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2

I'd use a tubing cutter or hacksaw (gently!) to open a section in the supply pipe wide enough to comfortably work. Use emery cloth or other tool to debur the cut end. Now use slip-on connectors (like SharkBite) to attach your flex lines.


1

Check all the piping. There is probably a valve closed somewhere in the system that feeds the tank. If you had someone install this, get them back to check it out. Good luck.


0

Grout is porous, as are most cement-based materials. That is why tiled shower enclosures are built so that water that may (likely will) wick through the grout will hit a non-porous barrier installed behind the tile (actually, it's usually behind the substrate that the tile is installed on). Missing grout (or missing caulk that someone mistakenly used ...


0

Water will definitely seep into area where the grout is missing and deteriorate the drywall behind the tiles. You need to fix that pronto and check the whole shower for missing or loose grout. Are there any tiles bulging? Hopefully there is no wall damage. Try bleach on the mildew.


3

Yes it is your main shut off valve. I'm assuming this is in a basement, from the looks. You're good on that. The best experiment to prove this out is to turn the handle clockwise until it stops. This usually takes about 10 turns. The wire attached is a grounding conductor which more than likely goes inside your breaker box .


18

Yes, that looks like your main shutoff valve. It's normally the first valve on your water supply from where it enters your house, and typically before the water meter. In my house there is another valve on the other side of the meter that makes it possible to swap out the meter without draining the house. The copper wire is part of our house's grounding....


0

Several things: Re-train the kids to a 3 minute shower: (Australia uses shower timers and so do showers in swimming pools etc) A shower should be get wet, water off soap on, then rinse off... Not a 20 minute marathon... Why give the motor 120V when it is designed for 240V? Have you checked the voltage being delivered? The lowering of the water level may ...


2

You need insulation a looooot more than you need active cooling. Think "ounce of prevention, pound of cure". The main source of your heat is not ambient air. It's solar load, and there's your Google word. The solar load, by itself, will have a "Bridge on the River Kwai" effect - and if this is still not clear to you, sit in a car in the direct sun, ...


2

There are air conditioners using sea water, rather than a heat pump, but that works because ocean water is usually well below 10° C (50° F). Using a canal would be less corrosive, but you'd need a heat-pump to get useful cooling. Some examples of air conditioners using sea water to cool the condenser are at Flagship Marine. That said, you'd need to check ...


1

I have used a piece of plastic like a garbage bag tape one to the walls and 1 to the floor and peel it off the next day if it or they are wet it is coming through the slab and or walls (quite common). The slab might be an easy fix , I have used 2 part epoxy paint for concrete with really good luck to seal floors, cut the amount of water in the dehumidifier ...


2

A dramatic sag like that, when you add a big load, is due to one of two things. We'll look at them individually. Voltage drop Voltage drop is caused by resistance in your wires and connections. Resistance is normal for wires, and is a function of their size and their length. Bigger wires have lower resistance, and longer wires have (proportionately) ...


1

Just get the proper sized window a/c unit. Modern window units are cheap and efficient. Do regulations allow one to pump water out of this canal and then return it to the canal warmed up? Using city water will not work unless you could keep the water running constantly.


0

If there's a bathroom above the location, then you have a plumbing leak you should fix post-haste. If you do not have a bathroom there, you might have a leaky pipe but it's vastly more likely that it's time to fix your roof. You must stop water ingress into the home. It will destroy your home in short order.


1

GFCI is a concept, not a socket You have for years been dealing with one type of GFCI device: the GFCI+receptacle combo device. Your line of thinking is that all GFCIs are this. GFCIs come in a variety of packages. A plain GFCI-only (actually you'd recognize that immediately) A GFCI+breaker A GFCI-that-is-a-switch (it uses TEST/RESET for ON/OFF) A ...


0

The flow limiters in most faucets is based on 60psi. I have adjusted these in the cases they cannot be removed with a simple drill bit several sizes larger than the existing hole, in my last home the entire place had 3/4” copper even after the shower valves that were 1/2”. Seeing the massive supply’s and plumbing I set my master suite with a 6’ jacuzzi tub ...


