New answers tagged

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The lack of venting does cause the drains to flow slowly. In your case, mostlikely caused by the stack freezing again. I would suggest you do one or a combination of the following: 1) Insulate the exterior portion of the vent stack. That way it is less likely to freeze during the coldest time of the year (one time fix) 2) Add a heating element around the ...


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I've had this problem before and it was caused by one of the diaphragms in the flushing cistern. A plumber replaced them and the noise after flushing never returned.


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Yes you can. You will just need to remove the bolts that are at the bottom of the bowl and then raise the toilet up. I recommend flushing it first as it'll be lighter. ALso have a trash bag handy. Although you have flushed the toilet, there's usually still some water in it. I recommend one person lift the toilet up and another person put the bag under ...


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You could buy a new one... toilets are as cheap as 60$, and decent ones under 110$. Your labor is free, however... the cleaning supplies might run you 20$.


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Muriatic acid is the best cleaner for toilets in this state period. It isn't for everyone but to be safe, wear gloves and have and extended brush and this is a 15 minute job. I have used muriatic acid many many times and not only will it clean the inside of the toilet bowl but it can be used to unclog the rest which may have issues. Warning when ...


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My furnace blew up a few years ago and my insurance company hired a professional cleaning company to clean everything. (About 8 weeks and $35,000 later and they were done.) I had to leave the house, but stopped by occasionally to watch. I had terrible rust stains in the toilet (we have “hard” water). They used an electric drill (actually battery powered......


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Probably what happened is the black plastic nut on the supply line cracked. It looks pretty old and might have been over-tightened when you hooked it up to the bidet. You said the supply line can't be replaced - but it can. The supply line looks like pex and runs straight out of the wall. Is there a shutoff for it? Or did you have to turn off the water at ...


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There should be a tube coming from the ballcock valve (Korky unit) going to the overflow pipe with a clip holding it onto the edge of the pipe. The purpose of that is to run some water down directly to the bowl after the flapper closes in order to refill the bowl (and help take care of "Klingons" on the side). I have found Korky fill valves to be especially ...


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I have an R&T A1260, which looks very similar. This is how you open it up. At the bottom, you'll see a little pull tab. Pulling on it will remove a filter. The top has a blue cap that can be lifted by the two protrusions. There is a horizontal pin here that you can remove with a pair of needlenose pliers by simply pulling it out. This frees up the ...


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Not exactly an answer, but you can't put images into comments:


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Hissing means water movement. Period. It's a leak. In valves, there are two kinds of leaks. Leaks external to the valve - i.e. puddles in places water does not belong. And leaks through the valve -- i.e. water flows in correct places, but the valve refuses to shut off all the way. In a sink/tub, it's easy to recognize the second type -- the faucet ...


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You have water leaking slowly into the bowl. This can be a warped flapper seat, build up on seating surface, or worn valve seat. To verify, mark the water level in the tank with a pencil and turn off the water valve. Come back in 30 minutes and see that the water level has changed. To fix: clean the flush valve and seat. Especially if it feels rough. ...


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Here's something you can try sometime. Take some toilet paper and put it into the bowl. Let it sit for a while. What is its consistency? It's most likely mush after an hour or two. Take a plunger and stir it after it's sat. It should shed like crazy. Toilet paper is designed to break down in water. That's important, because any other kind of paper is not ...


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Newspaper will not break into pieces when wet for a long time and may clog the toilet sink or pipe. It is better to throw such paper in the trash bin. Ink is also used in such paper with plumbum, which is not safe for health.


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I am living in a country where it was pretty much a normal practice some 30 years ago. Communist party press was issued in excessive numbers and everyone was forced to subscribe, so the old issues accumulated everywhere. In contrast, toilet papper was not always that much abundant and sometimes was even worse than a newspaper. Flushing the toilet paper down ...


28

Newspaper is actually one of the worst types of paper materials to use for flushing. One of the things not mentioned is the gummyness of newspaper. When newspaper gets wet it sticks to more newspaper really well. So not only does it not break apart but it easily builds. Basically if you have any sort of weak spot in your plumbing system the newspaper ...


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Use the newspaper as toilet paper but don't flush it. Throw it out with your garbage or compost it. It sounds gross, but not as gross as the alternatives.


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No, that would not be safe. If you want to use something other than regular tissue (like paper towels), you would need to dispose of it in the wastebasket. Toilet paper is made to fall apart quickly when it gets wet and doesn't contain any chemicals that would harm a septic system or a city's sewer treatment. Newspaper isn't the strongest paper, but it ...


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The problem with gluing plastic is that there are so much variations in the plastics and glues may or may not be compatible. Basically, unless the manufacturer tells you, it's impossible to know what glue will work. It's best to replace the entire unit. They aren't very expensive and you'll save so much time, effort and headache.


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To come at this from another direction (Michael Karas' answer is spot on), that's a Fluidmaster fill valve. Yours looks to be a much older model, in that they don't use metal for the arm anymore (stainless steel is more expensive than plastic). I've never seen the float part sold separately, since the float surrounds the column (i.e. not removable). You can ...


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That whole assembly is the toilet tank fill valve. The float assembly below rises as the tank fills and pushes up the tab that broke. That in turn pushes up the linkage rod and then the lever to turn the water off. I am not sure what made the tab on the float break but possibly the plastic just got super brittle after being exposed to chlorine in the water ...


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Yes. The bidets use a T which is installed between the water supply to the toilet and the fill value on the tank. You have neither the fill valve or the typical toilet water supply. You should be able to go from the hose bib with the red handle to a 3/8" female adapter that would then allow the bidet supply to connect.


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That looks like a rubber link , usually a S link to rubber to chain , flip the Handel and look for a chain not connected to anything , usually a flapper valve in the bottom of the tank... Don’t worry that water is as clean as the water you drink out of the faucet if you put your arm in the bottom of the tank and pull the flapper up it will flush if the tank ...


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Flush mechanisms are fairly straightforward. Diagnosing the problem is the first step. Correcting the problem may require an adjustment or a new flush mechanism. Diagnosis With the lid off of the cistern push down on the flush handle. The lever inside should be connected to the flap (usually with a chain) that releases the water at the bottom of the ...


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Be aware you can also get hairline cracks in the plastic shut of valve. I just had to replace the valve because of this issue unlike the easy to get at fittings shown. I had to deal with a solid one-peace porcelain body with connection at the rear under the cistern. Wonderful job and one you can not achieve without a plumbers wrench patience and will.


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A pipe wrench holding the exposed portion of the nipple should allow you to remove the valve without loosening the joint in the wall. But be sure to inspect the condition of the pipe. This appears to be galvanized steel pipe which rusts over time. If the pipe appears to be rusted severely or is filled with scale, you may want to replace it and even the ...


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It looks like you have "cross threaded" the plastic pipe. (The term comes from the new set of threads you have accidentally cut into the pipe, which cross the original threads at several points.) The only repair that will work here is to force the metal nut straight onto the end of the pipe, forcing it to re-cut the original, correct threads. This will ...


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Turned out to be the fill valve. Once I replaced it, everything quieted down.


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I had a weird offset flange in a bathroom where I replaced a toilet and like you, couldn't come close to finding one at my locals shops. At this point one option is to visit a plumbing supply outlet and see if they can help. They are the ones who know about these specialty items.


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It sounds like the flapper might not be sealing initially. As it fills, the water pushes on it and completes the seal. It's probably slightly warped on one side (given the light-pink color, this flapper looks faded, meaning it's probably old). You can verify this by pulling the valve off and inspecting the edge


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