New answers tagged

0

There's a good chance the clog is in the trap right under the sink. Someone should try to remove it and clean it out. If it's not the trap, get a cheap drain snake and run it down the drain with the trap off. I'm not sure any of the drain cleaners would work on spackle. Good luck.


1

A thermostatic mixing valve is the same device as a thermostatic shower, the mechanism is the same but the body & fittings different. So, have you tried adjusting the existing valve? Is there any chance it has got some debris in it causing it to fluctuate. Is the cold supply to the mixing valve restricted? It may be a faulty valve which needs ...


2

TPR piping has one solitary purpose, and that is to relieve pressure should a problem arise that overpressures or boils water in the heater. Such a problem could include the city supply overpressuring for some reason. The discharge will be steam or water, and it needs to discharge somewhere (preferably: safe). The discharge could be massive since it is ...


1

If you're serious about correcting the problem you could get a 10 gallon tank, bucket, capable of handling 210 degrees F. and a hot water circulating pump with a float activation switch. the TPR valve discharges water into the bucket, the float switch activates the pump, the pump pumps the water out the piping that it already there going outside. These pumps ...


1

I don't know what a "red cap" is on a toilet, but if it's hissing then water is passing somewhere and the most likely is that the float-valve is letting through. It might stop if you bounce it a couple of times, if some grit has got in the mechanism, but otherwise it's a new valve or washer/diaphragm depending on the type of valve.


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Typically there is very little clearance behind the dishwasher and the back of the cabinet. A hose attached directly to the inlet might have to be bent and kinked in order to fit. That would not be good. The elbow allows the supply line to run parallel to the back of the dishwasher without taking up much room. As for the ¾" versus ⅜" connectors, again ...


3

This happened to me a few times when I'd be gone and the house would be vacant for a week. The water just evaporated. The tanks were full but the bowls in both bathrooms were dry. I solved the problem by covering the bowls with Glad Wrap. Worked like a charm. Just make sure to remember to remove it when you get back... Good luck.


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You are going to have a disposer in a single basin sink? I would never disturb all that original copper drain pipe for such a project. Rethink this. Disposers are not even allowed in new construction in some jurisdictions. They waste water and unnecessarily add food waste to the sewage stream. Food waste should go in the garbage.


2

Cutting is the only way to get it off, I doubt that it was original most homes that age were galvanized & cast iron. The supply looks to be galvanized is the reason I would think it’s not original. They didn’t leave any good place to cut it from what I see. You will probably need to remove the expanding foam hopefully there will be a hub or something you ...


1

12 inches above the floor is really cutting it close. Most cabinets have a kick toe of 6 inches so you'd only have 6 inches to install and work the trap. I'd be looking at 16 to 18 inches above the floor. Good luck.


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I would be cautious that old galvanized pipe may crumble opening a big can of worms. The pipe will be rusty and difficult to remove but if you can unscrew it a shorter nipple and possibly some 45’s would allow enough space for the disposal. As far as a replacement material ABS (plastic) would be my choice much easier and cheaper to work with. I would advise ...


1

Grundfos makes a pump that has a timer built in. Set it to come on about 1 hour before the water is likely to be used. Definitely make sure there is a check valve between the cold water valve and where the pump ties in to it so hot water doesn’t bleed in to your cold water. Last thing to check is if the recirculation line goes to the kitchen and then back to ...


4

In France it's commonplace. Not only having small shut-off valves for hot and cold, but also to toilet, washer, dishwasher shower and water heater feeds. There's also manifolds near the rising main and off electric boilers, which isolate each separate feed. Possibly over the top, and meaning more potential leaks, but nevertheless useful on occasions. It'...


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Most water PEX pipe has a UV stable outer coating. Check the brand and spec sheets. If it is UV stable, its fine unless the sheath is cut or damaged. NOTE: gas PEX does not have this coating.


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Water cools at different rates in different parts of the system Basically, the pipes from the heater to the faucet are not in the same thermal conditions. For example, pipes in internal walls are at indoor air temperature (say 20C) and pipes in roofspaces will be at (close to) outside air temperature (say 5C to 40C depending on where you live). If the ...


4

There are - just not usually in houses Commercial, industrial and multi-residential buildings almost always have isolation valves for floor or unit take-offs and for each "group" of fixtures. What constitutes a "group" depends on the layout of the building. Basically its a design balancing act between the how large an area has to be shut down for repairs or ...


