New answers tagged

1

Short of it: Yes he can hold final inspection because of revealed information. Possibly your GC could fight for it but we decided to just tie in the washer to septic as it wasn't that much work (some digging and some pipe). I'd like to think if I had said "this isn't part of the project" he would have left it but I suspect he may have been able to ...


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I built my own manifold using tees, nipples and ball valves. My supply to my manifold is 1” and all my valves are 3/4” I have several of these at my farm, my setup is fed from the top valve and the bottom valve can fill a 5-7 gallon bucket, if the weather is going to be really cold I will close off the top valve and open the bottom valve and drain the ...


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I wanted to follow up on this in case anyone stumbles upon it. I actually ended up using a relatively new solution -- a 2810HR Joist Reinforcer. It's a 14-gauge steel plate which allowed for a larger bore (in my case I made it 4.5") through a 2x10 and I put one on each side of the headers. The IBC/IRC certification they have for the plates passed ...


2

I recently dealt with a similar problem -- I installed a water accessory and was faced with a 3/8" compression male outlet and nothing needing to be connected to it. A cap was easy to find at the plumbing supply but it didn't seal well. Wrapping the male thread with teflon tape plus pipe dope slowed the leak to a very slow drip, but the fact is the ...


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. . . will the 1/2" width of the manifold's ports perceptibly limit the water-pressure in the attached hoses? The size of the opening has no effect on the water pressure, but it WILL affect the flow rate. That is, a 3/4-inch-diameter opening will allow more water to flow than will a 1/2-inch-diameter opening. You can experiment by attaching a 1/2-inch-...


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The hoses pictured in your previous (linked) post have a 1/2" NPT female thread (so stop worrying/commenting about the size of the line itself). Any fitting that will result in you having a 1/2" NPT male thread, will work. Nobody can advise on the appropriate "push-in" connector because we don't know what you are trying to attach it to (...


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23-9/16" means 23 tpi and 9/16" in diameter - tpi is threads per inch. Standard sizes so any decent hardware / plumbing store can help.


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Found it. The pressure limiter(?) where the water line came into the house was an internal 1/2" diameter. So 1" line into the house, and from that to, then split tp 3/4 lines. And 1/2 to the fixtures. But with a 1' length of 1/2" at the very start because a plumber was lazy during construction and when they didn't have the right diameter unit, ...


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We have a large 3600 sq ft vacation rental that typically houses 10-14 people. We have a 50 gallon gas tank water heater but guests have complained that the hot water runs out after a while. Only the maximum number of people is relevant so if you say it's good for 14 people in your ad, that's the number you worry about. You need about 10 gallons tank per ...


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I could find no fittings to do what I needed to. I ended up cutting the entire assembly off at the main and rebuilding it from scratch to gain the inch I needed.


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If you run the pipe up hill the pipe will accumulate water in the upwards part and it will leak out around the stem of the valve. The added ppressure caused by the standing water will not be enough to cause failure of the tank, but if the stem corrodes the valve may become inoperable. (which could be disasterous) The most likely result will just be an ...


1

If you do want to move that pipe, you can chip and patch concrete to do so if you wish. I've chipped out over a hundred plastic and metal pipes, frequently for the same purpose. You have to use good technique to avoid puncturing the pipe and having to chip it back further, but it's more about patience and methodology than anything. Depending on what ...


1

I recommend that you first get to work with a spade or shovel and remove a lot of the soil in that area so you have room to work and better access to more of the piping that is shown. THEN, shut off the water at the street meter and find a suitable place to cut out the old pipe and valve and replace with new material. Then put a valve box around the repair ...


2

A pressure relief valve does (or should) what it says: relieve pressure. That is exactly what you want - in the unlikely but non-zero event that a water heater overheats or has some other problem causing the water inside to get very hot (which leads to high pressure) or to get to much higher than normal pressure, the valve opens to relieve the pressure. ...


3

Let's assume you can't make major changes to the bathroom layout because the drains are already installed in the concrete floor. Right? So ... taking the suggestions to "notch it out" just a little further: Where you have your chalk sink, install a wall-mounted sink without a cabinet beneath it. Frame out the bathroom with a large cubic ...


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Perhaps the O-ring provides a seal in some other kind of drain system in another country. I've never seen one like it on a drain tube. If the white compression nut shown has a wedge shaped compression washer under it, that's all you need and the O ring isn't part of the seal. In any event it can't do anything because your drain tube is too short! It ...


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Ring labeled "A": Multi-function tapered rubber gasket that centers the drain assembly in the bottom sink hole, cushions the clamping action of the nut that secures the drain assembly, and seals the lower hole (most sinks have an overflow drain-hole and channel cast into the body of the sink that leads to the space between the upper main drain-...


