New answers tagged

0

Before doing any of this you would need to make sure the water is off, either by turning off the water to the entire house, or by turning off the water to that faucet. The easiest way to fix the broken valve would be to get a new stop valve, but that looks like it was plumbed using expansion pex of some sort, which require specialized tools to use, and even ...


1

I cannot offer a definite hard and fast rule regarding your situation, but if it helps, I can give advice based on my own experience. I live in South Africa, in Cape Town, on the coast, and recently bought a house of just over 100 years of age. In south Africa, even back then, we were using copper pipes, I've been doing alot of renovating over the last few ...


0

What she probably meant was that, over time, a small leak might seal itself due to build-up of "salts" at the leak site. Minerals will precipitate out of the water as it evaporates and build up, salt might be a term used casually to describe the various minerals. I would not rely on this idea, the pipe needs proper repair.


0

As mentioned in an other answer, (galvanized) steel pipes can be very robust - f.e. here in Europe the lines of the 60ies/70ies are made for a lifetime of minimum 100 years. In those days, that was not a pure marketing parlance. In domestic water lines, the galvanic series must be respected. In flow direction, the nobility must never decrease. F.e. copper ...


0

Have you considered the possibility that the main water shutoff valve is the culprit here? It may appear to work fine, but perhaps it's allowing air to enter the pipes? Maybe the valve itself is faulty, or the installation of the valve is faulty. From what you've written, the only difference is the new main water shutoff valve. It seems like it's ...


1

It depends on the water , steel can last a very long time in some waters, so doing nothing unless there is a problem is an option. Find out from neighbors ( with steel pipe) if there have been problems. If any is accessible , a piece of pipe could be removed and examined as an indication of the whole system but opening an old pipe connection can easily make ...


0

It could reseal itself in the same way that rust could "seal" an iron pipe. "Copper is one of the least resistant metals to salt-related corrosion." source It is certainly not the most correct thing to do, but could it work? I suppose so. Copper radiators clogged from corrosion all the time. What's the difference between a clog and a seal, after all?


3

There are no clear cut rules on how an auger should work. They're designed to "screw" into the clog and either break it up so it flows down the drain or catch the clog so you can pull it out with the auger. Keep trying to remove bits of the litter like you said you have done. Chemical stuff probably won't work since the litter is compressed paper and has ...


0

It should work still. Just make sure not to overtighten when replacing if it is a glass lined tank.


0

There is a chance it is the glue (or cleaner) used for PVC pipes. There may have been PVC pipes previously installed and it dripped there. The part might be secondhand also, quite common with fittings. But it should be dry if glue, not paste.


1

Flip the breaker and let the tank cool down. If the water stops dripping your problem is probably the thermostat. If it just slowed down it's probably time for a pressure relief valve. Sometimes the seats in the pressure relief valves get some corrosion. Try flipping the little lever a couple times. Please be careful, moving the lever will cause a ...


1

if the water is dangerously hot it's probably the thermostat that needs attention , if it's warm or cold probably the valve itself or the pressure regulator.


0

If your temperature setting on the thermostats are at decent levels, then you either have a faulty "hi limit" switch on your top thermostat which would have to then be replaced or your pressure relief valve is faulty. If I had to guess based on experience, I'd say it was the thermostat. The bi-metal strip in the thermostat is more likely to get out of wack ...


0

I'm a housing inspector for the federal government. When I spec a rehab and it includes installing a new handicap w.c., . I spec it from the floor up , Always. Including a new stop and supply line. For the reason mentioned above. For a leak. Mist of the time I will just install a new stop. But as it has been mentioned, you can usually tighten packing nut ...


3

The green stuff is cupric chloride, a byproduct of corrosion of the valve body. It's typical of water leakage where the water is of low pH. It's usually found on copper pipes. Your pipes have been painted so it's not forming on them but you do have untreated copper going into the valve. Make sure all the connection are tight.


1

Based on you answer in the comments my answer would be. Presumably if it was a sink then its vent was provided by the nearby main stack so you should be able to put a san-tee on it and p-trap into the san-tee. BUT it could have had a vent coming of the original san-tee and connecting elsewhere to the stack ? You want the san-tee low so that you have room ...


2

Most codes require at least 15 inches (measured from the center of the toilet) from any side wall or obstruction and not closer than 30 inches center to center to any other sanitary fixture. (The NKBA actually recommends 32 inches.) There should be at least 24 inches of clear space in front of a toilet or bidet. Sourced from This Old House, emphasis mine. ...


