New answers tagged

2

Neither. The rubber gasket replaces both. Plumber's putty is mostly obsolete these days (almost everything comes with rubber or neoprene washers) and can stain fixtures, and silicone is never a good material for joining water-bearing plumbing components. You could use PTFE tape as a secondary measure and a thread lubricant. Be sure to wrap it the correct ...


1

If there's a shutoff requirement a single valve will satisfy it. There's no need to use two. The kind that installs in a box in the wall behind the fridge are a little more intensive to retrofit but they're convenient to use. I can't speak to whether you might have state or local codes that require this in-wall style -- and I'll wager the Best Buy delivery ...


0

Great questions! Yeah, I agree that the 1/4" AIN'T RIGHT. Have him replace those sections. A body-spray setup needs all it can get. Being close to Ductwork is fine, the hot water is hotter than the ductwork will ever get. FYI, the Blue PEX is just coloring and is exactly the same as the Red PEX. However, PEX cannot withstand a furnace flue's/exhaust pipe's ...


0

I'm speaking out of turn here, since I don't know CA's Ordinances that might be beyond the Plumbing Code. But yes, you need a shut-off valve. Even laughable alarmist Home Inspectors still aren't jumping all over them...very surprisingly. Refrigerators were ignored for quite a while (almost 30-years as far as I've found), but with them essentially being ...


1

Those large "nuts" look like caps for 3/4" pipe that should have spigots on them. the two smaller "holes" in the wall appear to be the shut off valves for the pipes. Try removing those caps and experiment so you'll know what's what.


0

You need to supply some taps and check thsat the water supply is working. From what you show, it all seems to have been capped off during the re-plastering or painting. The installers will be prepared to connect to existing taps but not supply and fit taps etc The waste I would expect to be a bit higher but that also depends on the machine instructions. ...


0

In addition to JACK's answer that both the screws on the handles and the [nut] things underneath loosen counter clockwise... The screw that actually holds the rubber washer on actually loosens clockwise (reverse-thread)...At least the one for the hot water anyway. I still have to replace the cold side. See photos below for image of screw mentioned. Before ...


3

Yes, you want a water pressure gauge with a female hose thread. There are some on Amazon for less than US$10.


2

This is likely a common "bibb" style valve, where the water comes through a valve seat. The water is stopped by a bibb washer on the end of a moving stem; the washer seals by moving up against the valve seat. The picture below shows a common bibb-style valve (yours would not be identical but same general parts and principle):


0

This is almost a shopping question. Molecular sieve desiccant, the indicating type would be a non electronic method. This material you could put down kinda like round BB’s or small cylinder shapes . when it turns color Usually from white to blue it’s damp, over time the desiccant will turn colors and it can be put in the oven and bake the moisture out. Many ...


0

A clip or clamp on the hose will do nothing to keeping the hose "up in" a cavity. A pressure fitting is needed, that expands into the cavity. Check with the plumbing expert where you purchased the device. Use an appropriate length braided stainless steel covering hose. If you must use adapters, stainless is best. No bi-metal interactions that way. Else ...


2

Both of those screws loosen counterclockwise. Spray some WD-40 on them and let it soak in for a bit. There is a washer or "o" ring at the base of the spout or in the base of the valve. hit that big nut with some WD-40 and turn it counterclockwise too loosen. you might have to loosen the supply nuts to get an adjustable wrench in there, a pair of ...


2

With the boiler removed, if there is any water it will be minimal and not under pressure. Have some towels handy unless you want to go to the bother of figuring out where to connect an air hose or shop vacuum to the presumably disconnected pipes where the boiler used to be. And then have some towels handy anyway, but either of those will help get some of the ...


0

I believe the first answer does answer your question. However to modify the situation so that it meets code, you could turn the feed off the sink towards the back lengthen it to get within 4-6" of the wall. Install a 90 down to the input of a P running towards the drain where the 60 is at the same level or slightly higher for the output of the P to angle out ...


0

That trap is prone to siphoning. Against code. The critical trap arm length prevents the air path from the vent to the trap from being blocked. If the air path is blocked then the trap can siphon. The air path from the stack to your trap can be blocked given the weird 90s you have in that configuration. See image B: https://terrylove.com/forums/index....


0

Standard 3/4 line handles 10 gpm reasonably well. In your case you want the PRV as close to the water tank as possible. It doesn't matter really if you have a 3/4" PRV or a 1" PRV, the bulk of the pressure drop will be across the PRV valve, unless the valve itself isn't rated for that flow rate. Given Greg Hill's excellent answer with charts, you would ...


