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Search popup click drain plug. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=popup+click++drain+plug&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images


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Seeing air bubbles usually indicates a problem with the vent stack that comes out your roof. The vent stack serves as an escape route for any air in the pipe to go when water and poo poo are put into the system. If it's not built correctly, or clogged, the air has to go somewhere, so it eventually makes its way up your drain. If you were the homeowner, I'...


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There's a very good chance it's caused by a blockage from a lower unit. You could try running a snake down your shower drain to see if you could clear the obstruction. Other than that, since it's a rental let the landlord know about this as other units might be affected. He should be the one to call the professional, not you.


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When I built my house 22+ years ago, I had to make the same decision. I chose the 5/8" since there was an "up-charge" for the next size larger which would be charged every month. The 5/8" meter has done a good job except when I tried to water my new lawn using more than 2 hoses connected to sprinklers. I noticed a drop in water pressure ...


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So far as I can tell 5/8 is a common meter size for residential water connections in the US. It'll often be connected to a 3/4 inch pipe. It's normal for the meter size to be smaller than the pipe size. Some utility providers charge a different base rate according to the size/capacity of the meter (or the pressure delivered, in the case of natural gas). If ...


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In some cases it may be rust scale or gravel in the valve , flushing the valve may fix it. Turn the supply off open the top of the fill valve some twist some have tabs. Remove the top put a glass or jar over the top and turn the water on, some tiles it is amazing how much grit comes out, turn the valve off reassemble and see if this fixed the problem it has ...


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Yes, time for new stuff. If you have a more specific question then i would be happy to try and answer it. Your question should include all relevant info on the type of stuff you have and your experience in working with stuff. Be as detailed as possible.


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I suggest before installing the taps cut the studs down to a more usable length, then just use a normal socket on them.


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Virtually any water is safe for toilet water use as long as it has, at minimum, a "sand filter" of sufficient size to keep out sand and particulates. Even fresh water from a lake, river, or stream can suffice, with its entrapped microorganisms and impurities. Ocean-going vessels utilize seawater for numerous functions, including firefighting and ...


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What can a rainwater contain? Something that was either in the air or on the roof. Acids: sulfuric or nitric, coming from the air pollution. If the air is more or less safe to breath, water raining from it is acceptable for the purpouse intended in regard to the acidic content. Steel pipes may suffer some corrosion, but they are rarely used today. Plastic ...


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The first thing to try with an old system that suddenly starts hammering is to drain the pipes (turn off water, open all faucets so that water drains from the lowest as air is admitted at higher ones) and then turn the water back on. In many cases there are already passive surge buffers in place (pipe stubs) which may have become waterlogged (lost their ...


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Yes, using rainwater can be a great way to preserve water from potable and drinkable sources. However, I do agree that some contents could cause for problems if they are present both for restrictions, erosion, and etc.


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You can't go wrong replacing 80 year old pipe and valves especially since your neighbor has had a serious leaking problem. You shouldn't really need to heat the joints to take the pipes apart, just two 12 or 18" pipe wrenches. If your referring to the copper to galvanized fitting in the picture, just cut the copper pipe above the copper fitting and ...


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Rainwater is regularly captured and used by rural domestic properties here in New Zealand for everything in a typical household - from drinking to flushing toilets, with minimal treatment. Its pretty much the norm for people in rural locations (if you are a few miles outside a built up area, you wont have mains water or sewerage) - capture rainfall runoff ...


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I had the same problem with a single value faucets. I tried a number of things - cleaning is the aerator, flushing the lines. Nothing worked. So I ended up running the hot line so much it got hot and became unclogged. The cold was still clogged, so I switched the cold line to the hot source. The hot water unclogged the blockage inside the faucet.


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It is doubtful the pH+ of rainwater anywhere, other than directly downwind of an erupting volcano, would be unsafe in terms of damaging plumbing fixtures or pipes. That said, there is concern in how the rainwater is stored. It must be kept so as not to be a breeding place for mosquitoes, toxic algae or other noxious critters, nor should the container cause ...


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Yes, you can do this, but you must make sure that the supplies to the wc are separated from the rest of the supplies to the taps, showers etc. We planned this in the plumbing for our house so that we could easily separate the washing machine and 3 wc from the other items - plumber was not happy but we got what we wanted. That meant we only needed a simple ...