0

This is an idea that I have never tested, but it sounds good in my head... That said... Get an IR thermometer or another fast-updating method for measuring the temperature of the pipes. Hold the IR thermometer against the unknown pipe and get a good baseline temperature when NO water has been running for hours. Now, turn on various water sources and see ...


1

I disagree that you see the main cutoff anywhere here. Keep looking - all those pipes originate from some other inlet to the house. My guess about the red-handle valve is it's there to allow water flow when the softener tank is "offline". That valve should be closed under normal operation. I see two "T" joints after the green valve. One has the blue-...


0

What did the plumbers do / say? Seems like you'd just remove the braided sink line coming from the hot shutoff under the sink and then test to see the water pressure and flow. If they replaced the shutoffs, that implies they did the above and didn't get water flow, why they'd replace the faucets at the point seems like a waste of money. If the ...


1

Well just clean it up with the pressure gone! Then follow the instructions. Do not waste $ that is a quality valve. Shut off the pressure to this valve, heat and pump. Then clean it up and seal as you should have done to start with.


1

D'oh - Problem solved. Heater drain valve was not opened sufficiently, due to unfamiliarity with the new-style plastic collar-operated drain valve. The key clue was the rise in indicated pressure, which showed that there was impedance into the tank. With the valve correctly opened, there is no rise.


1

You'll want to mount your disposal so the outlet of the disposal can mate up with the pipe that's connected to the wall. It looks like it's currently positioned pretty close if you mount the disposal on the right. If you want it on the left then you'll probably need to shorten the pipe going into the wall and swing the trap around 180 degrees. The outlet of ...


0

I had 1 house that the main line was old concrete pipe, I had to use a large power snake 1-2x each year. After replacing 60’ of pipe I did get a few years with no problems but the last year we were there I did have to run the big snake with the root cutter again. The new roots were close to the main connection to the sewer and that was 8’ below grade. So ...


1

You've got way too much drain hose down there. The drains come in high as they should but all the wrap-a-rounds hamper the draining and the waste just siphons back into the washer. Once the drains start heading down after their high entry, they should connect to the main drain. Rotate those taps for a more direct connection. You would be able to get a ...


1

I think it is time to call a plumber for help. Your snake may not be big enough or long enough. The plumber I use has a snake with a camera so you can see what is in the piping. By using the camera he can spot any problems that may be lurking underground and fix the problem you are having.


1

Technically speaking, the pressure is not related to pipe size. The flow is most certainly related to pipe size. Going from 1/2 to 3/4 inch pipe is a huge flow increase. But most showers with one or even two heads won't tax the supply from one properly functioning 1/2 inch pipe. If you have three or more shower heads running, the flow may reduce some. I'm ...


1

The regulator keeps the incoming pressure to 60. The issue you are seeing is probably caused after using hot water , the cold water in the hw tank is at 60 and now being heated so the pressure rises. To prove this to yourself if the pressure is at 70 open a cold water tap for a few seconds, now the pressure is at 60, if the water in the hot water tank is ...


1

It sounds like a chunk of the washer in that valve may have plugged the line. I have seen similar issues with faucets where they won’t turn off all the way, this is usually caused from the rubber seal starting to fail. When you open the valve back up a chunk gets lodged and stops the water flow. The problem may be in the valve or it could have passed ...


3

You should be able to turn the clamp nut by the wall... ...which will allow the horizontal portion of the drain connection to pull out of the wall. It may have enough slide connection so it can be reclamped to use the existing pipe to reach the new down spout on the sink. If it is not long enough then you will need to purchase new parts to achieve a ...


8

Try tightening the brass nut right above the handle. That should top the leak. Use an adjustable wrench, not pliers or channel locks. If you remove the valve, you'll have to install a repair sleeve on the pipe and sweat solder it for the best results.


3

If it looks like dryer vent (location location location & size) & it smells like dryer vent (gets hot and wet when using the dryer) & quacks like dryer vent (you hear it, and its hot and wet, and it vibrates) ..... It is a dryer vent. There are many posts on this forum and threads online where contractors have improperly used PVC for dryer vent....


3

Mixing valves could be the problem and depending on the year built or later faucet replacements the kitchen faucet and bathroom faucets are also possible causes. By turning the shutoff valves the guilty valv should be able to be identified.