3

Yes it is your main shut off valve. I'm assuming this is in a basement, from the looks. You're good on that. The best experiment to prove this out is to turn the handle clockwise until it stops. This usually takes about 10 turns. The wire attached is a grounding conductor which more than likely goes inside your breaker box .


18

Yes, that looks like your main shutoff valve. It's normally the first valve on your water supply from where it enters your house, and typically before the water meter. In my house there is another valve on the other side of the meter that makes it possible to swap out the meter without draining the house. The copper wire is part of our house's grounding....


2

This really depends on the style of home and the floorplan. For example: My previous home was a 3 story town house with a kitchen, utility room, and half bath on the 1st floor and full baths on the 2nd and 3rd floors. As with most modern designs, all of the rooms with water service were stacked over another to minimize the amount of plumbing that needs to ...


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Tradition is not to do it ; It is difficult to get contractors or plumbers to change. When I drew up my house plans I put a valve at each water use point ( You don't need each room). Although I was there most of the construction I missed that the plumbers did not put in shut off valves for either tub/ shower . I need them now , it is very inconvenient to ...


1

Here in the UK you commonly find a stopcock in the kitchen for the cold supply to everything except the sink, in the cupboard under the sink (Sometimes the hot as well, but most appliances are cold fill only these days). I imagine this is because if an appliance like a washing machine or dishwasher is leaking slightly, it's not immediately obvious which ...


32

This is a result of building as efficiently (cheaply) as possible, and there is almost no need for room valves. First, efficiency: Valves are more expensive than pipe. Extra valves means more labor cost. If the valves are to be centrally located, then more pipe is required because each "zone" will have to be home-run instead of branching off a shared pipe. ...


3

As far as I know there aren't any return valves in these shower systems. You will have a column of standing water remaining in the pipe. (When the shower isn't used for a couple of weeks you should always run the water a few minutes before using the shower to get that stale water flushed out. It is an ideal place for bacteria to develop. In hot weather ...


22

The Viega Manabloc is an example of a system in which a central valve manifold uses a dedicated tube for every fixture in the house, as alluded in the comment from BillDOe. In some US homes it's not a difficult retrofit to split the house into at least two zones. Typically the water service enters an unfinished "utility closet" space where the water heater ...


14

It would be difficult to install area shutoffs in most residences, since they need to be accessible to be useful. The best case scenario is an access panel in the floor or wall, the worst case is outside the room in an adjoining room or closet. Even more damning is the fact that they would, by definition, be in non-standard locations. I pity the poor ...


2

Two issues come to mind here. First, I think the way your toilet is flushing is not related to the way your waste lines are plumbed. Unless you have another toilet of the same make and model that flushes differently, I think that's just how yours works. Even if your venting was nonexistent, your 4" waste line should have plenty of air space to let it work ...


1

The ones I looked at could definitely be installed in a bedroom. Keep in mind that they would need a water hookup, a drain and about a 20AMP/240V GFCI electric service.


1

For it to be a bath it requires 2 fixtures (a basin with one or more other fixtures per 2017 NEC) With just the shower I see no problem but you would need to change any receptacles within 6’ to a GFCI.


15

User Matthew is correct that a nipple extractor may help you salvage the tee. You need to check the threads in the Tee for any damage, since if the threads are scratched you may get a leak. If the tee is badly damaged If the tee can’t be reused, you will need to replace it. This part is readily available at any home-improvement store (but see below). ...


11

There is a tool called a nipple extractor. It can be used to remove broken threaded parts just like this. You can find one online or from any irrigation supply or DIY retailer likely for under $15. You firmly press it into the broken part and turn to remove it.


0

I would leave it alone. It's not restricting flow so no need to mess with it. you might, and probably will, make the problem worse.


2

If you can drain the pipe, then you could heat the pipe with a blow torch and using some long handle pliers or pipe grips gently "persuade" the kink out... You have to have patience. But if it is not severe then leave well alone and don't bend it any more.


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The flow limiters in most faucets is based on 60psi. I have adjusted these in the cases they cannot be removed with a simple drill bit several sizes larger than the existing hole, in my last home the entire place had 3/4” copper even after the shower valves that were 1/2”. Seeing the massive supply’s and plumbing I set my master suite with a 6’ jacuzzi tub ...


0

What adaptor should I be looking for to go from typical (USA) male faucet threads to 1/2 hose barb? First you will need to ascertain what threads your faucet spout has (there are many); a faucet thread gauge will help (these can be found in plumbing shops and sometimes in the plumbing dept. of "big box" stores): Then you will need to adapt to a thread for ...


