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The maker of the door will give you the max and minimum opening it will fit in. Off the shelf shower doors, so they will fit varying sizes of showers will make up the difference by the lap/overhang of the glass on the hinge side of the door. This will only allow the door to open out, which is code. If the door is custom made, it would be possible to have it ...


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The weight of the doors is on the tub, and it's hard to find studs behind tile. That's why studs are not normally used for shower doors. However, since you know where the studs are, the benefit of using longer screws is that you can get away with drilling much smaller holes. Go for it. Drill just barely large enough for your screw through the tile and ...


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What you were provided with is the standard install hardware for shower doors. Most people don't know exactly where the studs are. You can definitely install the doors as recommended using the provided screws and anchors. Since you know where the studs are, you can use the longer screws but do not drill 3/8" holes, way too big. stick with the diameter ...


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You will be fine with the 1 1/2" screws. If you think about your install it's exactly what the manufacturer expects (99% of shower doors are tile over hardiebacker). That said if you are bothered there will be no harm in using longer screws with the same diameter.


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No floor is expected to be perfect level without extra efforts (apply levelling grout for instance). The mounts are designed to be fool proof (for uncertainty of floor levelness), and to ensure the shower base ends up in a leveled position, without overstress/distort the base from localized loss in contact due to floor irregularity. Hope this helps you to ...


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It will quite possibly ruin the waterproofing layer under the tile. It is best to let it set up, roughen the glossy surface of the tile and set new tile directly over the first. There will most likely need to be an extension ring added to the drain to get it to the new level.


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Are you sure it's not a star drive or Torx screw head? BTW, in addition to using screw extractors, which can be a bit fiddly and prone to breakage, I've found that some Torx drivers can be a tight fit for a partially-stripped Allen-head bolt.


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I had this problem on a moen. The plumber cut through the plastic cartridge between the handle and the valve and was then able to replace the cartridge and re-use the handle. For a stripped allen/grub screws I've had decent luck with micro grabit.


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You should be able to simply use a 2" x 1 1/2" abs slip bushing in the drain outlet, essentially turning that shower drain into an 1 1/2" outlet: NOTE- the authority having jurisdiction in your area might require a minimum 2" drain size for showers...


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You should be able to turn that brass colored knob counterclockwise and remove it from the stem or have the stem turn too and remove it from the diverter plate which should then drop out of the spout. Then examine it for any signs of corrosion or cracking. If damaged, a trip to a plumbing supply store might just do the trick for a replacement. You have to ...


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Anything called “water resistant” I’m sure will absorb moisture over time, including cement board. A quick Google search confirmed this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cement_board#Advantages


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Inside the cylindrical mixing valve - where the shower tube exits - are 2 back flow preventers. They can fail intermittently or permanently, or with any pattern in between depending on the pressure both of the cold and warm water net. Those parts are maintainance parts and should still be available. Normally the warm side back flow preventer fails first due ...


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You seem to be describing an anti-scalding device that is malfunctioning. This could either be a thermostatic valve (as you mention) or a pressure balance valve (another type of anti-scald device). They have been required by code for many years and while I cannot specifically tell if your shower valve has an anti-scald device in it, given that it looks newer ...


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One of the two heating elements in your water heater may be failing.


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There's a one-peice extension fitting that's a bit shorter. Might or might not be shorter enough; or too short. You'll probably have to order it or try a comprehensive plumbing supply. Search on 1/2" pipe thread extension and you should get results. Male threads on one end, female threads on the other, one solid piece. The other likely options would be ...


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I finally figured it out, the problem was different from what I thought. The real problem is that 3 of the 4 RP19804 I tried were defective. You could not adjust the temperature in small increments, any small change caused wild temperature swings. Putting a handle instead of a knobs helped a little, but the real answer was to keep trying valves until I found ...


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If you cap past a leaking shower valve, then pressure will build up in the outlet compartment of the valve which could lead to a leak inside the wall. The only solution to a leaking valve is to replace the sealing assembly inside the valve. Since you intend to redo the shower you may not want to go the trouble and expense of replacing the cartridge. Let the ...


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If the hose fitting can not be removed by you then i would advise you to remove the arm itself. Get a 6 or 8 inch long 1/2" galvanized pipe nipple and a 1/2" cap. Pre-Install the cap on the nipple with two pipe wrenches, use Teflon tape on the treads. Remove the arm and thread in the capped nipple into the fitting in the wall, Use Teflon tape on ...


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