1

Three showers running simultaneously with a hypothetical flow of 2.5 GPM plus an unknown appliance sum to about 10 GPM. To explore the effect of up-sizing the PRV I consulted the spec sheet for an arbitrary PRV -- in this case, the Watts LF25AUB-Z3. It included a graph showing pressure drop vs flow curves for several sizes of valve. I've drawn lines on the ...


0

I realize that it's been two years since you posed the question and you've long since made a decision about what to do, but for the benefit of other people who run across this question, I thought that I would share my opinion on this subject. I just replaced my own regulator which failed sometime in the past year. A year ago I checked the regulator and it ...


1

Tip for anyone suffering from water hammer from neighbours washing machine...or banging pipes. I had horrendously loud water hammer from next door neighbours washing machine. I pushed foam behind the pipes to my boiler...now it is hardly hearble. Try that before going and buying an expensive water hammer arrestor


1

There is a special wrench that looks like the traditional rook chess piece (castle) It matches up with the cute cross bars that catch long hair, and the last bit of a bar of soap.


1

You said the plumber cleaned the pipes after the kitchen was installed. So some of the crud from the cleaning probably built up around and in the smaller kitchen drain. After a fe washes, the built up crud broke free and into the larger drain where more water would be traveling and washed it out. the chemicals could have had an affect on it too. you're one ...


1

One possibility is that by filling the tub basin, the height of the water provided extra pressure to move the clog. This can happen with slow draining: there's a constant stream of pressurized water flowing through the clog which starts to break it down. Plunging a sink is tricky because you have to have an airtight block on the overflow. It's probably ...


1

Happens here fairly frequently. Stationary tub and washing machine share a drain line. Tub isn't used much. Side flow from the washing machine refills the tub trap with dirty water. Eventually it gets enough crud that the drain slows. Use the sink, and the first 3-4 inches of water drain slowly, then it flushes the crud out. In your case, a slow ...


1

When the laundry drains, it pushes a slug of water with air in front of it. That air wants to go up, not "down" the main drain, which is one reason why the roof vents are there. Once the slug passes the branch where the roof vent is, the situation changes and the slug wants to pull some air behind it as it finishes it journey down the drain. This is the ...


0

I think it is burn-in of the heater from something inside the heat-exchanger since the wet side is a closed system. Believe I'm perplexed by the same problem, so let me expand to establish that we have the same complaint and I believe the same root cause. If those assumptions hold, our system similarities are of more interest and the differences are ...


0

This helped. I tried my handy dandy electronic tracing tool, meant for CAT5 wiring. This required some sandpaper to get a clean electrical connection through the rust. I was able to follow the pipe a good long distance, though not quite far enough:


6

Definitely a water pressure regulator. I had one of these installed when I bought my house because the water pressure in home was 100psi and I was told by a licensed plumber that plumbing supply is engineered to sustain 80psi max before things like leaks begin to develop over time. In my area building code dictates that a thermal expansion tank must also be ...


1

I used a pair of needle nosed pliers. Slid the ends into the tiny plastic indents and turned. Worked like a charm.


0

Hi Just replaced my Franke Sion Dual-Lever Mono Mixer Kitchen Tap ceramic disc. ONLY for six sided shoulder on valve. for older 2 sided buy special tool. Tools: 2mm Allen key to remove tap head. 14mm Socket (off socket set) thats all you need regards steve


0

10 years is a little more reasonable - they usually last at least 15 years. He might just be recommending it because if you don't do it now you'll probably forget all about it and it won't be changed until its failure causes problems. The regulators themselves are usually around $40 so it's not that big of an upsell compared to excavating and replacing your ...


1

125 psi unregulated is excessivly high water pressure. If this is true, it should be verifiable by simply contacting your local water district. as a plumber that tests water pressure regularly in several diffferent counties in northern California, I fear the pressure gauge might be faulty. it should always start at zero, if dropped it will damaged and give a ...


23

It's a pressure regulator. The screw at the top turns in (clockwise) to increase the pressure, and turns out (counterclockwise/anticlockwise) to decrease the pressure. The plug at the bottom (adjacent to the screw) can be where a pressure gauge goes for the low pressure side, but it's plugged off. The other plug towards the input is where you can loop back ...


3

judging by the shape it's a pressure regulator, the screw at the tip of the cone section adjusts the pressure.


6

One thing you can do regarding the question if it an active part of your plumbing is to turn on your water sources one by one. While water is running down the respective drain put your ear to this unknown vent pipe top and listen for the sound of running water. One way to make this process efficient is to have two people talking on cell phones. One person ...