1

Or, you could get a faucet filtration system and a glass jug. This is basically a water filter that clips onto your faucet. No taking things apart, and no water sitting in a plastic jug.


2

Icemakers work by freezing the ice, then thawing the outside, rotating the ice out of the tray, and eventually dumping it in the bucket. If the ice fails to release from the tray, the gears will make loud gridnging noise until you remove the ice from the tray. Easiest way I've found to do this is to run a hair dryer pointed at the icemaker until the ice ...


1

An icemaker typically has a little gearmotor that pushes the ice out of the mold when it finishes freezing. Those gears are often plastic and when they wear, the teeth start to slip and make noises.


0

Most likely what happened is that the hot water pipes were run in the same chase (interior wall space) as your heating ducts or even inside of the ducts themselves. That happens when someone adds a recirculating pump system to a house not built that way, because they need to run pipes back to the pump, but it's difficult to get access to chases to do so. So ...


0

I capped mine. I wrapped it with plumbers tape, then capped it with a 1/4" cap from Home Depot.


0

I've renovated a few houses, and whenever I replace a toilet the first thing I do is replace the shut-off valve. Unless they are frequently used, the older style shut-offs with the round handles tend to fail after sitting in the same position for years. Assuming you can still shut them off, they'll either start dripping when they are shut off, or start ...


0

Up to you, personally, I just fitted it and carried on as normal. But you can do the flush as you wish - I still have deposits but my water is very hard, however much reduced. Once a month cleaning the kettle is now once every 4 months or so...


3

So long as you do not have any check valves between the hot and cold supply, an expansion tank can be located anywhere in the system. Thus, if you have a check valve or PRV (which acts effectively the same as a check valve from the system point of view) on the main inlet to the house, you can put the expansion tank wherever it is convenient if there are no ...


1

Reasons for expansion tanks on a domestic water systems: Required by code/bylaw. Some municipalities may require one be installed so that the municipality's water system does not receive back pressure caused by the expansion of water when heated. Use of backflow prevention devises. When using a backflow devise, as may be required by some codes/bylaws, the ...


1

So I also live here in Phoenix since 2006. I always tell anyone back home, home being San Diego that the heat actually doesn't bother that much since if it wasn't so hot in the summer, then we'd be another California....Anyways what does really bother me is no cold water to rinse off at night before bed...My friends and family are always dumbfounded....But ...


0

Search to see if there are historical aerial photos of your house. With luck, there might be a photo of the open trench, or some indication on the ground before the grass grew in.


1

To tell the truth a really good French drain install will have no evidence with the exception of the water exit point. In some cases you may see a brown stripe through the lawn but not in all climate zones. A stripe that is brown is one way to tell but not always there. It is much like a leach field in some areas they are green above the drain field and some ...


0

Always start with correcting the grade around the house - i.e. the shape of the soil. It should slope AWAY from the house at at least 1/8" per foot (or 1 cm per meter) for 10 feet or 3 meters. If there is settling, pooling, or unfortunate past choices causing that not to be the case, correcting them (if at all possible) is a huge help to basement water ...


1

The water intake is an unthreaded plastic tube that sticks out the back. Are you sure about that? The water intake should be a brass fitting under the front lip. See page 13 of the PDF.


4

You don't need the compression nut. With that water hose, you should connect it directly to your water supply shutoff valve. The compression nut is used when you have a copper pipe as your water supply, like this: If that's what you have, remove the nut and the copper pipe. Your braided pipe connects to the water supply like this: And connects to your ...


0

Looks like it is related to the irrigation system as this happened during the morning run today. I found a valve on an irrigation system web site that looks identical so I believe I answered my own question :) I will replace the valve and examine my irrigation system to see if something could be creating an over-pressure situation. Thanks! http://www....


2

That looks EXACTLY like a pressure (only) release valve (as opposed to a pressure/temperature release valve.) I have one that looks like it on the inlet of my water system, though I do have an extender pipe to take the water nearer the floor attached to it. As far as I recall (I tested when I installed it, but that's a few years ago now), mine resets on its ...


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