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I would put a metal sleeve inside the smaller tube then use hose clamps on the outer tube which should produce sufficient compression. The disadvantage is that these tubes slide easily, but if the pressure is not too high then it will work.


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There are many ways to hide small holes in Sheetrock and plaster. One is toothpaste as jsotola suggested but some land lords or slum lizards use black lights to find this as tooth paste many times has whiteners, these show up and my friend Got tired of finding crappy hidden fixes. For these small holes most of the time I would say he was an AZZ , then when I ...


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A "cheese cutting wire" is a classic way to approach this problem. Thin, strong wire with handles so you can pull it through, cutting the adhesive as you go.


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The backsplash may be attached with some type of silcone sealant/adhesive. I don't acetone will touch cured silicone. I would try to work a thin putty knife down behind the backsplash and the tiles.


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Acetone is great for dissolving glue and adhesive. Try pouring some along the top of the backsplash and let it soak in between the wall and backsplash. After about 15 minutes try to pry it gently with a mud knife, looking for a little loosening of the backsplash. Apply more acetone as needed. Good luck.


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Do not ever tile over cork. Unless you poor a 5ft thick layer of concrete over it 1st. Then it might work.


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If you read James Hardie installation you need to thinset the board down with modified thinset so over cork no don't do it


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Any scrap felt or carpet should work as a cushion for when you are storing your folding step ladder. You don't need anything for when you are using it because YOU SHOULD NEVER LEAN A FOLDED STEP LADDER AGAINST SOMETHING THEN CLIMB IT:


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You can check with the heating mat manufacture to determine if the cork is a suitable subfloor. But I don't think that cork is a good underlay for tile. It's too soft. The target finished height of the floor is a key consideration. If you install materials over the top of the existing floor, the new floor level will be higher. That can be awkward, ...


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When I am redoing a bathroom and adding the needed backer board to a subfloor assembly, I would remove all existing finish floors no matter how many to get back down to the original subfloor. Then evaluate that, repair it if needed, add to it if needed to make it stiff enough for tile, then add the one layer of 1/4" backer board, then the heating wires, ...


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I've never had to do this (install tile over cork), but I think you need to remove the cork. Backer/cement boards needs to be firmly fastened to the sub-floor. Any kind of softness, give, or "springiness" will be transferred up the tiles and will cause the tiles or the tile joints to crack.


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I use a scrap of unbound carpet like the marine carpet found at big box stores Cut a strip to size needed and use a contact type adhesive like Follow directions that say apply to both the rug scrap and the ladder with a cheap paint brush. Allow it to dry until it is not sticky to touch. Now align carefully and press the glued surfaces together. The bond ...


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