1

behind the circle it the shaft flares out to a square,hex, or spline, there's a special wrench available for it. (it looks square in the photo, but I'm not certain)


2

That looks like a standard multi turn valve it should look square further inside or have splines, if nether of these are true you have an issue that I found on one house I had to flip, i thought someone had cut off the valve stem , why I don’t know , but since the end of the shaft is clean , no hack saw or dremel cut off disks or other grinder marks it ...


1

I had a Jado 1/2 inch cold cartridge. I had to disconnect the braided water lines and backed the entire valve down below the granite counter. I used vice grips where the water splits in the valve (no threads there to ruin). Then I used a large crescent wrench on the packing nut of the cartridge. It freed the nut. Then I was able to track the part number down ...


0

It could very well be the cartridge. They can get clogged just as easy as the aerators on your faucets. Also check the valves on your water heater. If they are partially closed it will cut down on the flow out.


4

If allowed in your location an air admittance valve can be added. It needs to be close to the level of the drain. I put them in the sink cabinet as close to the top as I can. I agree with @kris my 1930 farm house has the vent outside several Victorians I remodeled also had them outside. But an AAV if allowed is the easiest but not in the crawl space.


0

As others have said, yes you will get a slightly improved flow with the larger pipe. If you are looking for a good but inexpensive shower head buy a Delta model 52650-PK for about $15.00 from Home Depot, Lowes, Or almost any Plumbing supply store. I tried 1 and liked it so much I bought 3 more. I have 3 showers and have an extra for a spare. My 2 cents


3

If you are looking to increase the water flow to the fixtures in your house but do not want to re-pipe the whole house, you could increase the supply pipe from the 3/4" inlet to the water heater. Tee off any of the individual supplies from the new 3/4" supply with reducers and the final pipe into the hot water tank could stay 1/2". This way you would double ...


1

Alex here (some reason I'm locked out of the original account). It happen to be the 1 of my shower's valves. I noticed that the hot and cold water inlets were connected to the valve's sides labeled "shower" and "tub". I had to detach and weld the valve back to where the "shower" points up and "tub" points down. I also replaced the plastic cartridge where the ...


1

Do you have a pressure reducing shower head? Increasing the size of the pipe will reduce friction losses and result in slightly more pressure - my impression is the effect wouldn't be large. How much more pressure are you hoping to get? Do you know the water pressure for your house? Are your pipes currently copper or pex? Switching to pex and ...


2

Update: We are still not sure what caused the issue, but we had the plumbing company come out and do a vinegar wash of the entire system. This worked and the smell is gone.


0

It's the PEX tubing!! I just had some added when I had a whole house filtration system put in. Pex leaches over 150 chemicals. Now I'm back to ground zero and I have to get it taken out and replaced with copper. It does smell worse with hot water running. Mine smells like pure plastic. The plumber adding the PEX tubing to my line and it defeated my ...


2

While the picture sure makes it look bad, chances are the sink is ok. You won't know for sure until you get the faucet off, but once you do, just make sure the metal is still solid. It should be. If the rust doesn't clean up, and the basin has seen better days it might give you some joy to put a new sink basin in. Anywhoo.... Loosen the single inner small ...


1

I would turn the water heater to pilot if you turn the water off, pilot will keep a small amount of heat there and unless it gets crazy cold would help prevent freezing. I grew up in that area and rarely will it get cold enough to freeze pipes inside the house even if you turn the heat way down, I never recommend turning the furnace totally off as that can ...


2

It looks like a drain on the wall and a toilet drain and possibly a shower but I can’t make out if it has a trap and the placement is a bit strange (if it is for a shower you just need a cap with a threaded hole in either case This would be a good diy project. You could add the trap for less than 20$ you might have to cut the cap off I see primer on that ...


2

Please note that this is for your own safety. It keeps you from drinking water that's been contaminated by nasty things such as animal feces, dead critters, fertilizers, or even pesticides. It keeps you from being sued by your neighbors if they get sick. As it is a law in Texas, even rural areas, we have to abide by it. $100.00 for a PVB with fittings is ...


3

Which valve is this? Hopefully it's not the main valve to your home. Can I safely assume you wish to avoid a propane torch and solder? Assuming that you can turn off the main water supply and assuming you never plan to actually use this valve then I would highly recommend cutting out that section of pipe and replacing it with two SharkBite push-to-connect ...


7

It is absoloutely possible to DIY plumbing in most cases, but it pays to take some time to fully understand the situation before you start. The first thing I would do is evaluate the broader situation. What does that valve feed? where is it fed from? Is there another shutoff valve upstream? Does the upstream shutoff valve work? Does the upstream shutoff ...


Top 50 recent answers are included