0

The easiest solution is just a garden hose repair end. Available at most hardware stores. These usually come with a brass barbed connector and a hose clamp. A second type has a plastic barbed end and two plastic halves that are bolted together around the outside of the hose. Usually available in 1/2" and 5/8" 1/2" black poly line is usually closer to ...


0

Just Googling around a bit, it looks like there's some options. Disclaimer: These are just search results, not brand or store recommendations. I used the search terms: faucet to 1/2" hose barb adapter. Brass Quick Garden Water Tap Connector 1/2 Inch to 3/4 Inch Universal Pipe Fitting Adapter Easy Connect Home Yard/Washing Machine Thread Water Faucet ...


0

Also, check on your roof to make sure that your vent pipe is not blocked. A bird nest or dead rat is a common issue. The bird nest is easy to see, the dead rat, no so much...


2

Depending on access to the pipe in that area, there is a pipe freezing kit available which freezes a small section of pipe. This blocks the flow of water and allows the valve or whatever to be changed. Some places hire these, and some plumbers have them as part of their kit. Plumbers will normally use the most effective solution for the situation...


1

I'd like the well pump's power to be automatically killed during a power outage and only turn it on manually when I can get to the house to inspect, I'd use a thermostat inside the home, set to a few degrees above freezing. When temperature is too low, it shuts down power to the pump. You need a thermostat for air conditioning, not for heating, as contacts ...


1

Where there are trusses, it's relatively easy to add short horizontal supports between any two uprights. Then you can add planks to walk on between the horizontals. Use a string line to ensure that a run of horizontal supports line up and the plank sits securely. You can determine the thickness of plank required by testing outdoors. Standard floor boards ...


4

If your HVAC situation permits it... The ability to have a source of heat that works during a power outage is a massive asset, especially if power outages are a serious concern (as they typically are on the long overhead feeds found in rural areas). Either a wall furnace (Empire-style) or a gas fireplace can be used; either way, you'll want a sealed ...


2

Lacking any details (feel free to edit your question and add them) about your well pump type (suction, jet, submersible) or location, this mostly sounds like an improperly pre-pressurized accumulator (pressure tank.) If the pump kicks on at 30 PSI and the air side of the tank is not set at 27 or 28 PSI, the water in the tank may run out before the pump gets ...


0

Do you have the old handles? If so, take them to a plumbing supply store. They should be able to fit you up with some that will work. If you don't have them, then take the valves and diverter out and bring them to the plumbing store. Might be a good idea to do that anyway and have the washers replaced. Are the covers and sleeves still in good shape? If not, ...


0

I have a universal faucet wrench but it may be too thick because of the shroud, my next set of tools is actually a set of sockets that looks like a chain saw wrench maybe 6 sizes they are hollow and each one is 2 sizes. These may be long enough to be able to get a wrench on , I will try to find a proper description and edit the answer. I found part number ...


2

https://www.amazon.com/Moen-118305-Installation-Tool/dp/B002PB1JJS You need an extremely deep socket. Most faucet manufacturers make them, and they're often included with a new faucet. That metal collar makes it look like a standard basin wrench won't work, but it's worth a shot if you have one.


11

I live in Florida too so I know exactly what you mean about hot attics. I had the same problem except for the pvc water pipes. I put up a number of 2 by 8 feet of 3/4 inch plywood on the rafters. Where it was possible to move over some of the cables, I did it. where I couldn't move them, I took some 2x4's, notched them for the wires to go thru and put them ...


1

Simpler than that... Use a rundown timer on the water pump 12 hours after you set it, it automatically shuts off, whether you are present or not. It's a nuisance while you're there, but can't be forgotten. Use a furnace that doesn't use electricity That would be an "Empire style" floor or wall furnace. Ours does fine service during outages.


1

This can be handled with a simple motor start station rated adequately to handle the load of the well pump. Additionally, you will need a momentary manual start switch. Feed the control circuit through momentary start switch off the line side of the contactor. Feed a holding circuit off the load side of the contactor. Then with a standard manual ...


0

Perhaps you should ask the plumber if they have a reason for doing this the way they did. Perhaps you have a floor joist in the way and the plumbing will be under the toekick of the cabinet. It would have been much more work for the plumber to do things this way than to come straight up the wall so im sure there is more here than meets the eye.


1

The short pipe looks like it's a condensate drain - which will trickle when the AC is operating. It needs to run to a drain or to the outside. It looks like the insulation over the pipes has been damaged by the condensate running over it, and will need to be replaced. Even if the drain wasn't running onto them, the pipes are cold, so will sweat unless they'...


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