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2

There's no need to go buy, haul, move and store heavy, scratchy things. Find some buckets or totes or jugs and fill them with water. They won't risk damage to your tub, are free, and can be easily handled.


1

Pick up 5 or 6 8"x 8" x 16" cinder blocks at your home store. They weigh about 35 pounds each. Position them around the shower on top of a towel and caulk with a quality silicone caulk after removing all the old caulk. Afterwards, you can always find some use around the house for the blocks. Good luck.


2

That is way out of plumb... but don't worry, there are solutions. You need a shower enclosure that has 2-piece side frames. They are designed so that the outer piece that the door(s) butt up against when closed can be adjusted by sliding them into a "U" shaped channel that attaches to the tile:


3

Many shower doors have adjustment built into the frame or stiles at the wall. Usually the door fastens to a box section with sits tightly into a 'C' section. Once the door is fitted and adjusted the box section is 'locked' into place by drilling holes into the box section through pre-drilled holes in the 'C' section. Small self tapping screws and plastic ...


3

Almost any such door has a range of adjustment or applicability, often in the form of panel lap. Tiled openings just aren't that precise. Look at the installation manuals for any models you like. They'll tell you what the range is. For example, this one specifically lists 56-60". Up to 4 in. of adjustment for width, if needed


3

To long for a comment My niece is disabled and uses a wheelchair no curb shower pans are easy but remember the pan is now going to be 2-4x the size of a normal shower. We used a glass brick wall on the center to divide the bathroom up because the large unusual size. For her shower the floor has a slope from the opposing wall all the way back to the drain. ...


1

basically you build the whole room like it's a shower (but you only need th waterfproof the floor and the walls near the shower) usually what's done is to slope the bathroom floor towards the shower drain (either the whole bathroom or just the part near the shower. This is typically accomplished by raising the whole bathroom floor using mortar screed to ...


0

I had a proper look at this a couple of weeks ago, checking the head, and pipe connections to the wall, and nothing looked amiss. I cleaned the filters, and any loose parts, put them back in, and still had the same problem. I did however notice by chance when testing it, that if I didn't turn the pressure (or power) tap fully round, it would still give a ...


1

If I need to make a proper shower bed with a slope I only would use thinset, self leveling compound will try to eliminate the needed grade or slope by leveling (I.e. no slope). So use thinset.


-1

Honestly... take a 1/8th drill bit and drill through. If that's not enough then go to 1/4"


0

Could the crack cause damage below on a lower floor? Absolutely most tile is inside the pan but the backer whatever was used is outside so if the water gets past the grout it can run down. I would say that little bubble looks like a bad tape job because there are no watermarks I can see. As far as that is concerned I would use a t pin or hat pin and pole ...


1

As another suggestion, you might look at converting the entire bathroom into a shower, in essence (aka doorless shower or walk-in shower). This would involve a couple of things: you'd need to make sure that water coming from the shower would go down the drain, so you'd need a very slight incline towards the drain. You'd also need to make sure that ...


0

Since it's going to be your own shower and there are a few things bugging you about it I think it's worth the 50 bucks to do it over and fix the things you are concerned with. If you don't, and you're anything like me, it will be nagging you forever that you didn't fix it. Enjoy your new shower either way.


-1

No that crack cannot cause the shower to leak. There is a waterproof layer somewhere behind the tiles if that has holes that would cause a leak. the the mark on the drywall does not look typical of water damage, it looks more like a failed join. could be structural, could just be a bad mudslinger.


3

Curved curtain rods virtually eliminate this problem. I installed one in each of my last two homes and consider them a standard thing now. To prevent the curtain from falling out and leaving you with a wet mess: Horizontally align the brackets roughly with the inner face of the tub Vertically position the brackets so that, with your choice of curtain ...


2

Shower curtain weights The weights for your shower curtain can help prevent from billowing on and keep it in place to get more shower space for you. You can position them on bottom or further up depending on what works best for you. Features & details • Shower Curtain Magnets: The magnet is glued on the crystal glass, total 3 pairs (6 packs)...


5

This is at least easy to try: Go to a place that makes vertical blinds. Buy a handful of the steel plates they use to keep them hanging straight. Pick up some 3/4" diameter disk magnets. Put plate on one side of curtain, and a magnet on the other. If this works, then buy a can of that vinyl goop that you dip tool handles in. Dip the plates into the ...


4

I think squeezing in enough caulk will fill the gap. You can tape part of the opening to seal it so that you can build a bit of pressure up in there to fill all the crevasses. It’s important to seal it from the inside too if you can, however keep an eye on the area for a couple weeks, especially right after you do the repair.


1

The short answer As others have said in comments, the slope of the shower - called the "fall" - is the most fundamental thing to get right. You need a gentle fall from the edges of the shower to the drain on all four sides, so that any water immediately flows to the drain. This is "bathroom installation 101", and an installer who does not know this should ...


2

What you are calling a white pipe is likely the body of the mixing valve. The installation as it is now looks carefully done: a nice circular hole, and a schluter kerdi seal around the hole (the orange plastic ring inside the hole). I wouldn't jump to the conclusion that it sticks out to much. You probably just bought the wrong brand of handle. You're best ...


