the floor drain? I am going to assume this is an older house. The floor drain is probably not hooked up to the sewer line and drains outside to a rock pit or something which is why it doesn't back up. Perimeter drain that comes into your house with rain / ground water and feed into your sewer service line inside the house would ...


0

From your description the sprinkler pipes are hung with rod hangers in the ceiling, and pipe hangers in the rod hangers. That would work fine but you wouldn't be able to slide the curtain past the pipe hanger. If you want to suspend the pipe from beam to beam, you could use EMT - thinwall metal electrical conduit, normally used for wiring, available at ...


0

Try hooks on the angles of the vault. Then you can hang rope/cable with only another hook or two to support the center. If you are hanging curtains, place the hooks where two panels met. Look for threaded bridle rings for the middle so you can fuss with it easier. 2 inch Bridle Ring from ShowMeCables.com


3

That is called a rod coupling nut. The part above it is a double ended wood screw threaded rod stud, or something like that Or you can buy a vertical threaded rod hanger


0

The sleeve piece you asked about may be a threaded insert (photo from https://www.ezlok.com/threaded-inserts-for-wood): The "long bolt" is called threaded rod or all-thread. The clamp piece for the pipe is called a pipe hanger. As you'll see if you do an image search, there are a multitude of styles available. I couldn't quite work out a mental image of ...


2

Yes. The vent can't run horizontal until you've reached the overflow height of the attached fixtures. The idea is you don't want the water to backup into a horizontal section of venting and deposit debris in the event that the waste pipe clogs. If the waste pipe clogs then the fixture should overflow before water runs into a horizontal section of vent ...


2

I looked at some manufacturer's documentation. Short answer: the stated size is the total length of the pipe nipple including the threaded sections. This does appear to be consistent among manufacturers (at least in the US / North American market). Also an important detail is that the length of the threaded sections is standard for each pipe diameter. So ...


4

Hard to know without having them to ask. Possibly thinking of having a utility sink or clothes washer in the garage? My other thought was considering fitment of a pre-warming arrangement but that would only need the cold line (and a drain pump feeding the shower drain water to a heat exchanger on the cold line, for a shower not on an upper level. The pump ...


0

Waste water lines are louder than supply lines. So moving them into the wall should be fine. You also can isolate them but I don't think there is a need.


2

The temperature at which methane liquefies is around -258°F (-161°C), and it doesn't freeze until -296°F (-182°C). If it's cold enough to freeze the gas in your pipes, you have bigger things to worry about!


0

Metallic pipes shouldn't go under 2°, usually the thermostat safety set-point is 6° to compensate for bad heat distribution. Anyway leaving a tap open (say 0,5 L/min) would help because water takes time to freeze having a little flow will keep it moving into pipes at a speed high enough not to let it enough time to freeze. If you plan to leave your home ...


-1

No, but it just have to have inside junction made by soldering (and not made with "tightening-type" fittings) or be contained into another pipe closed on the "inside". So an eventual gas leak is routed trough the outer pipe to the ouside, this at under UNI regulations. So steel pipe is usually not adopted for indoor usage because it needs "outer pipe", ...


0

HECK NO ! I just came from the subject neighbors house where I held a flashlight while the gas company man removed the meter and associated pipe because the owners pipe going from the meter into the house was corroded through and leaking (blowing bubbles with soap water) the whole 16" inch exposed length. Apparently it was ordinary 1.5 " diameter steel pipe, ...


2

Many points have already been mentioned, here is some supplement: Emptying metal pipes for a longer time period is a way to destroy them. A much faster corrosion from inside may start, since the residual water can easily react with the exposed metal and the steady delivering of oxygene in the air inside the pipes. The water inside a closed heating system ...


3

I don't believe anyone can provide a solid numerical answer to this question. We can all provide guidelines, advice, and considerations. There are far too many variables to consider to give this one mathmatical answer. I have heard of hundreds of cases of peoples pipes freezing when they have their heat set in the 60's. (not sure I have heard of it ...


2

If you're so keen to reduce heating costs, apply heat tape then insulation to all your piping that is anywhere near a cold wall, and then lower your thermostat. The cheap tape is readily available at any hardware store, and is stupid; it just heats the pipe the same at all temps. The good tape is available at industrial supply and is self-regulating, ...


4

This depends on the particular house - both how the plumbing is laid out (are water pipes located in exterior walls, or not?) and the relationship between heat delivery and plumbing. It may also depend on the heating system - i.e. hot water baseboards often have pipes that run in poorly insulated spaces at the edges of the house, and can themselves freeze ...


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