New answers tagged

1

Does this mean that the supply valve has lost its grip...?" YES. Your valve has failed and it is very common for "bib" type stop-valves to fail this way. It will need to be replaced which requires shutting off upstream (maybe even all the way upstream, as in the whole house). For a couple bucks more you can get a ball-valve type, which should ...


2

First, verify that your filler pipe or flapper hinge piece is installed correctly. Perhaps it's backwards, moving the flapper mounting ears away from the drain hole slightly. Then, I'm not sure your assertion that all flappers are the same holds water. :P Take yours to the store and compare brands for one with longer arms. If you're the inventive type, clip ...


1

Given that there is plywood on top of the foam to spread the load out, if you use even the usual lowest grade of XPS (not sure what type of foam you actually used or plan to use) it should not deform under load. That grade is 25PSI, so if the plywood spreads the load to 16 square inches of floor it should still hold up a 100 lb toilet and a 300 lb person - ...


0

That piece is essentially a slotted socket wrench. It's probably intended to break away under severe tightening force rather than crack the porcelain or damage the valve parts. Put the piece back on and use a hex wrench on the assembly. You'll have to hold it there while you turn it, just as you would the hex wrench.


1

If the plastic part you are removing is headed to the scrap/trash/recycle it might be ripe for "crush it with locking pliers" as a brute force removal technique that should still be low-stress for the porcelain. At some intermediate level, grab it with locking pliers to unscrew since it does not have much for a wrench to grab might apply, but it ...


1

Reframing behind and busting open the slab seems typical for going from a standard toilet to a wall-mounted. My question is - why?


0

What seems to have fixed the slow leak into the bowl is painfully simple: Tighten the darn nut, but don't overtighten the darn nut. Here's a picture of the bottom of the tank with the flush valve installed: The instructions that came with the flush kit I bought suggest you tighten the flush valve nut (only) hand tight and warn about tank cracks if ...


2

If the leak is only from the tank to the bowl, and not on the floor, then the only option of the three you listed that can be the cause is the flapper. Judging from the photo your flapper can be replaced without any disassembling of the tank. There are two flexible tabs on the back of the flapper that go over two fixed pins on the bottom or the overflow ...


1

Finally removed the screw from my Duravit toilet as suggested by @RedGrittyBrick (kudos to him) using the back of a claw hammer, a rolled toilet roll cardboard cilinder as fulcrum and to avoid damaging the porcelain and quite a lot of brute force.


1

I have had the same problem and wasn't sure whether the nub and washer went face up or down. Based on experimentation and documentation, I can say the nub does go face up. Here is a picture of it as part of the larger fill valve assembly part https://www.us.kohler.com/us//productDetail/serviceparts:619391/619391.htm?skuId=578118&brandId=empty&


0

You can take those apart--usually the cap comes off with a decent amount of pulling--but it might be less effort just to replace the whole thing. You'll have to turn the water off either way, and it's not that much more time spent draining the last of the water out of the tank, unfastening the water line, replacing the valve, and buttoning everything back up....


6

If there's no red water on the floor then the flapper is the most likely problem. Run your finger over the plastic rim that the flapper sits on. It should be very smooth with no ridges or cracks. If it's good, then replace the flapper. There only a few bucks at your home store and only takes a few minutes to replace.


1

Flappers tend to deteriorate over time, usually because of their constant interaction with in-tank cleaning products and chemicals found in the water. They can cause the flapper to warp, crumble, and eventually lose its seal over the flush tube, allowing water to leak through. There’s a very simple test to tell if your flapper is broken. Add a few drops of ...


0

Hydrogen Peroxide in a big plastic bag with the toilet seat. Not too much - just enough to wet it all over. Tie back and put it out in the sun. The UV, heat and peroxide will whiten it.


2

I had a rental house a number of years ago that I bought and when I bought it there was a leak in the pipe between the meter and the house and it wasn't disclosed. You should have a shutoff valve on the house, if it's functional, turn it off and see if the meter stops. If it doesn't stop you've got a leak between the meter and the house. I also agree with ...


0

It could be fungus or algae, because the porcelain is often damp from condensation. Try a little bleach/water mix... if that quickly eliminates the stain, then it's likely biological. There can also be fungal growth in the toilet tank, but you cannot use bleach there, because it would destroy the flush (flapper) valve after some time. Try vinegar and ...


3

The simplest option, assuming that the flange would not stand too high above the finished floor, is to do nothing. The wax ring used to seal between the flange and the toilet can take up quite a lot of misalignment. If the difference from the high side to the low side is less than maybe 1/4 inch (or even more, possibly) it'll be fine. I'm not sure that a ...


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