1

If you cannot cut the pipe back I would make a spacer. I would make it a couple of inches larger than the cover plate the same shape (if round make the spacer round) by making the spacer larger and the same shape it will look like it was planned for decorative reason instead of a mistake. If you need multiple layers make each one larger by a similar amount ...


1

Stating the obvious - Your issue is that there's a significant difference in pressures of the hot and cold supplies to the shower. This means that the 'sensitivity' of the two valves i.e. the change in flow for a given angle of opening is different, so that makes it difficult to control. Using a monoblock mixer instead of separate taps in this situation ...


1

Note: this answer is based on my experiance in the UK, I do not know if this are the same in the rest of the world. Traditionally the "temperature" control on an electic shower did not directly control temperature, instead it controlled flow rate. For a given input water temperature and heating power, a lower flow rate resulted in a higher temperature. ...


1

The fact that the water drained out is good news. This means there isn't a large volume trapped in a stud bay. I would dump some silica beads in there to absorb moisture and keep the fan running. If you get it dried out fairly soon you won't have mold (or much mold), and there won't be a need to demolish the walls. Leaks occur in homes all the time, and ...


1

Chances are very good that the inside of the wall is just "regular sheetrock", and that will have gotten very wet. That fan setup is pretty cool and should dry it out since you were smart enough to cut a hole in the ceiling. Mold grows in areas that get wet and take a long time to dry. If you can quickly and completely dry out a surface, it should be fine....


1

If that's 1/2"npt on the valve, then they make flow control valves for showerheads that should fit. Usually around $10. Just be careful, some are just on/off, and they look identical. Best to check with an experienced sales rep or read the back of you don't trust them.


0

I believe a more durable, water-resistant material is used for shower/tub/bathroom walls. (See Cement board.) You should definitely consider a replacement of the walls, and a full drying of the intra-wall space, especially depending on where you are. Using US-based locations, Florida and other humid locations may have serious potential for liquid-based ...


1

Get some of the Loctite Power Grab construction adhesive. This stuff grabs pretty good but you'll need to clamp it, prop it up, or duct tape it in place until the adhesive hardens, Good luck


0

That's a tricky one, that back bracket is supposed to be screwed to a board, then the front part just unscrews. but without the board there pipes are likely to break if you try too hard to unscrew it.


0

Have you tried one of these? These are used for removing pulleys from shafts. You are likely going to need to sharpen the points to fit. With a 3 jaw puller it's often useful to wrap a stretchy cord around the jaws to keep them from slipping off a narrow edge. The end is either a 1/2" or 9/16 end. use a socket on it.


2

I have two heads in the master, I don't remember any charge but I guess there was. You just add inexpensive shut-offs on each head , works fine. BUT , in the US , regulations require that these shut-off valves leak, so if you have a head turned off ,it will still drip. We usually have both on at the same time. It did take a couple trips to the "big box" ...


5

If you don't want both shower heads to be on at the same time everytime you take a shower, then yes you need 2 controls. If you don't care if both head are on, then one control will be fine.


2

There is no issue in sharing the neutral as it is on the LOAD side of the GFCI. Bathrooms do have specific codes which is pretty technical. I'll try to sum it up: All receptacles within a residential bathroom must be GFCI protected. If only one bathroom is being fed by a single 20A circuit, the lights and other small appliances like exhaust fans may also ...


1

Assuming that it hasn't been flexed or otherwise damaged so much that its rigidity is compromised, sure. I also assume that either you have as water barrier behind or are relying on a good tile job for moisture management. The cement board isn't usually a substantial part of the moisture envelope. I'd use the same thinset mortar you plan on using for your ...


6

Generally speaking, you don't want to have a fan/light - or more specifically, a light - on GFCI because if the GFCI trips due to something else on the circuit then you are in the dark. As I understand it (I am not an electrician, but I have seen other questions on this topic and I heard this from my own electrician years ago when he installed heat/fan/light ...


1

I have yet to see a mechanical "smart" valve which allows 100% hot water and adjusts it for less hot water once the temperature is too high. You would have to dive into digital solutions but I am not familiar with their internal mechanics: https://www.amazon.com/KOHLER-K-527-1CP-Digital-Interface-Polished/dp/B005ECLU2Q You could have a recirculation pump ...


1

Any fortified thin set will work. I have used colored grout with add mix several times for glass block shower walls. Once the mortar is cured I then seal it the same as any tile job. There are pre mixed glass block mixes it is usually white.


1

These shower controls seem to be common in the UK, I've never seen one in the USA. I'd be very happy to find one here. I expect importing one and connecting it would be a pain with the different pipe threads and sizes between there and here. One knob sets temperature (thermostatically to a specific temperature, so you don't have to fiddle with it each time, ...


3

These are also known as “thermostatic” valves and are used on showers, but also for hot taps in schools, hospitals etc to limit the hot water to a defined safe limit. This is usually around 46 degrees C.


1

That's a tempering, (or temperature-control) valve, usually they are used to prevent scalding, but they could also be applied to pre-mix the shower water.


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