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If your motion sensitive lights do not come on during the day when you walk by, then they also have a built in light sensor and are designed to not come on if there's enough light. Simply re-aim one of your existing outdoor lights to shine more directly on the motion sensor and the sensor's light detector should automatically disable the motion sensing ...


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If both sets of lights are on the same circuit at the same location, a 3-way switch is all you'll need. Since neutrals will be tied together, connect the feed to the dark screw (common terminal) and the load, usually black or red, from each set of lights to the two remaining terminals on the switch.


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What you are looking for is a 120v double pole switch (search google, amazon, etc for more info and circuit examples). That will allow you to use one switch to control 2 circuits. You would wire the regular light to be on in the on position and the motion controlled light to be on is the off position.


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I don't think the intent should be to separate wood and concrete. I think that applies to encased wood such as in footings where concrete retains moisture for some time. Wood and concrete are used together all the time. In your case its just wood on a flat surface but it doesn't really do much as it is a flat surface so water will sit there. The plastic ...


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Wood and water don't mix. If you want to make wood last, you have to keep it dry. So no good answers unless you can convince your neighbor to remove the rotting debris. Assuming you and the neighbor share the cost of maintenance and replacement of the fence would entice them to take care of this. Regarding preventative treatments, there are some do's and ...


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From what I can see, it looks to be in pretty good shape. You want to start out by getting a deck wash from your home store and applying it according to instructions. You usually spray it on with a garden sprayer and then pressure clean it off. Stick to setting the pressure cleaner at around 1800 PSI, 2000 max. More than that and you can damage the wood. ...


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If you can find charcoal gray vinyl siding, that would work. Use a table saw or router table to trim away the stepped part that you don't need, which will leave a long narrow strip in the width you want. Even tin snips could work if you have a steady hand. Gray vinyl siding won't need to be painted or re-painted and won't fade appreciably even in desert sun.


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Fabric. You already have that beige fabric up. It is already attached to the wood. Go back to wherever you got the beige fabric and get some in gray. Fold the edges under to make a strip the width of the wood underneath. Attach the strip to the wood with staples or upholstery nails or whatever you used for the beige fabric. Of course there will be a ...


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Of course the splits (“checks”) will affect the performance AND strength of the wood. Wood is a product of nature, it’s not manufactured so there will be imperfections in the wood. Wood shrinks more “across” the grain rather than than the length of the grain. So you are seeing the checks developing in each piece of wood. Your wood is to be used for deck ...


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That's called "checking", and it's what happens when wood dries out. Always. It's why wood used for exterior purposes should be sealed fairly readily. It's not usually a structural concern as it's parallel to the grain and the strength axis. You'll want to cull (trim away) any wood that you don't consider aesthetically appealing, do your ...


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Of course it's a violation of the electrical code to wire up a 120V outlet to 240V, and if there is a fire incident or appliance injury anyone or any insurance agent who finds out about this will try to blame it on this even if it didn't cause the incident. If you are legally subject to the electrical code, then it is also a violation of the law. But being ...


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You say you get winds up to 60 MPH but you don't see a need to have a tall structure anchored in concrete? Sure, most wind will likely whistle right through an open(ish) pergola, but all it takes is one good gust, square on the flat side of the roof joists, and it'll blow right over. Even if you were to thread the top of the rebar and use nuts & bolts to ...


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I'll answer with a practical suggestion, rather than precisely answering the "Can we" question with "you can!". A complex appliance designed for indoors, full of electronic controls and sensors, and lots of hidden inaccessible crevices where moisture and insects can collect, is unlikely to last long outside, or to work at all in some ...


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