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Yes, of course you can cut a trench through your concrete floor. Be sure that you locate any existing wires or pipes that are in the path of the cut. A concrete saw with water will keep the dust to a minimum. Using a wet/dry vac to immediately suck up the water/dust will also help. Be sure to seal off the space as best you can with plastic sheeting to keep ...


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If you look at the information on the manufacturer's web site, they are careful to say not to re-use the fastener, but they do not specifically say not to re-use the hole. https://www.strongtie.com/mechanicalanchors_mechanicalanchoringproducts/thd_anchor/p/titen-hd#ProductDetails I am a bit surprised and even find it odd that Simpson, whose instructions ...


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For a hole that diameter in concrete I'd strongly recommend a diamond core cutter. If it's a one-off operation, you can hire one, or you may even find a tradesperson who specializes in drilling such holes for builders and DIYers, using the right tool. Google is your friend. If it were brick or block, I'd look at buying a "longest" small diameter drill (...


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You could drill another hole from the other side. It takes a bit of careful measurement to get the starting points lined up, and you have to make sure to keep the drill straight... To make sure you're lined up, you could drill a small pilot hole with a drill bit slightly over 4" long. If your pilot hole connects with the hole from the other side, you'll ...


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I have found that using an inexpensive plastic container as a mold works quite well. Use painter's tape where writing and numbers will be and glue them to the tape, then trim the tape with razor knife close to the writing. (remember writing mus be backwards!) I prefer the fiberglass type concrete to the quickrete (rock and sand) type used for the two you see ...


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A 1.5" hole (38mm) in concrete is beyond any conventional drill. You might get away drilling empty block, but not a foundation. I'd suggest renting a big rotary hammer drill driver for this job. Most rental places are happy to rent you a suitable bit for the task as well, on the basis if you didn't have the tool you're unlikely to have the proper sized ...


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If you are using a core bit with a shaft for which there's an extension, you'd probably have thought of that already. As far as I know there's no extension available for SDS plus or SDS max shanks. There are extensions for the "rope" threads and for the 5/8" and 7/8" threads on diamond core bits. The John Henry method is to drill as far as you can, then ...


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I have extended drills for one-off jobs by soldering (or welding / brazing) a piece of pipe (of a suitable diameter) to the end of the drill and putting an old drill into the other end of the pipe for the drive end. Need to go slow as they tend not to be perfectly straight :) but have got the job done...


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All sealers that I have worked with require a clean, dry, scale free, dust free surface. A vacuum cleaner should do the trick. As far as pre-coats, and "how to apply", you need to follow the directions on the particular sealer you're using. They all have their own specifications. Many sealers can be painted over, check the specs for your sealer. Certain ...


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This is probably just a good comment but I would highly suspect that the old wall is providing zero support. Just because things are connected to it does not mean that it is supporting those things. Given that a new basement was poured there is a 99% chance that they pushed those walls up to provide load support to the entire house. Since this was ...


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The stains are minor, but may get worse over time due to moisture seeping through the porous concrete block from the outside. In order to have a dry basement, it is usually necessary to waterproof the foundation from the outside. This is generally not a DIY project since it involves digging all the way down to the footing in order to access the foundation ...


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I did exactly what u describe. Take a circular saw with a diamond blade and cut into the concrete on the outside of the pipesize. Small increments at a time. Cut the complete depth of the blade. Than take a concrete hammer and get rid of the inside between ur two cuts. If u have to go deeper just continue with the hammer. Add the pipe and new metal ...


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The orange stain is likely an iron ochre infiltration due to high levels of iron in the soil or pre-existing iron in the cinder block. More info The paint is simply making the orange much more visible than it was on bare cinder block. I highly advise reading this article on basement finishing before continuing to paint your basement. You will likely have ...


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Almost certainly for drainage. Carrying any water leaking in from the walls to the sump. My understanding of radon mitigation would be that this gap and the sump pit need to be sealed from the top and power vented to the exterior. Any underslab drainage on the "basement" side should be connected to the vent system as well. If you already had a radon ...


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You probably can fix this without having to damage the wall. This is a common problem, and there are inexpensive tools designed to remove any pieces of the shower arm left inside the wall in the fitting. You might be able to borrow one, but similar tools can be bought for less than US$10. Check your local hardware store or plumbing supply store. Unscrew ...


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1. Grab a flashlight 2. Find the service panel 3. Cut the power on the main breaker (or the top 6, or all of them) Now you'll need the flashlight. OK, now look at the panel labeling, and see if there are obvious "lighting" circuits. If there are, turn them back on, one at a time. After each one, walk around and check to make sure this didn't also turn ...


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I think you answered your question when you stated "some type of plaster". That's exactly what it looks like to me. Plaster is usually applied over lath strips but can be applied straight to concrete but it doesn't last as long and is prone to crack, chip and damage to moisture. It is relatively easy to patch by just mixing more plaster, according to ...


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As has been noted, if you can safely access the circuit breaker (usually a large panel on a wall looking something like this: I would flip the breakers to the appropriate rooms. They should hopefully be labelled to identify which breaker goes to which rooms. Note that sometimes a room can have multiple breakers to it. If you are really concerned you can ...


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According to Confast, one manufacturer of such anchors, you are supposed to: "insert the double expansion anchor with the nut first into the hole" By "nut first" I believe the narrator must mean the threaded end. (Source: https://youtu.be/LNz6IaM9BK0?t=102 linked to from https://www.confast.com/how-to-install-double-expansion-anchors) The Confast ...


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The OP added this in a comment: I never heard back from Quikrete from the email support request so called the customer support number and the guy was very helpful. Answer: Yes. Multiple coats can be applied. Restrictions - wait 24 hours. Pour additional applications up to 1". I was envisioning the stuff freely flowing all over the floor ...


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To address the vapor barrier aspect: With some materials you have to be careful about sandwiching them between two vapor barriers which can trap moisture - but concrete is not one of them. Adding a vapor barrier before new concrete is a good precaution if you're unsure if one exists already. Closed-cell foam insulation can itself act as a vapor barrier (I ...


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Setting bolts in wet concrete is a standard practice, and using a board to hold them in place is a good idea. You absolutely do not need any epoxy when setting into wet concrete. I don't know what effect that would have, but its certainly redundant. Epoxy is used when setting anchors into preexisting hard concrete which has been drilled. Generally you ...


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I've had to do this in the past in a very similar situation. We used a 'diamond' cone angle grinder wheel, like this: Image of one in use: The first step was to pull off as much material by hand or with a scraper / flat shovel, so we were mainly grinding only through the adhesive. The grinder literally takes off a very thin layer of concrete so the ...


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Be sure you're using the right size drill. If you are then your mortar/brick material might not be suitable for tapcons. As critical as railings are, I'd suggest lag shields and lag bolts. I've always used the stainless steel lag bolts for outdoors but galvanized are available too.


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