New answers tagged

0

With the existing pipes: It looks like you have sink and toilet drains visible. The orange cap on the stub coming from the narrower vertical pipe is probably for a sink, and the large pipe in the floor is probably intended for a toilet. So I agree with a commenter on your question; if there's a shower drain plumbed at all, it's probably under the concrete. ...


1

The answer is no. To be considered a finished basement there must be a wall covering around the "finished" part of the basement. If it were just concrete, well that is an unfinished basement. I have seen a lot of goofy things done including adding a 1/2" of plaster to all of the outer walls, putting drywall on basically shims, adding faux ...


1

Finish it anyway you want. Attaching fasteners to the wall for hanging TV's pullup bars, vaults for your gold bullion collection won't be a problem. You may want to paint the wall. Black maybe


2

Self-levelling cement can be quite expensive. You might want to fill the deep gaps to the level of the rest of the floor, and then top (the whole mess) with a self-levelling product if that's your desired end-result. If you are just "cleaning up the basement" and don't have some plan in mind that calls for a very flat floor, you might also consider ...


0

Just noticed this question was never answered, but I did wind up closing everything up later that year and never had any issues. I sold the house earlier this summer (2020). I figured that, if rigid foam insulation was acceptable, then any kind of moisture barrier would be, too. The rough texture of the cinder blocks and mortar joints would allow for at ...


1

Looking at Mattias' article on woodgears.ca, I think you can hang the uprights from the overhead floor joists and cut them off above the floor. The 2x4s coming down the wall provide a method to affix the shelving unit to the wall, not provide support from the floor. Some of the other contributors have "half-height" shelves pictured that only come ...


0

Screw into the floor with galvanized brackets. Attach the 2x4 to the brackets with a gap. Prefably install a rubber flashing product to the bottom of the 2x4 and then use like a polyrurathane adhesive to further prevent wicking


1

My thought is that the Laundry line (up between the joists) might be what you really want to tap into for a wet vent in this situation, as opposed to dropping into the main line. 4DFUs of drainage in a 2" pipe is what you have (washer plus laundry/utility sink, each 2 DFUs), and is the maximum amount allowed for a wet vent of that size. Buys you a few ...


0

I solved a similar problem with a vent line going thru an interior wall to an unconditioned space. I tore down and removed all the old pink insulation. cleaned up everything, dried off the duct. I cleared around both ends of the duct work (within in unconditioned space) and well insulated any air gaps around it's entry thru the wall of the floor. An then ...


1

If the ducts do not have sealed air spaces at top and bottom when the ducts get cold the air around it becomes cold. Cold air is denser and heavier so it drops, pulling in fresh humid air from the attic or other airspace. As the air cools with the moisture condensing on the duct and it starts all over again. Sealing the areas the ductwork goes up the walls ...


0

If the duct goes up through outer walls, how much (if any) insulation is around the duct in the wall spaces? Sounds like cold conditioned air duct meeting warm wet outside air and causing condensation on the outside of the duct, because the duct is buried in a wall and that probably leaves very little, if any, space for insulation around the duct. That ...


3

If that's your plumbing layout, presumably it would overflow at the basement laundry sink if it was going to overflow with the floor drains successfully valved. Whether it would will depend how much pressure there is - while your flood was only a couple of inches, it was spread out from two floor drains across however much basement area it flooded, so there ...


2

A smaller (non-oversized, might be another way to put it) air conditioner can in fact be much better at removing humidity than an oversized unit that runs for short periods and shuts off. That is, in fact, one of the problems of "going big" on an air conditioner - it keeps up on the hottest days, but most of the time it means you're danker than ...


2

I don't think you can build a slab that can prevent radon from entering. The vapor barrier under the slab is what keeps the radon and other soil gasses out. It is really difficult to have perfect seams in the vapor barrier (there are wall seams, seams around post footings, etc). Typical modern requirements for areas known to have high radon levels are for ...


3

Concrete is Porous this is why we put vapor barriers down and foundation drains because if there is moisture it will permeate the concrete. Doesn’t that mean the foundation is not done correctly? No concrete is porous and if moisture can make it through it is much easier for a much smaller substance to make it through. Not only can it come just through the ...


2

As I understand it, you cannot possibly "tighten" your basement enough to prevent radon from getting in, there is no way to attain a radon level of zero.


36

This gives all the impression that is was designed and installed to support the basement wall that the "arrow" of the diagonal bracing points to. The vertical post against that wall is what was put there to support that wall. The bottom of that post is most certainly held up against the wall securely by the bottom plate in that wall which is likely ...


-2

Yes code requires all devices " used in the conveyance of heat or cold air be properly sealed, insulated and protected. Such devices include, sheet metal duct, flex duct, aluminum flex duct and any and all others. The purpose is to retain heat and air with minimal loss thereby reducing energy usage. Failure to comply is punishable with a $2,000 fine and ...


2

Both your answers are right but I think they are missing context. #1 yes screws are more optimal... But you will damaging the gypcrete as much with screws. So you are basically doing more work for slightly slightly more hold. #2 "Gluing" isn't a long-term thing for a basement. You should not be relying on glue for keeping walls steady. As the ...


4

I will agree with isherwood regarding the nails to jiggle loose rather fast, as the gypcrete doesn't have the compressive strength to hold them. The power-actuated is a no-no, as the holding capacity of those nails relies on 2 main factors: sintering between the steel in the nail, and the concrete, achieved thanks to the high temperature during the split ...


3

Both. A few nails to secure the location of the walls while the construction adhesive cures. Nails alone are likely to jiggle loose over time due to the soft nature of gypcrete. Penetration doesn't need to be more than an inch or so. Technically, construction adhesive isn't to be used as a structural fastener, but it'll do fine if augmenting occasional nails....


Top 50 recent answers are included