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Just wanted to clear up some points regarding flange orientation: -In the United States (California) the reason to have the flange so that it's not in a recess is to prevent "concealed fouling". -Further, the toilet flange is not meant to provide structural support the toilet. The flange should be installed firmly to the floor with corrosion ...


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Morphed into an answer. Patric : The bolt holes are 180 or directly across from each other you will notice the flange can be turned (at least when new) always use brass hardware. steel will corrode and I have seen people break expensive toilets trying to get rusted bolts out. The light weight flange is strong enough to keep the pvc pipe in line with the ...


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You can also try using a nail set or narrow punch to tap the grout loose. This is the quick way to remove/break the grout joint. Keep punch centered on grout and use gentle soft hammer taps. Most likely some of the lid is covered by grout so keep the punch at a shallow angle (20-30 degrees). Once the grout is loosened try to lift the lid. If it can be moved ...


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Yikes. That was a really bad idea on his part. The first thing I would try is a grout saw. It's designed to grind the grout out without damaging the tile. Hopefully grout is your only obstacle. If the tiles immediately above the tank are insurmountable, your next job will be to try and remove them. They are partial tiles and hopefully you can remove them by ...


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A 6" adjustable, Crescent, wrench will fit up there nicely and then turn the screw from the top.


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A crow’s foot wrench is a suitable tool for this or a plumber’s wrench which works left or right. See basin wrench at Home Depot...


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You're on the right track. Pliers or a wrench turned at an odd angle is how I get them off. You only need to loosen it a little bit before you should be able to do the rest with your fingers.


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Anyone looking at this question - the right answer is to get a new tank. Yes you could "mend" it. But the problem is that to mend porcelain right you use basically a hard set epoxy. Should work great. Well now you are actually using the toilet when you sit you put slight pressure on the tank. This epoxy forms a crack over time or puts more ...


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I used to remodel a lot of bathrooms. As long as the flooring at the base of the toilet is sound, I second the use of plastic shims to level it and then caulk the base. That's the best solution


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There are plastic wedges designed to stop rocking of toilets. Don't try to stop the rocking by tightening the floor bolts.


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In my experience you won't get a dead-solid mount on a hard floor about 90% of the time. The toilet base and the tile are too likely to have imperfections that affect the connection. So, rely on caulk. Clear, 100% pure silicone in a bead pressed into the void under the toilet will make it solid. I usually do the front and sides, but leave the back open. It's ...


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As long as the thud is indeed coming from the flapper (not the fill valve), I can't imagine this causing any problems. You're good!


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Epoxy coating is a solution which requires professional help and expense and is better than the following "desperado" solution. Get in there and clean it thoroughly with hand made attachments. dry it properly with rags, paper fan etc. Scratch a groove on the crack or bad joint. Scratching is important. Allow to dry. Apply white silicon with a ...


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If the problem keeps occurring after a new flapper has been installed then you should be sure that: the chain from the flapper to the handle is not too short as to not allow the flapper to seat fully. If the flapper continues to sit askew it may be installed wrong. make sure that the two openings on the flapper arms are sitting evenly on the overflow pipes ...


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So the plumber came and was about to go on the roof to check on the vent pipe like @5Diraptor suggested. However, before climbing up, he checked on the clean out pipe and saw it was backed up with standing sewage water and toilet paper floating. Eventually, he found the main sewer pipe in the complex was blocked, when then led to us finding the main sewer ...


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It is probably a bad "o" ring on the plunger or a bad seat seal on the valve base. You should be able to get replacement parts at your home store but I've found replacing the entire fill valve to be a quicker and more complete fix to the problem.


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The usual approach, circa 2020, is to replace the entire fill valve. Given a WIDE variety of toilet fill valves, and no idea what kind you have, it's hard to speculate whether the one you have is economically repairable or not, much less what particular part it might or might not be. If the shutoff valve outside the toilet operates as it should, that is one ...


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The bump is most likely not necessary for a good seal. Bumps like that are usually location devices for assembly (at the factory or on site). There's probably a corresponding dimple or slot on the hard parts of the toilet. They allow for quicker and more accurate manufacturing. So just be sure that your new seal stays in the correct position as you tighten ...


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