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2

I am gathering that you are going to frame behind the toilet/sink. If not, this is a no-brainer. You want to use 2x6 so it is easy to move any plumbing through this (vents). Also if I were you - no way in the world would I lose a toilet. You bought the house with a full bath in the basement and if you take out the toilet it probably doesn't meet ...


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You could install a laundry type pump system to pump the kitchen water overhead . I had one of these pump systems in a laundry area in an apartment I lived in and it worked perfectly. And, if you wanted to add a bath room or powder room they have systems that "pump up"for that too.


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The bricks are attached to the foundation with a layer of mortar. This is not only normal but just about the only way to do it. Are there any other concerns it is hard to craft an answer when things look normal and no specific question. Are you concerned where the forms meet? The slight indent in the foundation?


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If your primary goal it to drain the water, then simply cutting a slot through the high spot can be quite effective. Even though they are quite small (and as such will need cleaning somewhat more often than larger ones would) even an 1/8" wide cut made with a dry diamond blade will move water through a high spot (I've done that) to a sump/drain, and greatly ...


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Take and angle grinder and cut out the metal as much as you can. The part sticking out isn't doing anything. Use an epoxy concrete kit to fill in the gap. Skim on a layer of concrete patch - to even out the corner and cover epoxy. I would not just fill this with a concrete patch. It will even pop out of that gap. The skim layer may eventually ...


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Too long for a comment: I like to reduce high spots because I have found with moisture most self leveling compounds just don’t last , a 4” angle grinder is a handy home tool and can be used to cut a trench or with painstaking work grind it all down, inexpensive grinders start at ~30$ and pro versions can be close to 200 for a 4” , going up to a 9”angle ...


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This is commonly done and is done so using self-leveling concrete or cementitious products. These can be found at your local home improvement center. The basic idea is that water, as a liquid, will always be level and the leveling compounds are very thin and act like water to become flat as you pour and spread it over the unlevel surface. Then they harden to ...


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I have not removed a overlay but I have put a few down and if the epoxy was dry in that area it might come up easy with a pressure sprayer but a section that has plenty of epoxy will be a bugger to grind, a commercial tile chipper it is like a heavy pole blade that cycles back and forth it will probably do a better job.


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Attaching ledger boards to a steel reinforced reasonably thick (12” or more) concrete pad is standard practice in deck construction. Use 4 1/2” concrete anchors 18” apart in a zig zag pattern - per engineered drawings for my high end deck projects


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1) Part of the wall will be built on what is currently dirt in a planter area; the rest of the wall will extend onto existing pavers. Do I need to pour concrete in the planter as a foundation, level with the pavers? Or can I get away with compacting crushed gravel as a base in the planter? You'll need to do 'something' to deal with the overturning and ...


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There are many types of concrete anchors available. Have you looked into them? Which you choose partly depends on the tools you have available. However, I'd consider freestanding shelves attached to the framing above. Since your plan is to use lag screws already, why not use anchors designed to accommodate them? This way you can use the same screws ...


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You can get both, the reduced work of the concrete and the look of brick. This is done by modifying the surface of concrete to look like brick. There is more than one way to do this including those listed below. This is not a good DIY project through, it takes a lot of skill, needs to be done quickly when the concrete is ready and before it dries too much, ...


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I'm going to get on the band wagon that this isn't a good idea. I'll add a bit of a new take to the why's already provided, and that this would be very hard to maintain to get the look that you see in the posted picture. That picture is the ideal condition, the best they could make possible make it look. And therefore all the other times it will look less ...


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I mean there are plenty of driveway that get installed where they spend a lot of money prepping the ground and these driveways have failures. What makes you think that you have some special case? If you do what you are saying, every single one of your pavers will be at a different height in 5 years. If you are lucky they will only be off by 1/8-1/4" but ...


2

If this was just a patio I'd say you have a good chance of getting some satisfactory results except for the fact that it would be about 2.5" above grade and there's be the possibility of tripping over it. This is a parking lot and driveway. You'll have cars driving over these slabs and parking on them. They will be shifting and sinking because of the weight ...


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You can drill the hole after 24 hours, but it would be better to wait an extra day. In addition, the insert you use to hold anything down will readily break free if you tighten it down, even after 2 days. It would be better to wait a week before any kind of real torquing down of any kind of fasteners. If you are only needed to keep a plate from moving ...


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If you drill too soon after pouring I've found that it tends to flake and crumble around the drill bit giving you a much larger hole than desired. After 24 hours, which makes it fairly hard, you should have no trouble at all.


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No it's not necessary. Sealers protect the concrete aesthetically and help keep it from soaking up oil etc. Since you don't care what it looks like then you don't need to seal it.


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From what you've described there are no issues popping up directly, however it does sound like you might be considering not getting a permit. I strongly suggest that you do so for many reasons. A few important ones: the jurisdiction will likely have pre-designed deck details for you to use you will be able to sell your house (you'll have to claim that all ...


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If I had a floor with cracks and known water issues I would do one of the following: Cover the floor in something like - DRIcore Subfloor Membrane (not recommendation just example). Then add either engineered wood or carpet on top (if carpet you probably do rigid insulation panels. Pure vinyl click lock. Don't confuse these with run-of-the-mill vinyl ...


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Gravel-lok is the product. It joins the pebbles without creating wierd color films or sandy debris. There is a spray on kind, but the can is a mixture you fold in like dough. The pavers would then be placed atop and a rubber mallet tapping would secure then let cure et voila wet look shiny perma pebbles.


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The amber stuff looks like construction adhesive. Particularly Liquid Nails. If the void is not load bearing and protected from moisture, then you can fill it with just about anything. The foam filler is a good choice since it's easy to use


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ok so don't be so discouraged and give it a try. Maybe mix a small amount of cement and try it out somewhere else like a box lid and practice your timing and skill using the trowel. I have never touched concrete anything in my life and helped my hubby last yr with this exact repair! We got a smooth finish with just enough texture to sweep easy but keep ...


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Mount a 24" piece of 2x6 up there with four 3-1/2" lag screws and 4 2" lag shields, one in each corner.Then screw the bracket into that with two 1-1/4" lag screws. Use 3/8" lag screws for the header and bracket. Center the 2x6 over the hole in the concrete, Screws should be about 1" down and over or 1.4" diagonally from each corner. Washers are a good ...


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