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Cpvc and pvc have the same od(outside diameter) and the fittings are interchangeable. The valve is probably just labeled wrong I bet a piece of 3/4 fits the valve just fine


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I Build homes in Arizona and use 100% PEX in construction. To be honest with you I have never noticed any odor at all from the pipe so my guess is the odor must dissipate. I lived in a house that was PEX as well and did not notice a smell. I imagine it could be different if you are already living in an enclosed home when the PEX is installed, but there are ...


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I converted a passive system with a tank above the collector panel to an active system using my immersion heater as the tank, which was situated in the loft below the panel, after the tank started to leak. This worked fine except for the tubing. Some of it was CPVC (1/2")and some was black flexible "rubber" tubing. The CPVC did not stand up ...


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When plastic piping systems were first introduce to the market, the manufacturers tried to make them similar to metalic piping systems so "pipers" would accept them. So they adopted similar wall thicknesses to schedule 40 and sch. 80. Piping systems have to be checked against the pressure and temperature of the process fluid. Here in was the ...


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I would say this would be much better than the current surface mount of the pex. It will look better and less chance of damaging the lines.


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Maybe teflon tape isn't the right product for your application. Try pipe joint compound aka "pipe dope." It is a paste applied to the threads with a brush. I find that it does the job (seals the connection) in situations where teflon tape wouldn't. You might also be over-estimating what "tight enough" feels like. It doesn't have to be ...


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What I do is first screw the fitting on with no tape and see where it ends up. If it's 90 degrees past where I want it I unscrew it and add a wrap of tape or maybe a wrap and a half for each 90 degrees. It varies depending on the fitting but the key is to start with no tape and adjust from there. Like some things with plumbing it's as much art as science.


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I was taught to never exceed 3 wraps of Teflon tape, because all it is there for is to lubricate the threads and fill in the microscopic gaps between the tapered threads. Too much tape and you interfere with the threads meshing to hold pressure, so you end u relying on the tape to do that, and it was not designed for that purpose. If you read the ...


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That valve is for a different type of piping system called CPVC and the sizes and fittings are different. The difference is deliberate because CPVC is rated for hot water whereas regular PVC is not; they don't want people to accidentally (or deliberately, to save money) install regular PVC pipe or fittings on a hot water system. Look at the valve label.


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You rinse it in the bowl once the bowl is clean. Flush once or twice as necessary to rinse all the cleaner out. We usually put the handle flat across the rim of the bowl (with the brush over the bowl) then put the seat down to hold it there while we let it drip dry for an hour or two (or until someone needs to go). Don't put the lid down - it'll smash the ...


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You would of course NOT rinse it in the sink. You can put it back in the holder loosely so it will dry. Some holders have a trap door. On those prop the brush so the door stays open.


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I would install a Ice maker outlet box in the wall. This makes a nice clean looking install that is flush with the wall and does not interfere with getting the fridge in place. It is like a washing machine valve box but with just one 1/4 turn valve that will except the stainless steel braided line. The braided line screws onto the valve and then onto the ...


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I plumbed my entire 3 flat myself and put a return line to the bottom of each tank. Sweated copper. Completely well worth it. Anyone that tells you differently is foolish. With pex tubing & connections, the job is significantly easier and cheap.


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You have what is called an adjustable P-trap. The horizontal leg that runs into the slip-joint fitting at the wall pipe can be moved in and out of the wall pipe. You simply loosen the slip-joint nut in your picture and slide the trap arm further in to make the whole trap assembly move closer to the wall: It looks to me like you have at least another inch of ...


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I assume your asking about how to tie your sink drain to the wall stub. Standard 1 1/2" PVC drain pipe has slp compression fittings that give you a lot of flexibility in setting up your P trap and drain. In most cases you can make adjustments without shortening the wall stub. However, in some cases you may have to shorten the wall stub. If you ...


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OK, you're going to need a drain pipe extension attached to your new drain pipe. Remove the blue protective tape. It might just be easier to replace your pipe with a longer PVC pipe rather than having to cut your pipe to fit the extension in.


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Use your favorite internet search engine (or just walk into your favorite local plumbing supply house or home improvement center) and look for: sink tail pipe extension Purchase, assemble, cut off 90% of what you just bought, connect the trap to the remains of the extension. The shortest one you'll probably find is 6". Since you only need about 6mm, you ...


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See diagram. Instead of slip (or sleeve) connectors you can have stronger glued joints. It will be less fiddly also. Excavate around the tee, and much more along the upper pipe. cut the higher pipe past the injury, and the pipe going into the tee at a matching place. Also cut as expected on the other side of the tee. Think carefully about the order of joint ...


