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8

That is a PIPE UNION. It is needed where you are unable to screw the threads together normally. If you look at the structure, you'll be stuck when you try to assemble the top without a union. That is a PIPE FLANGE. It's not usually used in plumbing per-se but is often used where iron pipes are used for other purposes such as what you are doing.


2

That's a pipe union, and the second is a flange.


1

My personal preference (currently, it used to favor tape more) is to use PTFE pipe dope (paste) rather than tape for threaded joint sealing. I generally have fewer problems that way. It's also become needful to closely examine threaded fittings as many in the current era are poorly made and may be difficult or impossible to seal due to thread defects that ...


2

I use dry ice on metal plumbing when the service valve is not functional or not in the area. Grocery stores have had dry ice in several states I have lived some times you have to ask and it is sold by the pound. I use a hammer and screwdriver to break some chunks off and a cloth to hold the dry ice in place. I pack around the pipe for 1-2” and hold it in ...


1

With the flow on the cold being the issue it sounds like water hammer. I have seen extreme water hammer with very tiny flows but it is much more common with high flows. The 2 solutions I know of for water hammer are. Strapping the pipes that are chattering, if you have access a couple of straps to keep the pipes from chattering will quiet it down. Add a ...


0

On my morning dog walk I have had some conversations with a plumber working on a total slab up rebuild of a burned house. All copper water lines below the slab are being abandoned. The new water lines will be PEX. He is bringing the cold water main supply into the house through a conduit of PVC Schedule 80. Looks like 3 inch, but I don't really know. He ...


1

First off, I'd be discussing this with the plumber, not his wife. Since the final line being replaced is the cold supply, any one of the three could be used. Since it's being installed in the attic and probably running down walls, I think the PEX is your best bet. You can run it from point to point without any joints. We've all seen PVC leak from time to ...


0

no you can't do that. if it connects to the sewer it needs need to either be sealed or have a trap. Use a fatter pipe eg: (inch and a half) , support it properly and fit a proper trap on the end. the flow rate is low enough that your run can self-vent but you will need 1:100 slope maybe find somewhere else to discharge the condensate. it's basically pure ...


0

If there are separate knobs for hot and cold water, it's possible that the washer in the cold water valve is loose. Disassemble the valve and tighten the screw that holds the washer. If this is a single-handle mixing valve, you may need to replace the cartridge. As a temporary fix, if the shower's water supply has its own shut-off valves, create the flow ...


2

Concrete poured over PVC pipe will not collapse it. If the zone worked before the concrete was poured but has little pressure now, chances are the pipe was damaged when the concrete was poured, either by it being shoveled in the hole or it being compacted to remove air pockets. It's not uncommon to use a 2x4 to compact concrete while it's being poured and ...


2

If the pipe was collapsed it could create an issue but normally it will have no effect on the flow pvc pipe is tough enough not to collapse even with several feet of concrete over it.


1

I have the exact same cast iron double cleanout, but the threads on mine are not as corroded as yours. In your case the simplest solution would be to clean up the threads as much as you feel like with a wire brush and then use an internal expanding plug which does not need threads. A step further would be to get the right size tap and recut the threads to ...


4

A common approach is a rubber coupling (also called a "Fernco®" for the same reason adhesive bandages are called "Band-Aids®") Counter-intuitively, the last time I read the instructions carefully the ones with a stainless steel reinforcement (sheilded) were not recommended for burial and the plain rubber ones (unsheilded) (with stainless ...


3

Why not have some fun here? See if you can find some sort of flared funnel and make the whole thing look like an Alpenhorn? Find some small but solid-ish demon or witch model figure to use as a support for the lower end, as tho' hesheit were holding it up.


1

I would use "duct seal". It's a putty-like material that's a bit sticky. You'll find it in the electrical department. It's much more robust than foam. Caulk would be difficult to work with on a gap that big and would be more difficult to remove if you had to do any modification later. You could probably get good results with silicone, though. I'd ...


6

I'd use whatever stool or chair you have around at the low end, and a stepladder or similar at the high end, possibly just leaning against the exterior wall outside the door. Cable ties, string, or duct tape would secure the pipe well. A little weight on low rungs could add stability. I love this idea and may borrow it myself (or some Rube Goldbergian ...


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