New answers tagged

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I would add you should run your water to the place that is easiest to take apart and fix. When a main is shut off a lot of debris is kicked up and calcium and other deposits dislodge. Sometimes this isn't fully feasible but I try to run my garden hose for 20 mins - there's no filter on it so debris and deposits should just spit out. I have also ran my ...


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Unless your condo association is willing put in a filtration system at the main source then you either have to flush the pipes for a minute or two (Not practical for refrigerator supply lines.) OR Install a filter in your unit. This can be done if you have one supply pipe coming into your unit as opposed to separate lines that go to individual fixtures. ...


4

When re-filling the tank after a flush, some water is routed thru a small tube coming from the fill valve/float into the overflow tube that refills the bowl. Check to see that it's not broken or come loose from the over-flow tube. If not broken or detached, with the lid off the tank, flush the toilet and see if you have any water coming out of that tube (...


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My toilet does this, I find that holding the lever down after flushing and letting the bowl fill up to an acceptable level solves the symptom. Aside from dealing the the symptom a root cause can be one of several things: If the plumbing stack is not vented properly then that could cause a siphoning effect which drains your toilet bowl An old toilet simply ...


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No! This would work fine for your sinks, though anyone who visits would get confused because they would assume "hot on the left, cold on the right". (I learned that years ago from an HVAC supplier who didn't think much of ordinary plumbers - all they need to know is "hot on the left, cold on the right, #()$@(#$% runs downhill". But I ...


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Your question boils down to "please validate my wonky idea" and I will absolutely NOT. Yes, you can do it but you shouldn't. At best your proposal is something that would be done in a super emergency situation. You can switch the hot and cold lines at the tank but that would really be quite an obtuse solution. So now your cold valve gives hot ...


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Washerless faucets are known to have this problem. When the pressure drops the weight of the handle can pull the valve on. Opening the valve and making the springs tighter has worked for some. Heavier springs are required in the worst cases. I believe we had 1 person that had it fixed until they opened the garden hose (large flow). Increasing the pressure ...


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Short answer, very likely sulfate reducing ,or other bacteria are in the aquifer that your well water comes from. They generate hydrogen sulfide ; a person can smell much less than 1 ppm of H2S. These bacteria are even a problem in oil/gas wells as the H2S can increase corrosion. I think one can find a small additive pump to add dilute bleach to the water ...


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It looks like a standard whole house filter similar to this one. Replacement filters can be obtained at almost large hardware, orange or blue store. There is a variety of Replacement filters that are for sediment, charcoal for taste, and others. I use a similar filter at the kitchen sink to remove the chlorine taste of the city supplied water. You could ...


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I have to somewhat disagree with Ed, which is rare. When a problem like the OP described that springs up suddenly, it's probably not a water quality issue. From wells, the water quality (or lack there of) is pretty consistent. What the OP is most likely to have is an anaerobic bacteria colony somewhere in the cold water plumbing. Sounds really nasty, ...


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Your water softener may need cleaning. I experienced this problem in a house I recently bought. I moved the softener bypass valve into its bypass position. Problem solved -- though took a bit longer for hot water to stop smelling due to hot water heater tank. My water is fine without the softener. I plan to get rid of the equipment.


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I have had a home that had horrible iron content and the water smelled of sulfur. The water softener should take that out of the water. Your mom noticed the sulfur in the past so she may be more sensitive to it. I would change the regeneration cycle on the water softener to a more frequent cycle. Cycling more often will use more salt and water but it may be ...


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You need to use a spreader on your lower roof. It's a "standard" solution in New Zealand.


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Open the valve and see if it makes a difference. I would think any 2 faucets on at the same time would have the same effect. The valve may have been installed to dampen water hammer issues. I have seen this done and work but it limits the flow.


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Below is a picture of the lighting instructions for your water heater taken from Rheem's website. Make sure to follow the lighting instructions carefully and do not skip any steps. This same instruction set should be available as a sticker on your unit. It looks like you do in fact have to depress the knob in order to turn it so avoid using force. If you are ...


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These PVC Panels from a BigBox store are inexpensive and could be used as a water barrier. Cut them cross-wise to 12 inches or to the depth that you need to bury them. Overlap them by a couple of "grooves" in the proper direction so that water will flow over from one to the next (instead of in-between them). You can also use some silicone caulk if ...


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I would first try bleach rather than vinegar. This looks like it could be mold and bleach kills mold very effectively. We use the same brand of shower head, ours being hand holdable on a flexible line. We use them for years and don't get that brown deposit. If yours is hand holdable, let it hang down in a bowl of bleach in water. First try 1/8 cup in 1 qt ...


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Probably algae - not sure I'd do anything. You can get a bag fill it with white vinegar and tie it around your shower head and leave it over night.


