We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

New answers tagged

0

knock the stud back into the wall as far as it will go without deforming, then grab the edge of the sleeve with locking pliers and pull, once the sleeve is removed the stud will come out easily.


1

Take a metal cutting chisel and cut it flush with your wall, then patch with Portland cement. All done!


-1

Whatever you do will leave a mess. A hole saw for concrete slightly bigger id than the od of the fixture will allow complete removal, but obviously you won't use it with the normal centre drill bit. Depending on how swaged the outer tube is now, it may be possible to knock the bolt back in, so the tube can be wriggled out - dependant on the original hole ...


1

If the wall is hollow cinderblock, maybe you can hammer it in so it is flush with the wall. Failing that, angle grinder.


1

Unfortunately, wedge anchors like that are intended to be permanent. It looks like there is a bit of the collar protruding; if you can manage to push the bolt into the wall and grip the collar well enough then you could possibly wiggle the collar out and then remove the bolt. If it won't come out then you're probably looking at cutting or grinding it flush. ...


1

Get yourself a pair of vise grips and get the bolt out first. The bolt pushes the wedges out to anchor the base into the concrete. Then you should be able to wiggle the base out. Your other option is a good carbide metal cutting sawzall blade to cut it off flush with the concrete.


1

Hand mix in a wheelbarrow Portable, electric powered mixer like this: Towable, electric or gas powered mixer like this: Or any similar mixer that's small enough to maneuver into your work space. Of course, you could order a truck, dispense it into a wheelbarrow at the curb and wheelbarrow it back to the work site. Images from UnitedRentals, the first ...


0

From this Wikipedia page, I quote: AAC products may be used for both interior and exterior construction, and may be painted or coated with a stucco or plaster compoundEmphasis added That would lead me to believe that the thermal expansion properties of AAC and plaster are similar enough that there wouldn't be any cause for concern about the coating flaking ...


2

This is dependent on the type of concrete you use. With a mix that is heavy limestone (the new white stuff everyone uses for driveways) you will for sure need rebar. If you are using a mix with a lot more aggregate it may not matter or matter enough to worry about it. I have demo'ed 60 year old steps with no rebar so many times and almost all were in ...


1

Do not remove any coatings on top of your concrete, especially in a snowy climate. What you are proposing will not help your situation at all. The snow/ice will bind to the paint layer the same as it does now and it will be just as slippery. However by taking away some of the protection of the concrete, it will fail faster. You have two options: Shovel ...


2

The stairs have a greater risk of cracking without the rebar. That may not be a problem if the area behind the stairs is sturdy. I would just use rebar to be sure, as in the long term stair life could be shortened by a 5 or so years.


4

Concrete floor paint, as used in showrooms and garages will do just fine. Different colours are available, and some mix with epoxy, giving an even harder finish. Might be an idea to mark the edges of the treads in a lighter colour, for safety reasons.


0

Yes, it is doable. You will need two things - 1) a grated trench that intercepts and divert the stormwater to the adjacent open land or a pond; and 2) a curb under the proposed front wall and openings to prevent water from potential overflow the trench. Ideally, the top of the trench shall be at least 2" below the indoor elevation. You may need to make ...


0

Solid wood flooring is not recommended to be glued to concrete subfloors or installed directly on concrete. Many things can go wrong: 1) wood expands and contracts with humidity, seasons, etc., 2) moisture can seep in between the wood and concrete subfloor, 3) Wood expands greatest in the long direction (with the grain) The organization that controls solid ...


5

That crack is typical of concrete. There is just minor separation with no shifting along the 2 sections. The groove formed in the adjoining surface is a "control joint". It is there to control how a large concrete mass cracks so it occurs in a way that is not so unsightly. According to the picture, it is doing its' job very well.


2

For the inside of the fireplace you will use a "Stove and Fireplace Cement" or may be called a "High Temp Cement". You will need to read a few different products as some are more suitable for a skim coat and crack repair and others are more suitable for thick applications. For the rest... Just a high quality modified (latex) thinset. ...


