New answers tagged

2

Someone told me to drain the tank. Then put duck tape over the holes under the rim. Add your cleaner of choice to the tank, (I poured directly into the bowl filler part as I was "flushing"). I used CLR. Let it sit for 30 minutes. Opened up the holes pretty well. Did it again. Flushes like new. I have HORRIBLE water, rust, iron ect. Give it a try. ...


5

I agree it is a water saving attempt. However, no one has described its operation. If you go number one, press the flush lever once. If you go number two, press and hold the flush lever for a few seconds and the flapper will stay up for a complete full flush.


10

All the answers thus far are correct, in that it's an (early) attempt to save water on flushing. The important part I don't see in any other answer is that it's an early attempt, and they did not work very well. It's like watersaving toilet version 1.0 or 1.1, and watersaving toilet version 12.3 is on the market now. If you'd like to save water while ...


2

The plastic bowl is a water saver as others have stated. If you just put less water in the tank you can have issues getting the solids to go down. The plastic sleeve only allows the water above sleeve to enter the bowl. The extra height gives the water a little more push to clear the bowl. The water below the top of the sleeve never gets used. If the flap ...


2

As mentioned, the sleeve is a water saver. It allows the flapper to close without draining the entire tank. If the interference with the flapper is physical (the flapper is touching the sleeve), then you'll either need a different flapper or to remove the sleeve. I had one of these where the device was fastened via the tank bolts, so complete removal would ...


6

It's probably a water-saving measure. It would slow the flow of water out of the tank and allow the flapper to close sooner. I'd remove it. If you want to maintain the same water use, put a full bottle or jug of water in the tank opposite the filler stack.


1

I have had this happen on toilet models that have a vertical tube and not a flapper. These are called no-flapper style. Here is a link to a particular model: https://www.plumbingsupply.com/mansfieldtoiletparts-claro.html The vertical tube looks sort of like an upside down trumpet, where it forms a seal at the base of the tank. Two things can happen with ...


0

Turn off water to toilet. Flush it. Empty rest of water in tank. Often times a towel is easiest way. When it is really dry remove the flapper. Clean bottom of tank by the hole, sand it (any sand paper). Just make the hole look new, no need to overdo the sanding. Put flapper back on. Turn on water and try it out. If that does not work order a new flapper ...


2

It is a sweated valve with a screw on attachment for the toilet connection. Rather than try to remove it, I'd buy a second one; they are typically quite cheap. With a helper available, use a giant wrench to try and break the valve free. If the valve breaks, turn off the water; if it moves, great. If it doesn't break free, take the handle off and then take ...


1

Is this a sweat or threaded valve? It is difficult to determine if the pipe is galvanized or copper that has been painted silver. Threaded for the former, sweated for the latter. I bet on sweated copper as i see a drop of what looks like solder just under the valve on the pipe. Plus i do not see any threads under the valve as you would typically see with ...


1

You will need to install a flange to fit your existing pipe. Take some measurements and stop by your home store or a plumbing supply store. you'll probably need a close flange similar to the one below so you don't block that drain pipe As with all flanges, you will still need to drill holes into the floor to secure the flange to the floor.


1

You need to install a toilet flange for cast iron. The only thing that looks weird is that side pipe that enters and would likely be blocked by installing this flange.


2

With a freshly pumped tank and cleaned filter your next possibility is a flooded drain field OR a broken /collapsed or line full of tree roots on the line out of the tank to the field. I have seen broken lines several times after heavy rains that may have slightly lifted plastic tanks (I have never seen this with a concrete tank). I would be looking for ...


0

i hate to just plug a product but on tv flex tape looks like it may work. he literally takes a piece and pluggs up a above ground pool by taking a piece of the tape and literally plugging it from the inside of the pool. so the tape can get wet and still stick. enough pieces, im sure would make a perfect seal. and then just peel once done.


4

There is almost no way in the world that your piece of cast iron here was designated for a toilet. Edit based on additional pictures: That is almost surely a washer drain. Good news is it is probably vented. Bad news is it isn't big enough for after truckstop buffet. So everything below is still true but you may only need to bust up until you get to ...


2

Get a fernco rubber coupling to transition from cast to plastic. Assemble your dry fit plastic piece and fernco to determine the proper height to cut the cast iron. Use an angle grinder to cut the metal to the correct height. As isherwood notes, this was likely not a toilet flange originally you should make sure that it is attached to your sewer line and has ...


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