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also you could turn that area into a beautiful raised garden bed higher again than the neighbours no problem and if you wanted you could even put a small long thin sligtly buried water catcher -- then yah free water for gardening... hope this helps your problem


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If you want to do anything with this well pull the pipe up. If the water level is shallow it may come up easily as a single line with a foot valve. If it’s a submersible it may not come up easy as the wires can be hanging it up, but in both cases pull that pipe up. If you can’t remove it you can’t really expect to use the well. Once you pull the pipe the ...


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Isolate the problem. Turn off all faucets. Turn off the stop valve on the hot water at the faucet you care about. Unscrew the faucet connector from the stop valve. Put a pot or something to deflect the water and a large bucket below it (or get a flexible connector and route it to a bucket or something). Make sure you have someone near the main water ...


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Sounds like you're looking for a 3-way ball valve. Inasmuch as your use has one source and two destinations, the source would go to the middle port of this valve and the destinations would be fed from either side. (image from supplyhouse.com) It seems one of your concerns with using two ordinary valves is the possibility that the pump could be turned on ...


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You might want to check hot tub stores / online sites. This sound like the sort of thing they need all the time. That said it might be easier and simpler to have two sump pumps and separate piping. I'd worry about something going wrong and the waterfall pump pumping all the water out when you don't want it to. Jonathan


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If diverting the rainwater away from the house doe not stop this problem, potentially the problem is caused by the fluctuation of the groundwater, or there is a spring near that corner of the house, provides the basement wall wasn't adequately waterproofed. Unless you don't mind wasting your money by trying some fixes, the proper way is to involve a Civil ...


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I would recommend that you call a local "well guy" and ask him the same questions. They have the expertise to do everything "well" related including determining if that pipe or casing is really for an old well. If it is a well, he may have even been the guy that drilled the original well or knows who drilled it to get the specs of that ...


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If you have separate faucets for hot and cold water, the screw that holds the hot water faucet washer may have come loose, allowing the washer to move around, vibrate and cause turbulence. You might call this "sputtering". If this is what happened, it's a pretty easy fix. Turn off the hot water supply below the sink. After removing the faucet ...


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If it is spring loaded then orientation does not matter but if it is swinging pure then it has to be orientated that its weight causes it to close.


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The green arrow shows the direction to turn to close it. The purple arrow shows the packing nut discussed in the comments. I'm not sure what you mean about North, South, etc but if this thing is installed in the ceiling with the red handle pointing up, you could stand directly below it, reach up and over it with your hand to grab it from above, then turn ...


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Try running the water for several minutes, both hot and cold sides, at the other fixtures too. Do they behave similarly? Do the symptoms diminish after a minute or two? When a water system is opened, especially for something like a heater replacement, air gets into the pipes. Eventually the air finds its way out through the various faucets. As bubbles of air ...


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#2 is definitely better. But for $6 or so, you can buy an Orbit 61008 drip irrigation manifold and be able to adjust each of the 8 lines, while not having dead spots. The problem with your setup is that bigger dripper heads can take almost all the water off of your 1/4" pipes leaving the outer drippers starved.


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Having that many heads on at 1 time you may not be able to get proper coverage. I would defiantly say the branched setup so you can run half at a time if needed. It’s not so much efficiency but coverage that will be effected. Or possibly our terminology needs to match. Separate branches run independently will cover more area and provide a more even coverage ...


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Movement in the hot water supply line below the sink may be touching the shutoff valve thus creating a resonant effect. Try partially closing the hot water shutoff valve to determine if it's modified angle stops the sputtering. If this stops the sputtering, dampen movement in the hot water supply line or block anything that could touch the shutoff valve when ...


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I would not be overly concerned about this unless it was the highest point in your plumbing or if you had low water pressure from the water supply (or if you are on well water). These couple of inches extra should be flushed with water at all times and recycled with the rest of the water supply. There is no reason to believe that the water in these small ...


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This may help. Without examples we can't provide be sure. Sounds like DGS does both in Virginia. Probably, they accredit the labs as following all standard operating procedures to be a competent lab and they certify that the test they use is sensitive to detect lead if lead is present, and specific when not.


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Depending on your location, this may not be up to code. Under UPC, a dry vent cannot be horizontal until it is a few inches above the fixture it vents. If your drain pipe backs up over time, you'll have water enter your horizontal vent section, where it can deposit solids and cause the vent to clog. A wet vent can be horizontal because it's expected to be ...


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Where I live, we put styrofoam domes over the outside taps. Your long pipe is larger than that, but you can use the same idea. Find a cheap/disposable foam cooler sold for picnics, and use that to cover the whole thing. Or, just buy foam boards and glue together a suitable box shape. To make it hug the wall, put a more squishable foam around the rim to ...


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