2

IMO, the most important feature of this slab is the transition to the ground level, which makes the slab fully wheelchair accessible. To avoid hitting by the snowplow, you can add a warning barrier, or make a strip of flower bed alongside the slab. Place an adequate layer of coarse gravel, which shall be compacted to offer good bearing capacity, and deep ...


0

Or 1/2" below, with a slope and a drainage channel with gravel or similar.


1

Above and with a slight slope so that it doesn't collect water.


1

You'll want to research/google "self-leveling concrete". It's a special mixture of concrete and polymers that you mix up and pour onto a surface like you have and it levels itself off and dries as a smooth, level, and hard surface. Perfect for setting tile. While it's bad form to recommend specific products here, you should be able to find a ...


1

I would agree with jwh20's answer, only differ in "it is possible but not cheap". You can hire a geotechnical engineer, who is familiar with "underpinning technics" and solving groundwater issues.


4

In my experience it's nearly impossible to push such a concrete wall back to its original position. The best approach is to break it up and remove it and then if you want a wall there, replace it with one that has proper drainage so that it won't get pushed over again.


2

The concrete plug can be easily chipped out when the need for the cleanout arises.


0

I don't think the "concrete screw" is sufficient to anchor the heavy-duty racks. I recommend using the "wedge anchor" instead. Wedge anchors are fasteners designed for use in masonry/concrete base material that provides holding power through expansion. The anchor is inserted in a predrilled hole compress and then exerts force to create ...


5

A socket wrench is a good tool for driving concrete screws. Your hammer-drill might do the job, but if not, don't rush out to buy an impact driver if you have a socket set handy. Always buy the hex-head concrete screws.


2

When fastening to concrete I drill with a Bosch rotary hammer and then drive the screws with a battery powered impact driver. For a 5/32 drill it takes me perhaps 10 to 20s to drill 2..3in deep. It then takes another 10s to drive the screw through 1.5in lumber and into the concrete. (Numbers are very rough based on memory)


1

Here's a different apprach, but may be more work. Cut a rectangle of your hardware screen approximately 1/2" longer and wider (1/4" on each side) than your opening. Slit the 4 corners on a diagonal 1/4"-1/2". This allows you to fold the edges without buckling the screen. Then, force the piece of screen into each opening. The edges ...


0

You can use either product you have mentioned, but the important thing is - no matter what type of mortar you are going to use, you need to prepare the surface well to receive it and to keep it stays in place. I wouldn't trust the bonding agent applied on a smooth hardened surface. You should roughen/chipping the surface to a magnitude of about 1/8", ...


1

You can use self-levelling compound. Mix it a bit thicker, so hold back some water when mixing in a bucket. SLC nominally flows like pancake batter but you can make it thicker like peanut butter. Make sure you scrub the concrete clean, and roll-on or brush-on a primer, mix-in a primer or get SLC containing primer (read the label). Keep a trowel handy and ...


0

As small a hole as you're going to need, there's no need for even a hammer drill. A masonry bit in a regular drill and some patience should work just fine. No doubt a hammer drill or a rotary hammer (yes, they're different) will make it easier, but if you don't have one, all is not lost. Also, If you're driving the Tapcon and it stops short of full insertion,...


0

Leave an escape route. Trapping animals in a space is no good. They try hard to get out and chew everything. Then they die and stink. Ask how I know! Leave one of the holes open so the animals that live under there can leave. Put a Havahart trap in front of their route out and you can catch and either kill or relocate them as they leave. Then when no ...


1

That's a solid plan. The only thing slightly easier than manhandling hardware mesh would be to purchase pre-framed ones. Obviously, that's way more expensive. Tapcon-wise, a small hammer drill will work hard with the 3/16 drill bit, but just take your time. (Pull the bit out regularly as you drill.) A rotary hammer is nice for bigger holes, but not necessary ...


