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Get a CO detector. See my comment about that. Nothing to do with the noise, just a good idea when living above a poorly maintained furnace. That cone-shaped thing you touch with the stick is to allow air from the basement to join furnace exhaust up the chimney. You can see it's joined to the flue stack at the top. If you turn off the furnace to make sure ...


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Wow, that noise is absolutely awful! It's obviously created by one thing vibrating against another thing; your pressure with the stick prevents the vibration. Ideally you'd dampen the vibration at its source, but that is probably inside the equipment where you may not want to venture. Is the sound created by resonance of the parts or by movement? If it's ...


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Could be a daylight drain for the laundry. It used to be legal to dump non-sewage into your yard. Look for an outside outlet at a lower elevation. They're likely to clog or collapse after 65 years, especially if unused. I'd consider dropping a generic grate panel over it (slightly larger than the hole) and framing the grate with termination molding to match ...


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In a rim joist it should be no problem but I would make it a tight fit, check the size of your outlet it may be 3” so the pipe will slide over it. I like the hole to be as small as possible I know the dryer vents I have installed for 4” pipe worked with a 4” hole. I don’t care for the corrugated or flex pipe unless there are several bends and even then only ...


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A metal C-clamp might be safer. The wide metal cover is a draft hood that permits the furnace exhaust gases to pull up extra air if needed to maintain an upward draft. Occasionally, a strong wind outside can push air down the vertical flue. If the furnace is running, then hot gases could be pushed back into the room. A thermo-disc safety switch is usually ...


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Assuming that the rattling cone is just a sheet metal skirt then you could attach some trigger clamps to the bottom of it like these: The clamp alone might stop the noise but if it does not then you could add a small weight plate or two to the bar: Just be careful to not break anything since it does appear to be an exhaust for gases including carbon ...


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We had a similar 6” hole providing fresh air to our old boiler. We were able to pipe it directly into the new boiler and create a closed fresh air system for the boiler so that it no longer uses air from the boiler room but instead gets all the air directly from an intake pipe which thus sealed the hole.


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Just wanted to update that I went down into the basement to get laundry before we left for vacation 2 weeks ago and the duct was dripping again in the same spot. It was a weird rainy day around 70, the air was set to 73. Last night the conditions were similar and it was also dripping. I have the dehumidifier set to 50% but turned the fan up to medium. I ...


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If there are individual dampers close them down as other have suggested but also block off part of the return air duct. these normally do not have dampers so a handy trick is to use plastic wrap , cling wrap and block part of the return. Aluminum foil will also work. You can close the vents totally off (not a good idea) and the intake will pull the cold air ...


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I can't see the entire crack pattern but it does appear to be one of the "back-of-an-envelope"-patterns that strongly indicate a structural issue. This in itself does not have to be much of a problem, but it means there is a real risk that it will continue to grow. And if you try to repair it by injecting mortar or epoxy, it may very well reappear. ...


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There are a lot of houses that are built on soil that only requires a footing the same thickness as the foundation. If the footing is the same width as the wall you could technically claim there is no footing. The width of the footing is based on the load of the house and the bearing capacity of the soil. Often 100 years ago basements weren't for living in ...


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I'm afraid I have some bad news for you. Someone did a hack-job. Sadly, this isn't uncommon in the waterproofing world. There's a lot of hacks. It's unfortunately an industry where charlatans and honest businesses are difficult to differentiate, since the work is all hidden behind concrete and the company is long gone when the problem re-occurs. The ...


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Your basement is not nearly as sealed as you think. Which is actually a good thing. You need to constantly have make up air. That is air to replace the air you breathe. Otherwise, while your H2O is going down (thanks to the dehumidifier), your O2 is also going down and your CO2 is going up as you breathe. I am not going to do the math, but just think "...


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