New answers tagged

1

Put a drop of super glue on the bare shaft, then slide the impeller fully into place. Put the nut on without gluing it. Leave it for an hour so the glue can set up. You could also use a threadlocker liquid on the shaft. I have repaired loose impellers for combustion air fans inhigh efficiency furnaces. I also use this repair for bath fans and rangehoods.


2

I had the same problem, with the light protector broken a few millimetres from the thread so there wasn't much to grip to remove it. After trying a number of the suggestions here and elsewhere I ended up doing what I was hoping to avoid. I attacked it directly with a hammer. (Initially, I tried using a screwdriver between the hammer and glass but the glass ...


0

I'd add 2 horizontal pieces of 2x4 to the exterior of each side piece. One at the top and one at the bottom. These pieces would extend past the end of the foot board by 1.5". I'd then add two vertical pieces of 2x4 to the exterior of the foot board. Then I'd screw the verticals to the horizontals. Then I'd chip out all the broken crap and fill it with ...


0

First I'd try to cosmetically repair the footboard as good as possible with some wood glue, especially the top part. Then position the footboard like it originally was and drill through the sides into the footboard about 2 or 3 inches from the damaged areas and about 4" deep. Get yourself some lag screws and screw the bed back together. Normally I'd say to ...


2

That looks pretty busted up, and I'm guessing you want to fix it, and making it stronger than it was it more inportant than making it look good as new. MDF and chipboard are weak in edge-grain, so for durable connections screw into (and preferable through) the faces not into the edges. What you do is get some 20mm x 2mm aluminum angle that's as long as ...


2

I just had the same problem. My successful method was to warm the remaining glass and metal housing with a hairdryer, it took several goes to soften the grease etc. Then I had a small plastic tub of my granddaughters play-doh in a drawer which is around 2” diameter at the base and tapers towards the lid. By inserting that inside the broken cover, pushing up ...


0

I took a look at my own mixer, and as @JPhi1618 noted be sure to replace the grease after this repair. The parts supplier I used sold food-safe grease alongside the replacement nylon gear- the old gear got stripped to nothing by the previous owner and plastic was all over the gearbox. Anyhow, place the mixer on its side - That will take the tension off the ...


2

I recently purchased a brand new GE refrigerator and it was making a terrible noise about once an hour that sounded like a metal fan hitting something. Turned out it was because the ice maker was in the on position and the waterline hadn't been hooked up yet. However even when I called the store they didn't seem to know that would be why I was getting that ...


1

I don't think you really have plywood there. It looks like some OSB type mix with with a veneer - these were super popular in the 60s-80s. With the veneer off I am afraid that painting it or anything else is going to look bad and not last. Cardboard doesn't hold paint well. Since it is a laundry I would go with wainscoting. They make some super ...


0

Painting is going to be the best bet here. You could fill the cracks, then sand and prime and wallpaper, but thats more work and you end up with wallpaper. Prime the damaged areas, then sand. Focus the sanding on the edge of the damage to smooth it as much as possible. Then prime again and sand any additional roughness that appears. That fiberboard will ...


3

Which valve is this? Hopefully it's not the main valve to your home. Can I safely assume you wish to avoid a propane torch and solder? Assuming that you can turn off the main water supply and assuming you never plan to actually use this valve then I would highly recommend cutting out that section of pipe and replacing it with two SharkBite push-to-connect ...


7

It is absoloutely possible to DIY plumbing in most cases, but it pays to take some time to fully understand the situation before you start. The first thing I would do is evaluate the broader situation. What does that valve feed? where is it fed from? Is there another shutoff valve upstream? Does the upstream shutoff valve work? Does the upstream shutoff ...


16

That's a soldered valve, with a drain cap (typical for things that you might drain for the winter after shutting them off, though not always employed that way.) Replacement is not the only solution, and may not be the best option. The packing nut leak (right side) might be as simple as using a pair of wrenches to slightly tighten the nut on the handle ...


1

This is probably just a good comment but I would highly suspect that the old wall is providing zero support. Just because things are connected to it does not mean that it is supporting those things. Given that a new basement was poured there is a 99% chance that they pushed those walls up to provide load support to the entire house. Since this was ...


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