New answers tagged

2

We did end up renting a walk-behind grinder and it did the job. It was not "easy" but only took a few hours, and the rental cost was reasonable. The ideal grinder we wanted was out of stock but would have had a smaller cutting width. However the one we used despite being larger still didn't take excessively long to do the job. We had a small amount ...


2

The best concrete cleaner I have found for stubborn stains is diluted muriatic acid. You can purchase it in diluted form at most hardware stores. I recently used it to remove dried tung oil from a concrete patio. You need to be sure to wear gloves and protective goggles if applying it by hand. Follow directions on the bottle. In my case I left it on ...


0

If it is being covered and hidden with wood or other materials why not just use pressure treated wood to build it up to right height , of course you will have to use some anchorage for stability ...A 10 min project


0

The easiest and most practical would be to clean slab , put a bonding agent and use concrete with smaller aggregate , im in canada so it would be 10 mm ( .394 of an inch ) You can then pour floor min depth of about 1.5 inches which is not much loss ..You need 4 to 5 yards max of concrete plus pay the finishers should come to about $2,000.00 maybe $2,500 max ...


2

Mix CLR and water and apply to the chalk line. Brush with a stiff brush, wipe up the residue, and rinse. Works perfectly every time, for me at least.


1

Hell yes, my driveway is chert with matching pea gravel on top and it has held up in this swampy land i call home in northeast alabama for 21 years. Chert is alabama concrete


4

When asbestos was used in everything from cooking pan trays to attic insulation on ducts I don't remember hearing of it being mixed into concrete walls or floors. Even if it was used with the concrete the only way to release it and have it become air borne (where it is a hazard through inhalation) would be if the floor was chiseled or ground on. Mopping or ...


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1:5:5 for a weak concrete is ideal The coarse aggregate shouldn't be too much


1

The fact that you have water seeping in through the cracks is much more concerning to me than the cracks themselves. I'd start at the outside of the home and find where the water management on the property is not working right. Check your downspouts, check your grading, check especially outside the room that this concrete is in. Solve that problem and you ...


1

If you're going to paint it then coat it with clear epoxy afterwards so that the finish can withstand abuse. Since you're painting it black then it should help to mitigate the yellow tint which some reviewers are mentioning at https://www.amazon.com/Countertop-Epoxy-Resistant-Resin-Gallons/dp/B00866QSLK I have no experience with these products so if it's ...


2

For longevity, you must use a concrete stain to apply color to the counter top. This usually involves acid to etch the surface followed by the stain color. It is a fairly straight forward process that can be accomplished by most DIY-ers with moderate skill levels. The problem that you should consider pertains to health issues. This staining process is used ...


4

Can you paint it? - Yes. Will you regret painting it? - Probably. A concrete stain will get into the material and darken it, and then a concrete/stone sealer will reduce the porosity of the surface. Paint sits on top, and in countertop service will almost certainly get scarred, scraped and generally dinged up - so repainting may be a frequent task. It's not ...


2

Isherwood has good points about the capacity of the floor slab, you need to confirm what you have. A standard 4" slab may not hold up to the rigors of the lift. If the install guide says differently or you know you have a thicker slab that can take it, then carry on... Non shrink grout is typically used for this type of condition. Pack it fully by ...


-1

Use wood to create a shim. 2000 lbs on 130 square inches (13x10 per your post) is about 15 psi (pounds per square inch) while the strength of wood used this manner is around 400 psi. Wood is cheap, easy to source and easy to cut as well.


0

In my area, Home Depot rents floor buffers as concrete grinders, with a different bottom blade that looks like a giant blow-up of the circular ring blades used in electric razors. You should NEVER, EVER rent one of those things. And certainly not for this purpose. They are actively, maliciously, homicidal. A friend and I rented one for the purpose of ...


0

What about an air powered scraper like this one: https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200589333_200589333 We used this in the carpet business to get glued carpet off of concrete slabs.


1

I don't actually think you have concrete beams in a 10 story building. Concrete is strong but it is not flexible and if you really had a 10 story tall concrete structure the slightest shake would crack the heck out of it and it would come crashing down. I can't see it meeting quake codes. I think you have regular steel I beams that are covered in ...


4

You should not mount anything to the beam (A) by drilling in to it. Under load the bottom is under tension and the width of the hole reduces how much the beam can manage. Think of it as cutting a strand in a rope. Theoretically you could saddle the beam with a strap, rope, chain, and cut out a section of sheet rock to allow for play, or have a brace made to ...


0

The technique is to angle the bit after it walks to get it back on track. Doesn't work if you do a pilot hole, and probably not until you've done several hundred Tapcons. But even I could mess this up, and if it was unsatisfactory I'd mount them to a placard.


3

Start with a small bit. (or maybe a diamond dremel bit.) You still want to use a punch, then use a 1/8"th bit, or smaller if you can find one. Then step up to the size you need for your anchor or screw. The small hole will help guide the larger bit. Alternatively you could make a jig; Drill a hole of the size you need to guide your masonry bit in a ...


1

I've used both types and each has unique benefits depending on the situation. If the crack is shallow and narrow the self leveling caulking works very well at filling it completely. For wider larger gaps the thicker less fluid caulking and a putty knife works well. I've also used the self leveling type caulking to fill larger cracks ,but after pushing in a ...


1

If the cracks are due only to an initial settling, and the slab is now stable, patching with concrete definitely does have the benefit of being the same material and can be stronger. However, this makes the whole slab one block again. The advantage of the flexible sealants is that if the cracks are due to seasonal movement of the slab, they allow the slab ...


1

This does not look to me like something that can be fixed with caulking. The entire door assembly is sloped away from the opening (good) but it seems as though water running down the doors is dripping off the end on to the concrete curb, then pooling and/or running back into the opening (bad). If it were me, I would: use an angle grinder to smooth and ...


1

It's hard to prescribe an exact product, but I ran into similar issues recently myself and here is what I learned. Some of this may be helpful in making a decision... There used to be two main options for caulk: silicone and latex. These days there are 'siliconized' latex caulks that perform well and are easier to use than 100% silicone. Silicone is hard to ...


0

There are several anchoring system for attaching to concrete or brick masonry. My favorite is a screw type anchor called tapcons. You need a hammer drill and a normal drill or impact driver to sink the concrete screws. The dill bit is included in the box of screws usually. Drill and prime the hole to remove excess dust. Then sink the screws directly in the ...


0

Will it fit? almost certainly. Is it a good idea? probably not. Most modern regular drills* have a 3 jaw chuck which will grip round or hexagonal objects in a wide variety of sizes. While I can't see the jaws of the chuck in your photo I would be extremely surprised if it was not such a chuck. The problem with using a corded drill as a screwdriver is that ...


3

You absolutely can. In the professional world that's the standard, in fact. Your drill can accept any round or hexagonal bit or driver up to 10mm in diameter. It's not fussy. Chucks don't vary between corded and cordless tools, generally speaking.


2

Coat it with a concrete epoxy paint (and grit, for traction, since it's a step.)


2

Seems like the biggest problem here is lack of a railing -- 14 feet is a long way to fall! I'd do nothing to treat the cut. There will be water exposure from rain or irrigation but at least there's not likely to be any road salt that would accelerate corrosion. Further, if corrosion does get into the wall, the stakes are relatively low. This isn't a bridge ...


0

There isn't much you can realistically do that will make those slabs even: either one has to come up, or one has to go down. I don't know what options are available for mudjacking a slab with a house on top, but if you could even find someone that can do it, I'd imagine both the cost and risks would be.... a lot. depending on how big the gap is, you might be ...


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