1

What can be wrong ? You have a leak. You closed a valve this probably trapped the pressure in the tank so yes it would continue to leak. If it is a large old school pressure tank it may be close to rusting out and the drip is the warning. Old pressure tanks were usually ~5+ feet tall and about 2’ Across these were referred to as diaphragm tanks, modern ...


0

I've never seen a nut between the tank and the bowl. Seems like this could interfere with the seal of a thinner tank-to-bowl gasket as well. I have seen installations where rubber washers are stacked in between. I have seen installations with metal washers under the bolt head and the nut, as well as without. I don't think it's useful under standard tank-to-...


1

I chose to go with a suggestion from AskTheBuilder's Tim Carter, along the lines of @Greg Hill's answer. It unfortunately can't be done in galvanized due to the lack of a 22.5 degree fitting. But it can be done in ABS or PVC: Now I just have to worry about PVC deteriorating in the sun. See Is PVC an acceptable pipe for a vent stack through the roof With ...


5

There's typically a solenoid valve right down at the bottom where the supply line from your house connects to the fridge, and this valve is activated by the ice maker when it needs more water. Unfortunately, you've tapped in half-way up the back of the fridge - after the solenoid valve - so as a result, your coffee machine is only going to receive water ...


28

It is a flow limiter. The cistern will have an overflow pipe in case the inlet valve fails. In an area with particularly high feed pressure the rate of filling in such an event might exceed the rate of drainage through the overflow. To prevent the resultant flooding the flow limiter can be fitted. It's optional because if the feed pressure is poor you ...


56

This appears to do a few things. A backflow preventer. Note the nub on the "top", that should actually go down. Gravity and back pressure seats it on the inlet pipe to try to prevent tank water from backing up into the supply lines if there's a pressure loss or shutoff. A flow limiter. Without it the toilet will flow faster, but will be more ...


33

Looks like a fill valve regulator. Pretty sure the metal washer is at the top when you put it in. Its actually an optional thing, and leaving it out might be just fine. It's weird that it fell out though.


0

In terms of what kind of walkway to put back there, pavers (like brick or bluestone) could be easier to remove and put back in the future. You also can consider putting the pavers flat with the driveway, and having a step up to the porch, or vice versa, which gives you the opportunity to deepen the porch. A 10" slab is a lot of material to replace.


2

What you are calling a white pipe is likely the body of the mixing valve. The installation as it is now looks carefully done: a nice circular hole, and a schluter kerdi seal around the hole (the orange plastic ring inside the hole). I wouldn't jump to the conclusion that it sticks out to much. You probably just bought the wrong brand of handle. You're best ...


1

If you cannot cut the pipe back I would make a spacer. I would make it a couple of inches larger than the cover plate the same shape (if round make the spacer round) by making the spacer larger and the same shape it will look like it was planned for decorative reason instead of a mistake. If you need multiple layers make each one larger by a similar amount ...


1

Here's how I decided to plumb the traps. A straight 1ft section of 1 1/2" PVC was enough to get the AAV above the height of the strainer baskets. And I have enough room to get in there in the future. Had to get creative with making a double male union to join both female slip joints together where the santee meets the existing drain pipe, but it should ...


3

A pair of elbows of any angle can do the trick. For example, a 90 degree elbow can bend the vertical pipe so that it goes horizontally along the top of the wall. A second elbow connected to the first can redirect the pipe so it goes parallel to the rafter at any elevation/angle. I gave the example with 90 degree elbows but the same principle works with a ...


1

Stating the obvious - Your issue is that there's a significant difference in pressures of the hot and cold supplies to the shower. This means that the 'sensitivity' of the two valves i.e. the change in flow for a given angle of opening is different, so that makes it difficult to control. Using a monoblock mixer instead of separate taps in this situation ...


0

I recently updated the toilet in my 1930 farm house. I have found a similar problem if I don’t hold the lever down until the tank is empty. It will flush a few times and start plugging up again. I have found running water in the sink and tub helps break up the clog , I am guessing that the old cast is catching some of the paper or waste it builds up and not ...


0

6/12 pitch is 26.5 deg, not 22.5--so even if available I don't think that'd help you. Perhaps you could buy galvanized pipe and have a local welding shop create the 26.5 deg you need? I don't know but suspect the flex would not meet code. Vents must be air/water tight so that sewer gas cannot leak into the home.


0

It sounds like the clog is far enough down so that, given enough time to let the water drain out, there is enough room for one flush to enter the pipes fully before hitting the clog but not for any subsequent flushes. Like Nate suggested in the comments, your best bet is to snake it. Here is a how to: https://www.wikihow.com/Snake-a-Toilet


Top 50 recent answers are included