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The good news is that the gap is limited to a small area of the window. Possibly it got wet inside and the wood warped a bit. Hence the massive application of caulk. Maybe the previous owners didn't always shut the window when it rained. I would re-caulk it and paint it. It doesn't look structural.


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I've had my Kenmore for 26 years I put 3 elements in it 3 belts last one 6 years ago and I've never put a dropper grease or any kind of lubricant on it and it still blowing heat spinning like a top


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Depends on whether you want to do it yourself or not. If so, rent a dumpster/skip "for construction debris" and start with removing the rotten mess, which needs to be done either way, and will save you some money if you end up deciding to hire a professional after doing that. Then solve the water problems (rot does not happen without them.) Then ...


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Toggle Bolt will fix almost all towel racks that come loose from drywall! Extremely simple fix unless the hole is very large then you need to drywall patch and then I’d still probably use a Toggle Bolt!


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I can't see the entire crack pattern but it does appear to be one of the "back-of-an-envelope"-patterns that strongly indicate a structural issue. This in itself does not have to be much of a problem, but it means there is a real risk that it will continue to grow. And if you try to repair it by injecting mortar or epoxy, it may very well reappear. ...


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That grey substrate is the base coat of plaster, you need to check if the base coat is still attached to the lath, put light pressure on the spot, to see if it flexes. If the base coat can be flexed, it means there is a gap between the lath and plaster, and you should remove that part. You need to use something stronger for patching a base coat, I recommend ...


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There's a tool for just this sort of thing: a sprinkler riser extractor. The pointed tip is pressed into the broken-off threaded part and turned counter-clockwise. The splines on the tool dig into the walls of the plastic part and cause it to rotate. Thanks goes to Lowe's and to Orbit for the photo.


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No, not in less than a month. Use a bench grinder, angle grinder , belt grinder , etc. ,anything except a Dremel. Because it is only 12" long , it could probably be done manually with coarse rasp or bastard files.


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Another pic showing the overall door trim profile might help but the close up is valuable. From the little section of the wall that I see, if it were my house I would razor knife the white paint at the point where the trim meets the wall. If it falls away.... good. If it doesn't, maybe the next step may clear it off. Which is to remove the raised line of ...


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Is it reasonable to just cut it away with a utility knife and then spackle over? Yes, except for instead of spackle most painters would use a paintable water-cleanup caulking. You simply lay a thin bead of caulk along the crack, smooth it with a damp sponge or rag, then paint over it.


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You can fill a hole, and then re-drill it for an anchor.If you use a standard weight setting compound, and not all-purpose pre-mixed or lightweight compound, you should get something close enough to the strength of the original drywall. It would actually be stronger, if you didn't use a sandable compound, but a sandable setting compound would get it close ...


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You don't repair it, you patch it, and don't use the toothpaste. I have seen repairs done with a small bead of caulk. You can rub it in good and then clean up the tile. This looks like hell. You could also use some white or clear acrylic nail polish and carefully go over the cracks. The problem is someone probably cracked that tile by kicking it and it could ...


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Late to this party. I have found that chopsticks are a cheap and simple solution for larger problems like doors. Toothpicks work great for smaller jobs with smaller screws but are sometimes not enough for heavier doors. Dowels are better but chopsticks work great. Since they are tapered, I just insert the skinny end into the hole and tap with a hammer ...


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This seems like an impossible question to answer based off of this one picture. If you can't afford to replace it and it's not in dangerous condition, then I don't see why fixing the problem areas wouldn't be your best temporary solution.


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No, I don't consider that repairable. Enough metal corrosion has occurred that entire assembly is suspect and at risk of failure. The good news is that it's a fairly easy repair if you have access. If you'd like help with that, post some photos. No, the metal parts won't damage your pipes. They're probably already out at the street.


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I can purchase a new 25 lb cylinder of R410A online 160$ Brand new 5 ton outside unit 1700.00 includes shipping. how many ton is the system? Goodman is a low cost system but if properly installed it should last 10+ years, If there is a leak it was small the system is still cooling right. you wanted a second opinion if the unit is smaller the cost is less. ...


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The NEC rules requiring UL (or equivalent) only apply to equipment such as a junction box or light fixture. This is not equipment. This is a component of equipment. You are attempting subunit repair of what looks like a light fixture. This isn't the whole fixture, just a component, looks like a socket. Suppose Joe manufactures light fixtures and seeks a UL ...


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A screwdriver (suitably small/thin) A wire An ice-pick (right, nobody but old folks has those) A nail Pretty much anything that fits through the slot and allows you to lever up the latch bar. That will be easier if you can hold the door in such a way that there is little to no pressure on the latch. Point the tool of whatever sort downwards as you push it in,...


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