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This screams frozen vent stack. To keep your drains flowing, you need to equalize the pressure. The problem is your sewer lines contain harmful gasses you don't want in your house. As such, you have a vent stack, a common drain pipe that allows gasses to vent out of the roof. In deep winter (i.e. well below freezing, which is common in Michigan) what can ...


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this is more of a suggestion than an answer, but I think you should go to a big box store and buy a new toilet (a good one). Install it in the winter and see if it solves your problem. If it doesn’t you can return it and know that it’s something beyond the fixture. I had a friend who’s toilet was bubbling and we thought it was everything else... needless ...


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As others have suggested, knowing why it backs up is key. For that, a reputable plumber with a camera can find the absolute answer. If it's damaged pipes there is no other long term option than replacing the main. If it's backing up due to bends or joints then installing a cleanout would be the best option for cleaning it out yourself in the future. Then ...


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This might sound strange but sometimes people inadvertently lean against the tank while sitting on the toilet seat. This can put pressure on the large gasket that is meant to seal the tank to the toilet. Even a new gasket can be compressed on the back side near the wall of the ring gasket which could cause leaks on the front side of the gasket. In the ...


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flushing the second toilet causes a sudden dip in supply pressure that allows the first to seal and once sealed there is no flow holding the valve open. It sounds like the float valve needs a new button.


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A clip or clamp on the hose will do nothing to keeping the hose "up in" a cavity. A pressure fitting is needed, that expands into the cavity. Check with the plumbing expert where you purchased the device. Use an appropriate length braided stainless steel covering hose. If you must use adapters, stainless is best. No bi-metal interactions that way. Else ...


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I've never seen a nut between the tank and the bowl. Seems like this could interfere with the seal of a thinner tank-to-bowl gasket as well. I have seen installations where rubber washers are stacked in between. I have seen installations with metal washers under the bolt head and the nut, as well as without. I don't think it's useful under standard tank-to-...


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It is a flow limiter. The cistern will have an overflow pipe in case the inlet valve fails. In an area with particularly high feed pressure the rate of filling in such an event might exceed the rate of drainage through the overflow. To prevent the resultant flooding the flow limiter can be fitted. It's optional because if the feed pressure is poor you ...


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This appears to do a few things. A backflow preventer. Note the nub on the "top", that should actually go down. Gravity and back pressure seats it on the inlet pipe to try to prevent tank water from backing up into the supply lines if there's a pressure loss or shutoff. A flow limiter. Without it the toilet will flow faster, but will be more ...


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Looks like a fill valve regulator. Pretty sure the metal washer is at the top when you put it in. Its actually an optional thing, and leaving it out might be just fine. It's weird that it fell out though.


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I recently updated the toilet in my 1930 farm house. I have found a similar problem if I don’t hold the lever down until the tank is empty. It will flush a few times and start plugging up again. I have found running water in the sink and tub helps break up the clog , I am guessing that the old cast is catching some of the paper or waste it builds up and not ...


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It sounds like the clog is far enough down so that, given enough time to let the water drain out, there is enough room for one flush to enter the pipes fully before hitting the clog but not for any subsequent flushes. Like Nate suggested in the comments, your best bet is to snake it. Here is a how to: https://www.wikihow.com/Snake-a-Toilet


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Sounds like a combination of fill valve failing to shut off and the overflow tube being too tall. The drain should not have any effect on the amount of water in the tank. Sometimes the fill valve is a simple fix (adjust a screw or replace a seal), but they only cost around $10 for a basic replacement model, so if you can't figure it out right away it's a ...


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Those should have different effects. I suspect it's not working right. The expected result is that the short flush should cycle the water in the bowl, but not completely empty the tank. The long flush should empty the tank. If you have a manual or can find one, you might be able to adjust things.


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Sounds like a partial blockage in the outflow pipe and a blocked vent stack. As the sewer fills with the water from the shower (due to it being partially blocked the water cannot quickly escape sosit floods) the air displaced by the water which air would normally escape through a vent (such as the vent stack) is not escaping, this causes an in overpressure ...


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I normally put it on the left side (public toilet), due to the fact that the majority uses the right hand to do the wiping and cleaning. I feel much safer to pull the tissue using my left hand and to pass it to my right to do the action. I hope it make sense.


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