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It's an o-ring. It's there to act as a seal to stop water leaking from the junction of the metal drain body to the plastic drain pipe. Not fitting it may cause leaks. You can turn your faucets on full and see if you get a leak.


4

Either make the bathroom 2" smaller or 2" bigger. If you are committed to moving the line then use a hammer drill to put a hole where you want and reroute the water main from the outside in (this will require you to dig outside, cut the line, and install a new line). If you go this route then I recommend installing PEX as that will be easier to ...


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If you don't have a hack saw and don't want to spend any cash, you might be able to crush the down pipe with the channel locks, then wiggle it back and forth until it breaks.


2

Take $15 and get an angle grinder from harbor freight. https://www.harborfreight.com/corded-4-12-in-43-amp-angle-grinder-69645.html Before I had any tools I use to mess around with hand tools like hacksaws - what a joke and a waste of time.


4

Buy or make a close quarters hacksaw. If it has a pistol style handle, turn it around so it's opposite the teeth. Carefully cut a slit in the flange, then grab the flange with pliers just as in your second picture, crumple it in on itself and push it down through the hole. While you're working on this cover the drain tube with a sandwich bag using a ...


1

Pull the drain flange up like in your second picture. Insert a large screwdriver through both holes in the pipe for leverage and use your Channellocks or a pipe wrench to turn that flange counterclockwise while holding the screwdriver firm. If that doesn't work, cut the pipe from the bottom with a hacksaw


4

"Professionals" can be idiots too. That serves no purpose and, accordingly, has no code requirement. You can cut it out, move it and all you need to do is ensure you have a check valve near the exit from the sump pump and a long 90 (avoid a hard 90 with a drop like this) to the entrance to the lateral. You should install a clean-out near the exit ...


5

It looks like you have the following The trap arm coming out of the wall is wrong. There should be a compression ring on it. Instead, it has threads. The adapter is to fix the need for two compression rings (this makes your trap contact the floor needlessly) The trap is 1 1/2" The pipe coming up to your drain is 1 1/2" Your sink drain pipe is 1 1/...


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EPILOGUE The vertical copper pipe at the top of the drywall is the slab pipe. This answer documents the details and thought process that confirmed the hypothesis. BACKGROUND I hope this answer helps a future reader. Because of time constraints and I believe I had a 90+% chance I had the right pipe. The goal was to minimize any water released when cutting ...


7

This is so blatantly wrong that I have to think the contractor just forgot to finish it up. It almost looks like a stainless steel drain pipe going into that piece of PVC. Your fix would be fairly easy if you don't want to mess with the contractors. Just get a rubber coupling similar to the one pictures below and remove the PVC pipe from the trap and slide ...


10

Yes this seems faulty, not just a poor alternative. Installer needs to come back and fix it, at their cost, with proper seal rings ...etc. This is very straightforward and easy work that should and easily could have been done right. In the interim, try to slide a bucket, a container or a lid (inside facing up) under the P trap to collect water and prevent ...


2

This is not appropriate. That whole drain stack must be solidly connected and watertight or it will leak badly (as you discovered) when heavy water flows through it. Your installer either didn't know what he was doing and tried to fudge it, or knows this is inadequate and screwed you over. You can probably resolve this by getting a reducing rubber ring to ...


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For posterity: I ended up using a lot of the steps from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szlhjn1Hfe0 I had to put some Quikrete down, and use a 3" flange that I cut shorter and at an angle so it would fit in the shallow bend. The flange was then glued into place (with tons of glue, to get a seal). Then we drilled into the concrete with a ...


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It is most likely fine. As others have pointed out, PEX comes coiled and it is completely acceptable to have it installed with curves and arcs, like this: PEX is not like copper or iron pipe. Rigid pipe is... well... rigid, so we get used to thinking of plumbing as begin built from straight sections, but that isn't the case with PEX. I'm assuming the ...


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As far as I recall (been a while - I used one of these boxes once and thought it was a cheesy product I'd never buy again) you either cut with a utility knife or smack with a hammer to break the plug free (hoping there's actually a drain pipe & trap properly installed, if you didn't install this yourself.)


1

I haven't seen Teflon do that before. It looks like a black pipe dope or sealer was applied over the Teflon to stop a leak. There are many different colors of pipe sealers. According to @Kris, Rectorseal makes a black one, #7, for use with corrosive chemicals and active solvents and it also specifies for metal pipes only. We'll never really know what's ...


