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1906 row house will have a combined rain and perimeter drain system probably vitrified clay tile. The pdrain surrounds the footers of the foundation and typically receives the rain water and any ground water that pools near the bottom of the foundation footer. The pdrain then takes this water away typically to the sewer main. Your pdrain is probably ...


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I have had issues with small springs under slabs, yes the dark spot is moisture. The tough thing if it is always there most sealers need the pad to be dry to seal properly. I have had really good luck on several of my own homes with 2 part epoxy applying in late summer. The worst place I would pull gallons of water out of my dehumidifier, once coated with 2 ...


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I don't see any cause for concern with your intended use of the area. However, things don't always work out like we plan. Therefore, a double-the-capacity Bath Exhaust Fan, Exterior Wall Fan or even a kitchen Range-hood (to be down much closer to your work...can be mounted to slide up and down) would be ideal. Such an exhaust can be switched on and off ...


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I don't see a problem with this. Use PT wood treated for continuous underground use. (Wood foundation treatment) You're using heavy timbers to the ground forces trying to squeeze in won't be an issue. You may get minor amounts of water squeezing between the boards, but with reasonable bottom drainage this isn't aproblem. The reason the galvanized ...


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It is covered if the event occurred suddenly and it is not covered if it occurred over time. Be careful when describing what occurred to your insurance agent. If they can prove (or at least contend) that it occurred over time, they will claim its maintenance. If you convey to them that it occurred suddenly, then it’s not maintenance and is covered. I ...


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The flooding is most liklely covered. Disappointing, though, that your sump pump didn't handle this. The mechanical repairs, I would expect not, since it's maintenance like replacing a roof. However you can always check, and also look into any home warranty that might have been part of the purchase. Well work can indeed be insanely expensive, but that ...


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The only person who will know for sure what your home owners policy covers will be your insurance agent. Best we could do is guess. I honestly have no idea. As far as the expense of repair, it depends on how much of the labor you can do yourself. Excavators aren't exactly cheap to rent, but they aren't thousands of dollars either. Pipe itself is usually ...


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How to run 10/2 THHN outdoor wire THHN = Thermoplastic HighHeat Nylon coated THWN = same but water resistant XHHW = cross linked polyethylene (i.e. PEX) for insulation = tougher than nylon https://wesbellwireandcable.com/Electricalwire/5-types-of-electrical-wire.html you imply stranded wire by saying THHN which in laymen's terms a single wire which per ...


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Individual wires of any kind require a conduit, raceway, gutter, etc. etc. Regardless, however you plan to mount those wires (draped from hooks?) would also be illegal if you were using cable instead of wire. There is no way to do this in the way you imagine. Homes need utility spaces. When people cashier those spaces to create additional finished/...


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You need a conduit. For that matter you would need a conduit if running them inside the ceiling space.


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I would run your cable through the floor joists, drilling per the manufacturer's allowed schedule. To get there, simply lay the cable on the face of that stud alongside the panel (or another block set over the wall framing) and staple it in place. You're allowed to have cable mounted on a surface like that if it's not likely to be damaged. I'd then drill ...


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I think the easiest solution is to cut the vapor barrier in the section(s) the outlets will be located in. Cut along the studs. The install outlets/wiring between stud/insulation. Then, simply cut a new vapor barrier section, tape to seal. You don't need to take the entire vapor barrier down (unless you don't trust the tape seal--which if true, I also ...


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If the plastic is only there to direct water down, it is not necessarily thick or durable enough to be a reliable vapor barrier. I'd recommend adding another vapor barrier just to be safe, because better safe than sorry. Alternatively use a mold-proof insulation, such as mineral wool.


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