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In addition to JACK's answer that both the screws on the handles and the [nut] things underneath loosen counter clockwise... The screw that actually holds the rubber washer on actually loosens clockwise (reverse-thread)...At least the one for the hot water anyway. I still have to replace the cold side. See photos below for image of screw mentioned. Before ...


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This is likely a common "bibb" style valve, where the water comes through a valve seat. The water is stopped by a bibb washer on the end of a moving stem; the washer seals by moving up against the valve seat. The picture below shows a common bibb-style valve (yours would not be identical but same general parts and principle):


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Could the crack cause damage below on a lower floor? Absolutely most tile is inside the pan but the backer whatever was used is outside so if the water gets past the grout it can run down. I would say that little bubble looks like a bad tape job because there are no watermarks I can see. As far as that is concerned I would use a t pin or hat pin and pole ...


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This might sound strange but sometimes people inadvertently lean against the tank while sitting on the toilet seat. This can put pressure on the large gasket that is meant to seal the tank to the toilet. Even a new gasket can be compressed on the back side near the wall of the ring gasket which could cause leaks on the front side of the gasket. In the ...


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Both of those screws loosen counterclockwise. Spray some WD-40 on them and let it soak in for a bit. There is a washer or "o" ring at the base of the spout or in the base of the valve. hit that big nut with some WD-40 and turn it counterclockwise too loosen. you might have to loosen the supply nuts to get an adjustable wrench in there, a pair of ...


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No that crack cannot cause the shower to leak. There is a waterproof layer somewhere behind the tiles if that has holes that would cause a leak. the the mark on the drywall does not look typical of water damage, it looks more like a failed join. could be structural, could just be a bad mudslinger.


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This is a common problem in windy areas with rain. In many cases the leak is rain getting inside the pipe and running down. Based on your photo I would say this has been happening for a long time. I would want to call a general contractor that also dose roofing because the roofing only guys may not be the best at repairing the inside damage. The clean out ...


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As Alaska Man said, call a roofer. That b-vent likely exits the roof through a 4" flashing collar and resealing it or replacing it should not be an expensive roofing repair unless the roof is in bad shape.


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