2

with all the water off heat the pipe at one location then turn the water on and see if the heat moves in response to this. the heat is going to move slowly by conduction with the water off, so it may take a few tries to get a definate answer. you could perhaps measure how fast the hot spot cools, with and without water flow.


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The drawing shows the tick marks on the red part at the top. Is this part way out of adjustment? The instructions say to remove the lock nut. Isn't the brass lock nut around the edge still in place? I would remove that and see if you can turn the red and black plastic parts about 170 deg counter clockwise to give what is shown in the diagram as the factory ...


5

There are numerous water pipe freeze kits on the market. You can do a computer search for "water pipe freeze kits" or try "pipefreezekits.com". I however have never used a commercial freeze kit due to their cost. Instead of this method, I always used dry ice which was available at many ice plants. I have frozen water pipes up to 3" ...


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Do a flow test. Water will no longer flow. Note that freezing water inside a copper pipe can easily damage it. The technique in the video could conceivably be useful in some complicated emergency situation that justified the risk, but valves are put at convenient locations in water lines for a reason, and if you find you really need a valve somewhere, you'...


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This is one of those projects that you need to turn the water off, if just hot make sure no one turns another faucet on with cold and hot or water will come out once the valve stem is removed. Remove the trim There should be a nut remove the nut (it’s called the packing nut) The valve body may come out with the nut If the valve body stays turn the stem and ...


4

The pipe might be a cleanout for your drains or maybe the drain for an earlier fixture there. The black and red thing was a cap. It has been broken or sawn off. Just replace that cap with an identical one, or better, get an actual cleanout that fits the grey pipe and install that instead. I'd avoid using a compression fitting like this especially in a ...


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Just above the upper threads is a black cap. Insert a flat screwdriver slightly between the upper treads and the cap and pry it up. Then use a coin to unscrew the diverter.


1

Problem is the pipe from faucet to solenoid is mains pressure. The barb and ratchet clip style connection isn't rated for that pressure. if you can run pvc pipe for that stretch then that would be much less likely to leak. Effectively extending the mains from the faucet to a new outlet near the garden. The consequences of a big leak, are they very bad?


3

This adage has nothing specific to do with plumbing. It is a Biblical reference from Revelation 20:10 "And the devil that deceived them was cast into the lake of fire and brimstone, where the beast and the false prophet are, and shall be tormented day and night for ever and ever." What he is referring to is a job that will never be correct and ...


1

I've dealt with this recently with two shower/tubs. I'm going to assume that you mean a combo and just a shower because those (at least in my experience) go straight down. For me, it was really hard to tell which way the drain went at the bottom, but it went straight back under the tub. Please don't take this to mean that yours necessarily does. For the ...


1

It is normal to cut the drainage end of the trap tube to fit. They come long and are intended to be trimmed to fit - that's the "male" part of the slip joint normally found on the output of the trap - similar joints and trimming are typically found between the sink tailpiece and the trap entrance, though specific cases vary. There's also typically ...


2

I would be looking at using a toilet flange replacement/ extender. The problem may be you will have to remove the lead. Most of the old timers that did use lead were not using it by the late 70’s but if they came into a problem they would still use lead as they were more comfortable with lead than plastic. Another thing there were not as many available ...


1

Any bolt of the correct thread pitch would work. I'd suggest taking it to your local hardware store and browsing the selection until you find one that matches. I would recommend stainless steel so it doesn't rust and/or get nasty looking, brass would be a good alternative, though it wouldn't match in terms of color. Galvanized steel would be a second place. ...


0

If your wall pipe is 1 1/2" and you're installing 1 1/2", you'll want some kind of non-glue coupling (seriously, don't glue that tail piece on). There's one in the drain section for slip-joint coupling, but if you don't care about aesthetics ( I have mine in a cabinet so it's not a big deal to me, but I can't tell if this would be exposed or not), ...


2

That's overkill. All you need is a heat exchanger. It's vital to separate the system that can boil from the system that can't boil. PWR/VVER nuclear reactors have a similar heat exchanger separating the "must not boil" section from the "OK to boil" section. A gas water heater avoids the problem of boiling by simply regulating the gas ...


2

Polypropylene to copper drain with male thread You should use a rubber 1 1/2" slip-joint gasket for this connection. Polypropylene to Oatey Sure-Vent What you have should work fine, as long as the tapered edge of the slip-joint washer fits into the ID of the fitting (as opposed to butting up against it...)


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Assuming you are talking about using this valve for the application in your picture where it shows a valve, it will not work. It is the wrong valve for your application. It is 3/8" compression on both sides. The valve you are looking for is much more common than the valve in your link. You need a 1/2" nominal comp. inlet (5/8" o.d.) x 3/8"...


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