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First that is one very interesting wall. Between the tube, the switched outlet feet in the air and the plumbing lines... completely distracts you from what seems to be a really poor support wall. Let's just stick to the facts of you need to install a french drain... You are going to have to build a temp wall a few feet over and carry the load from ...


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There aren't many options for framing cheaper than basic 2x4 lumber. You could go down to 2x3 which is sometimes cheaper but you'll find that interior doors and insulation are generally sized for 2x4 walls with 1/2" drywall. You could also consider metal studs. These are available down to 1.5 inches in thickness (fine if all you want to do is hide the ...


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Just wanted to come back and say my plan is now to remove the fiberglass insulation from the top half of the wall, cover the walls with foam foam board insulation (EPS) by threading sheets through the studs and at the large openings for my egress windows, then reuse the fiberglass in the stud bays (along with more I'll need to purchase). This approach has ...


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You have 1 advantage that the wall is only ~5’ below grade. Can it be repaired DIY yes, but this would be quite involved. I would suggest digging out outside the wall for 2 reasons: it would allow backfilling with gravel so it could drain and the hydraulic forces would not push it in again. The second reason a temp wall set inside to support the home will ...


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You cannot avoid a divot when pulling nails out of concrete small divots I use epoxy filler larger or a large number I use a self leveling compound or hydraulic cement. Vinyl flooring will show divots so they need to be filled.


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Are you sure there's that much clearance under the shower? I realize you have a 4" skirt but the floor usually drops back down to finished floor level. I would be concerned with those two 90's so close together. you'd never get a snake down there if you had a clog. If you're going through all this work for a shower, take the time to do the drain right and ...


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Silicone sealants are basically never a fix for leaky pipes. They almost always fail in that application, usually in a relatively short period of time. One common possibility to be on the lookout for is that "where you see the water" may not be "where the leak is" if it's running down the pipe in a thin enough stream that you don't notice it, perhaps on the ...


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Your drain might be backing up , a 1-1/2 or 2” sink dumping into a 4” drain should not have any back pressure . I see your arrows but can not tell why it would leak there , I would try a silicone sealer . If there is not a vent close to the sink this could cause issues but at the point where the size jumps would be a new one for me. If you run water for a ...


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Per Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code SPS 321.11, you should be good with 1/2” or greater wood structural panels (including structural plywood, note emphasis in quoted section below is mine): SPS 321.11 Foam plastic. (1) (b) Thermal barrier. Except as provided in par. (c), foam plastic insulation shall be separated from the interior of the dwelling by ...


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There are 3 considerations: 1) Fire Walls, 2) Flame Spread Index, and 3) Smoke Development Index. 1) Fire walls prohibit (or slow) the passage of fire from one room to another. Fire walls are used to contain the fire to allow a.) occupants to escape, and b.) contain the fire to protect the structure. In residential construction the only fire walls are ...


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You can do almost anything since it should be fairly dry on the inside side of the vapor barrier. Best would be some kind of material that can tolerate a little water and resists the flow of vapor. Any humidity in the basement air will tend to cool when it touches the vapor barrier and condense into water on the wrong side of the vapor barrier. Sheet ...


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I just called and spoke with the housing inspector who had been out here inspecting the contractor's work and he said that it's normal for some waterproofing material to make its way down into the foundation drainage system after a basement wall waterproofing job. He said that I will probably need to keep cleaning off the sump pump for another 2-3 weeks and ...


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Plumbing is not correct. You have a condensate drain that's been piped to the sump drain, and the check valve (black thing) is below it. But it would not work if the check valve was above it, either. (edit - perhaps that's just a coupling, not the common "check valve in a flexible coupling" I took it to be at first - does not change the answer.) The ...


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The "unused chimney flue as electrical chase" seems like an ideal solution to both "historical appearance issues" and roof to basement access. I can't see a code issue with that, if done properly.


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It’s difficult to see the shape (profile), much less the dimensions from the photo. Here’s Pemko’s 200 page catalog: https://absupply.net/pdf/PemkoFullCatalog2012.pdf Hopefully you can spend some time and find a match...or acceptable substitution. When you do, your local lumberyard can order it.


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Basements and every sleeping room shall have at least one operable emergency and rescue opening. Such opening shall open directly into a public street, public alley, yard or court. IRC R310.1 Egress must be available through a window to the outdoors, such that an adult can be reasonably expected to pass through to escape or to provide rescue. Down a ...


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You can not tie it into an existing clothes dryer vent. "The reasons being that you can't easily prevent backflow and you increase fire spread risk". ( Isherwood ). Do your joist bays not run to an exterior wall ? ( there are specific restrictions on how big a hole you can put in a joist. ) You can mount a made for a ceiling fan and route the duct to ...


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Yes you can mount the fan on the wall. if the wall exhausts to the outside it would be no different than a wall mount exhaust vent in the main floor bathroom. You cannot mount it on an internal wall and just dump the air into a stud bay (I have seen this tried and failed).


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Surprisingly, introducing water to the CMU will actually increase it's strength because you're providing more fuel for the chemical reaction that turns it from a liquid to a solid. The only time water will cause a structural issue with the CMU is if it susceptible to frost. If you feel the wall is wet on the outside of the building on a regular basis and you ...


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What your seeing is called efflorescence which are mineral deposits from moisture which sometimes seeps through exterior walls. Even though the basement walls may be inset from the main level water will migrate through soil layers. It appears that the other side of that wall is in contact with compacted soil. Even if it was water-proofed during construction ...


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That footing isn't that big. You glue it on. It isn't that big of a deal. The big deal is grinding out the protrusions. You don't deal with those and the bottom of your wall is going to look pretty wonky. I would run the drywall until may 2" above grade - give yourself some room for moisture and know that your flooring will take you up at least 1/2". ...


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