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Flojet and others make a product for that. They call theirs “bottled water system” (to help in searching for information and a supplier). I would lean toward an established manufacturer, rather than the cheapest option on Amazon. This is from their product sheet:


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It could be a fresh air intake for plumbing, though maybe the pipe is a bit small for that. It could also be leftover conduit. If it is a fresh air intake, I probably wouldn't want to cut it down as having it be higher is useful for keeping debris out of it.


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It looks to me like a intake port or an exhaust port of some kind. If it does not connect to anything, or is not used for any reason, you can cut it, but I recommend after you cut it, if you cut it, make sure it does not vent anything or is not an intake (double check), and make sure to plug it so water does not drain down into it.


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I would suggest you replace the handle with one that will not corrode. You show it close to the water feed entrance to your domicile, during parts of the year the water coming in is colder than the dew point causing moisture in the air to condense. This in turns causes it to rust. You could clean it and coat it with a rust inhibitor, this is not permanent ...


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Dissimilar metals is why its rusting and no the valve itself is fine just replace the handle carefully and. Contrary to one answer yes u can buy just a handle


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I think what you will have to do is cut out the damaged top of the grey pipe and extend it up several inches to try and make the copper pipe section straighter. The copper pipe and heavy pressure regulator/backflow device (not exactly sure) being unsupported is just asking for trouble. After repairing the pipe, I would drive a metal post next to the vertical ...


1

I suppose it depends on how "to the specs" you added chemicals. If enough water is added, the solution will be diluted and the effectiveness of the chemicals will be reduced. You need math here. You'll have to start with the concentration you were shooting for, determine how much water the rain added, and then work out the new likely ...


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Have you tried to flush the Rinnai? We find we have to do a flush 2 times a year. Call your plumber to get that done.


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Since you don't seem to have any problems with leakage from the condensate drain, you know that line goes somewhere safe - i.e. through plumbing and out of the house. The purpose and destination of the other cut piece of tubing is speculative on your part, and there's no telling where it may go. It's possible that the other end was cut and left loose in a ...


4

From "boiler", "mains" and "electric shower" I gather you are in UK-influenced areas. I am looking for non fossil fuel heating for space and water. We want to keep the same pressure we get off mains as we do not like the low flow rate with electric showers. OK, seems like a bit of a values conflict, environmentalism without ...


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That's called "water hammer" and comes about when a valve closes quickly and the water running through the pipe kind of "bounces" back in the opposite direction. That creates a pressure wave that vibrates or bounces the pipes and you get an audible sound when the "dancing pipes" bang against stuff. It usually doesn't do harm to ...


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Move to an area served by a nuclear power station and your electric instant water heater will be "non fossil fuel". Probably not what you're looking for. Move to an area with an abundant supply of geothermal energy. I don't know if there are home geothermal systems that can do instant hot water. I don't think so. But it's worth a look. More ...


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Heating of water requires energy, and instantaneous heating of water requires instantaneous energy. In a residential setting usually gas and commercial electricity are the only available sources of instantaneous and "endless" energy to support indefinite/continuous water heating. Eliminating use of fossil fuel can be easy: use a heater fueled by ...


4

Hard to tell sizes from your pictures so you'll have to adapt this answer to the actual sizes of your fittings. Assuming the blue pipe is 3/8 inch PEX, and the fitting highlighted here is a 1/2 inch hose connected to a 1/2 inch threaded nipple: Then one way to do this would be to insert, at that connection point, another threaded Tee, another threaded ...


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It is mostly likely the blue inlet valve has developed a leak - I see it leaking. This seems like a common LG problem. Found the part from reddit https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B081S421DT/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_3TSMW6513VTE3Z67FP80 and plenty of YouTube videos to replace. Just ordered the replacement. I agree with you on the insulation.


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Water pressure reducing valves are simply pressure regulators, in the cases I have seen when these fail it has always been to full pressure , but there is another failure that is not the regulators fault. Debris in the water line can collect and create a blockage that can severely limit the flow or even stop it. I would not spend $ on a back flow valve that ...


