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Drains like that (speaking from first hand experience) are disasters waiting to happen. All it takes is for a big leaf or two to lay down over the grates to block the flow of water. Then the stairwell fills up until it flows over the threshold into the basement. Here's what did. I found a short piece of PVC pipe that would fit down into the existing pipe. ...


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Traditionally there would be a hole in the stone/brick/mortar and then a wooden plug wedged into the hole and the rough nail goes into the wood. Over time the wood rots away and the nails become loose. In the interest of authenticity (oh, and cheapness!) I would replace it in the traditional manner. Trim a piece of wood to relatively loosely fit the existing ...


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I would agree with jwh20's answer, only differ in "it is possible but not cheap". You can hire a geotechnical engineer, who is familiar with "underpinning technics" and solving groundwater issues.


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In my experience it's nearly impossible to push such a concrete wall back to its original position. The best approach is to break it up and remove it and then if you want a wall there, replace it with one that has proper drainage so that it won't get pushed over again.


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After multiple trial and errors the following did result in a water-tight seal: place rubber-tape / water proof tape inside a coupler on the downward end place rubber-tape / water proof tape around the entire outside of the coupler layers of gorilla tape or similar high strength water-resistant tape on top of and around the rubber/waterproof tape In ...


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We did the same: scraped off or filled as needed to level about 5in below desired grade, and fill with 4..5in top soil in garden areas. Paths and patios are clay/fill at 1..2in below grade, covered with landscape fabric and gravel. If it's a large yard you can raise the grade by the amount of top soil, prevent soil & gravel spill with edging, and make ...


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You can use either product you have mentioned, but the important thing is - no matter what type of mortar you are going to use, you need to prepare the surface well to receive it and to keep it stays in place. I wouldn't trust the bonding agent applied on a smooth hardened surface. You should roughen/chipping the surface to a magnitude of about 1/8", ...


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You can use self-levelling compound. Mix it a bit thicker, so hold back some water when mixing in a bucket. SLC nominally flows like pancake batter but you can make it thicker like peanut butter. Make sure you scrub the concrete clean, and roll-on or brush-on a primer, mix-in a primer or get SLC containing primer (read the label). Keep a trowel handy and ...


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It might be safe today, specifically; it is just condensation after all. However, I am 99% certain that drain pan material inside A/C coils is not approved for potable water, nor is the PVC drain pipe. Regardless, I think a quick image search for "clogged condensate line" would tell you that condensate water is reserved for your enemies.


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It's probably not potable in any sense. I mean, I've drunk out of a garden hose a few times as a kid, but there's a reason they don't let you use those things for your RV potable water. The same would apply to A/C coils (anything on the coils could be in the water). The larger issue will be that the line might start to fill with things like algae or mold. ...


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The water left through cracks, joints, or other openings in the concrete when the groundwater level dropped below the basement floor level.


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Unless they are perforated, there is no reason for them to go deeper than the inside of the wall. You are installing them to relieve the hydrostatic pressure on the wall. Pushing them back deeper into the ground behind the wall may allow them to drain up-hill water easier, but if water builds up behind the wall anyway, then you still have the problem of ...


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