0

Is the apron covered? Do you have stormy weather or periods of heavy rainfall? How about large snow packs? All this matters. Keep heavy rain flowing away from garage, and make sure melting snow does not puddle and refreeze to cause slip hazard. For this you need at least 1"/4' pitch. This is an accepted general pre-caution for insurance & liability. ...


1

Minimum slope (i.e what "flat" things outdoors are sloped to by competent workers - totally flat is generally not a good practice due to not draining) is 1% - 1 cm per meter, or (close enough at 1.04%) 1/8" per foot. If more is convenient, it won't hurt for drainage, and generally won't bother an automobile entering - 6% is not uncommon on ...


0

A pitch which causes the water to flow away from the garage is a good pitch. In terms of water: The steeper, the better. You might laugh at this saying it is not an answer to your question, but blowing heavy rain or a driveway that leans toward the garage can move a lot of water the wrong way and your car will not drive up a wall. Proper seal against water ...


1

"There are lots of benefits of using chemical resin anchors as they are more than capable of holding massive loads and their application can be fairly quick. However, correct preparation for fitting chemical resin anchors is essential... Chemical Resin Anchors: When To Use Them? In short: If you did it properly, then it is proper and strong. If you are ...


1

I would be paranoid with that installation too. It's the resin that would scare me. The M8 rods would be OK if you drilled through the concrete and used washers and nuts on both ends. If drilling through the wall isn't an option, I'd be using 2" lag shields and 3/8" lag screws.


0

Cut out 3/4" plywood to make the inner and outer reinforcing rings. (1 pair of rings on the top and bottom of the cylinder, one pair at the mid-height.) Soak 1/8" plywood strips (16" wide) overnight, then bend to fit the rings to form the circular shape. Clamp the plywood boards and allow them to be air dry completely. Apply glue to the ...


3

You can purchase precured concrete cylinders used for drainage culverts or access tunnels. They're made in sections. Try searching for "precast concrete riser ring" You might also get two cardboard sonotubes for the form: a larger one for the outer diameter and a smaller one for that inner. You might get plywood and use a jigsaw to cut a circular ...


1

Tool-free method: Level it, walk on it, saturate it with low pressure water, wait an hour, walk on it again, saturate it again with low pressure water, wait a few hours, walk on it once more. If it still doesn't feel compacted, do more watering, waiting and walking. Once you can walk on the compacted soil without leaving a footprint, you're good to put stuff ...


2

How about cutting the blocks in the base course? Use a full 8" high block at the low end and trim each successive block 5/16" more working your way to the high end of the project. Trimming the blocks exactly to height isn't super critical; so long as they're within say 1/2" of the needed height the mortar bed beneath the block should fairly ...


1

The sewer and storm lines are usually deeper than few feet from the grade. If they are buried too shallow, you might need to drop them lower to receive adequate topsoil, and place thermal protection over them to act as a protection for frost. Unless you intend to place heavy items directly over the buried drain lines, no special protection is required. ...


1

If you use this as-is, I would certainly cut back or even eliminate the sand as this looks to have a lot of sand-like material in it already. Alternatively you could "screen" this and take out the fine material in favor of the larger stuff. For your application, however, it doesn't sound like strength is a huge consideration, so you can be a bit ...


1

No sealer is going to be able to withstand the water pressure that is coming up through the slab. Since taking the slab out and properly waterproofing below it and re-pouring it is probably a huge undertaking, your next best bet is going to be to find and eliminate the water source that is putting all this water under your slab. Check your downspouts and ...


0

I am a fourth generation fence company owner in Florida. In my entire career, we have set wood 4x4s in the ground without concrete as does every other fence professional around. The concrete is not smooth in a hole and holds water. Every single post set this way rots quicker right at the top of the concrete in just a few years. However soil alone packed well ...


0

I usually do this with a water vacuum: It's like a normal vacuum cleaner, except there is no filter bag inside, and it can suck water without damaging the motor. Also quite convenient to clean large quantity of sawdust, demolition dust, mud, sand, etc. In your case the important features are that It will suck mud out of an irregular surface like concrete. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included