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(a) A mixing valve on the potable hot water output from the IDWH will allow the water in the tank to be heated to 145F instead of only 120F, and this will prevent - even kill - the growth of pathogens inside that tank. 120 degrees is just not hot enough for health protection. 145 degrees in the IDWH tank will also allow the difference between the cut-in ...


1

If you can get to the other end of that line, hardware stores sell caps (probably 3/8 inch) you can screw onto the fitting (probably an angle stop). If at all possible get a cap that has a rubber gasket in it. If you cannot get to the other end, an overkill solution would be to attach a stop onto the valve and then leave the valve closed. (Risky though ...


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I bought a utility from either Home Depot or Lowes, I do not remember which store but they both sell similar products, that will turn on at about 1-3/8" and turn off at 1/4" of water. The pump is a Utilitech model 0435062. It also has hook-ups to different size hoses. Check it out. This may be what you are looking for.


2

They make pre-made consumer products specifically for this, that are approved as a complete package, and work reliably, and don't require any kitbuilding or hardware hacking. They are called sump pumps. The key to success of a sump pump is to have what you should have anyway: a sump. A small hole at the lowest point where water tends to collect. The sump ...


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The multi turn shut-off valves use a rubber washer. Over time the rubber deteriorates and gets cracked or dissolves into something that looks like black ink and the valve will no longer shut off. The 1/4 turn valves don't have a rubber washer. They have Teflon seats. The hope is that the Teflon will not deteriorate and the valve will last longer. I can't ...


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I was able to solve this problem. It involved opening a few walls and experimenting with cutting some pipes. Unfortunately listening devices were of no use. I was able to track down some people who worked on this house and others nearby that had the same problem, although the location of the problem was a little different. In both the downstairs and upstairs ...


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Interesting idea. But I would first think through the "why". There are three advantages to water directly connected to a refrigerator: Filtering of the water for ice & drinking Automatic ice maker Chilled drinking water The typical 5-gallon jugs I have seen are all either filtered, spring water or both. So no real advantage to running them ...


1

You certainly do not need a pump. Here's the secret to getting enough water to sprinklers. You don't need to run them all at the same time. So if you have 4 sprinklers and only have the flow to run 2 of them happily, then simply have 2 zones. Run one until it's done. Then run the other. Best to do it at night - you'll lose less water to evaporation. ...


4

Here is an explanation consistent with the facts you have given: The leak is around the stem. When the faucet is off the water cannot get to the stem because the sealing mechanism stops it. When the faucet is on full with a hose attached, the hose causes backpressure which forces water through the stem. When the faucet is on full with no hose attached, the ...


1

Did you ever resolve this? Did you figure out the issue and fix it? An 1886 basement is probably constructed from natural stone. Is it? Is there any unfinished exterior wall in the basement that you can see? The stone itself is porous and the pointing, unless it has been redone recently, is also usually leaky in a basement this age. In heavy rain, or ...


4

You seem to have chosen a brass tee to replace the rusting galvanized tee, and a reducer to reduce the branch size down to half inch. This is the right thing to do. But you don't have all the parts you will need. Expect to need to replace the ferrule on that short copper pipe and the nipple and nut at the top end may need replacing too (especially if they ...


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Hire a plumber! This is an easy DIY project for someone with some experience, but by the sound of it not something you should attempt yourself. If you are at the level of experience where you do not know what tools or replacement parts you need, you should hire a professional to do this. The reason is that with the water shut off, if you discover you are ...


2

Can you do it yourself, yes. Are you allowed to do it yourself, maybe, apartments might need professional, depending on your local laws/regulations. Tools required probably a couple decent adjustable wrenches, a couple pipe wrenches, a hack saw and wire brush, and pipe sealing tape/paste. Pieces required are all the ones that don't come apart nicely. Quite ...


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