New answers tagged

1

This type are usually only held by friction, so the contact should only be synthetic rubber. Try to cut behind it with a utility knife or a wire. the socket that holds the end of the rod appears to be held in place with a large screw, you could try unscrewing the socket and see if the screw is attached to the wall or to the contact pad. and see if with the ...


1

Well it appears to either be a threaded stud or screwed in from behind the tile. I would gently try 2 flat head screw drivers in the slots and see if I could get the center to turn. If its a threaded stud you will be able to grab the stud with pliers and it will twist out. If its screwed in from the other side (really hard to believe that it would be but I'...


4

From "boiler", "mains" and "electric shower" I gather you are in UK-influenced areas. I am looking for non fossil fuel heating for space and water. We want to keep the same pressure we get off mains as we do not like the low flow rate with electric showers. OK, seems like a bit of a values conflict, environmentalism without ...


0

I have a shower drain that was snaked a few months ago and has started having a very light back up again. It sounds like the original clog was only partially cleared and over the months it has accumulated enough hair/soap to become more blocked. It's not unusual to have to snake a drain two or three times to get the pipes cleared. I would snake it again, ...


2

Move to an area served by a nuclear power station and your electric instant water heater will be "non fossil fuel". Probably not what you're looking for. Move to an area with an abundant supply of geothermal energy. I don't know if there are home geothermal systems that can do instant hot water. I don't think so. But it's worth a look. More ...


2

Heating of water requires energy, and instantaneous heating of water requires instantaneous energy. In a residential setting usually gas and commercial electricity are the only available sources of instantaneous and "endless" energy to support indefinite/continuous water heating. Eliminating use of fossil fuel can be easy: use a heater fueled by ...


0

How high off the floor is that seam? If above the heavy "splash level" (maybe 4ft) you're likely ok without tape. Otherwise, are you willing to cut a bit higher? You could also chisel out a groove between drywall and tile, perhaps even just 1/8in thick and reaching up only 1/2in behind the tile, so that you can insert flat flashing behind the grout ...


0

Unscrew the holding ring. Pull the cartridge out. Turn it 180 degrees. Put it back. If the valve is made for it, then this will work. If not, then the cartridge will only go in one way and your shower is reversed. Note: Depending on age and water purity, the valve might be difficult to pull out. Using a build-up remover can be helpful. If you break the ...


1

The presence or absence of the shower seat has no bearing on the attachment method. The glass panel in your picture is attached to the shower pan by the two metal clips at the bottom. How, exactly, those are attached to the floor isn't evident from the picture, but they're probably either screwed in, held on by double-sided tape (not likely, but possible), ...


2

Rusty steel tubs tend to get worse, not better, nor even stop where they are. When it inevitably rusts more, you'll be ripping out any tiling you do now as well as the old tub. You can certainly try various rust-treatment nostrums, but I'd suggest just facing the tub replacement now as the more certain path to a tile job that can stay put on a tub that's not ...


5

It might be marketing, or it might be fact (or both!) but caulking that's designed specifically for kitchen/bath applications has an anti-microbial element. Assuming your existing roofing caulk isn't too old, it would probably work. It might stink more than expected for a little while. If it was me, I'd get a fresh tube of kitchen/bath silicone from a place ...


2

Do an online search for Basin Wrench. Available from just about anywhere.


1

Trying to epoxy a corroded part like that is unlikely to be effective. Depending on the make and style of tub faucet you have it's usually best to simply replace the entire faucet, diverter included. Most faucets such as the one pictured simply screw onto a stub that protrudes from the wall. If yours is similar you might want to replace it in its entirety. ...


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