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Two possibilities come to mind. First of all, is this a pressurized main line? or a distribution line that only has pressure when the zone is being operated? It looks like a glue failure from the impact. One trick my plumber buddies use is to put a shop vac on some part of the plumbing and suck in some heavy glue (like Christies Red hot Blue Glue) by ...


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You'll have to cut the tee pipe on both sides of the tee. Cut the pipe two inches from the edge of the tee in both directions. Also cut to the left of the red circle. Bring your cutout piece to your home store and get new parts and construct a new piece to fit exactly in place. Get three slip connectors to connect the three pipes to the existing ones.


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So although I agree with Jason's answer that there is no technical way to fix this the "Correct" way without tearing it out and starting again, I decided to try my own permanent solution to attempt to avoid a costly repair. What I ended up doing is going out and getting two packs of Loctite's marine epoxy. This is supposed to bond to PVC, concrete ...


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So far as I know, residential ranges and ovens do not require venting to the outside, only commercial locations (restaurants etc.). You might WANT to do so to get smells / cooking smoke out of the house, but it is not required. In that case, you can likely fit your over-the-stove microwave oven with a pass-through vent that would go through ducting and out ...


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Hoo Boy! You've got some work ahead of you. You "could" add a 2,500 gallon storage tank, but why? How much does the well produce? How deep is it? What is the static water level and how much does it drop when pumping? If you did add a storage tank, the pump could be controlled by float valves or electrodes in the storage tank. You really have two ...


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Pressure loss in a pipe is proportional to the flow through the pipe. A garden hose has potential for high flow, meaning higher pressure loss in the pipe, and you mention that the system pressure is already "not that great." I can think of two reasons not to use a larger-than-necessary pipe: when it simply costs too much to use the oversize pipe (...


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If you don't want to solder any fittings then use compression or push-on (Shark-Bite or similar). Don't fret over issues like "if I go with plan A there are 6 pipe-to-fitting connections that could fail, but if I go with plan B then there are 7 of them but it accommodates future changes.." Plumbing has joints. Don't use two dozen fittings where 8 ...


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I think you should take off for the outside faucet from the 3/4" PEX. This will have a lesser effect on the water pressure inside the house than taking off on the 1/2" line that goes to the kitchen. You can always throttle back at the outside faucet if you need to. EDIT You could run a 1/2" line to the outside faucet, split off from the 3/4&...


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1/2" is fine for individual fixtures such as sinks and dishwashers, but high flow fancy showers should be 3/4" Also, your trunk line should have been 3/4". It also depends upon the water pressure supplied by your utility or well. If it's high enough, you can "get by" with 1/2" but bigger is usually better. The only ...


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You might need to use a Fernco coupling to get everything hooked back up. It's a rubber coupling with hose clamps to hold the rubber in place like this: Source: SupplyHouse.com No endorsement of the vendor intended or implied - they just had a nice pic. I'd use it on the 1 1/2" pipe up to the 2nd floor. Slide it on the 1 1/2" pipe, up and out of ...


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I'd use a 2" to the basement, 1.5" to sink and 1.5" to upstairs. Glue the section of the tee to the basement first, then get your straight 1.5" piece and glue it to the top of the tee. Get a pvc slip connector for the 1.5" to 1.5" pipes. Get all your pieces and play around with them to see the best way to position them to the ...


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FIXED! The problem was these little buggers inside the shark bites. Don’t know why the handy man use shark bite instead of soldering, but those little plastic bits were restricting the flow enough to shoot everything right up to the shower. Removed them, replaced everything, now the tub works as it should. Holy smokes!


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Since the water shut off your valve must have the "valve closing" threads near the valve sealing point deep inside the valve, not out near the packing nut you've removed. The stem broke off from the "head" of the valve with the threads and seal. In theory if you could get the water shut off upstream (might mean the main shutoff, evidently,...


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I'd insulate the pipes and move on PPR, like PEX and unlike PVC, is a freeze-tolerant material; however, that doesn't mean that pipes made from it should be allowed to freeze on a routine basis. I would start by adding pipe insulation (foam pipe insulation is available as prefab, "peel and stick" pieces) provided these are not irrigation pipes, ...


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Prefacing this by saying I don't live in Canada, and am not familiar with the codes there. I had the exact same situation as you do. Not with just 2 pipes, but with cold water feeds for half the house, all copper (prone to pinhole leaks where I live). I had my very good plumber and an inspector look at it, and they told me that at the time the house was ...


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