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If they had cut the pipe back a bit closer to where it comes out of the wall, they would have had straight pipe to tighten the compression fitting on and everything would have worked. Suggest getting a new reducing fitting and correct glue, using a hacksaw blade to cut the pipe back a few inches and gluing the new fitting on. Everything should tighten up ...


1

Looks like 1/4 inch soft copper. Uninstall the faucet and take it out of the counter so you can get a better look and work easily. Looks like the original fitting was braised on with a torch so you can re use it. Get a torch and plumber's solder as well as sandpaper and flux. Use a hacksaw or plumbing pipe cutter to carefully cut the pipe off where it is ...


2

Forget about epoxy for fixing that. The pipe is too damaged and being crushed in like that will definitely affect water pressure out of the faucet. You're looking at cutting out the bad section and using compression fittings or sweating in a new section of pipe or just connecting the to ends after removing the damaged area. Trying to do this under the sink ...


2

What is missing on this setup is the compression nut. It should fit over your 1 1/2 inch drain pipe going into the wall stub. When you tighten it down the inner gasket will seal around the drain and prevent water and odor from escaping into the room. This looks like a poor diy job. The problem may have been that the bend in the drain pipe before the Marvel ...


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It's an easy fix. There should be a compression washer and nut on that slip joint. It's hard to see but it looks like the drain tube is small for that fitting and will require a suitable washer or an adapter. And it looks like the trap is too close for the compression nut to fit properly so you may need to turn it 90 degrees towards the front of the ...


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With the information gathered from the comments, considering you are the tenant of an apartment, I would suggest not repairing things yourself under a rental agreement. In jurisdictions such as the US and Canada, doing work to fix things, even if it is an improvement, can be considered damage, and you can be held liable for that. If you have informed ...


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That bench is beyond economical repair, or practical, repair. If all the rotten wood were cut out the hole would probably be three times larger. As a band-aid get a scrap of Formica sheet (or similar kitchen laminate) and fix it to the surface with duct tape. the tape may need to be renewed every week.


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In both cases I see a U shaped metal foot that attached to the fitting by two spurs that pass through hole in it, This is probably tigtened (and loosened) from above. however if you spread the arms of the U apart it will let go.


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A possible "other and better" solution from IPC (which may or may not be what your local code is based on - mine is, but this specific section is then banned in the local modifications) is to increase the size at the downturn - see section 917. By making the downpipe a size larger than the input from the sink, the downpipe cannot be filled to the ...


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Thanks for the help, so you would suggest piping it something like this?


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Countertops are custom cut for the space and the sink. The space on the left where you currently have a drain pan will either be cut out (no countertop underneath) or ruined by glue and mismatching discoloration. You will need a new countertop. Go to a kitchen design store, which could be a hardware superstore with a kitchen department. Choose a ...


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If you want to get a lot of ideas, just type in on your computers search bar or google "corner kitchen sinks". There you will find the names of suppliers of almost anything you can imagine. There are companies like Elkay, Strickley, Dayton, and others. You could also go to the Home Depot or Lowes in your area to get ideas on design, construction, ...


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A couple of options 1 Look for metal legs for example these (perhaps too ornate) ones 2 a pair of legs made custom for those large square holes near the front. Either way add basin brackets with spacers at A plus adhesive at B. You need front legs. People will lean or even sit on it.


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The pressure may be slightly reduced while in use. Most homes have at least 1/2” plumbing and the sink cartridges usually have ~1/8” orifices in the faucet on each side so if you turn all 4 on at the same time you probably will notice a difference but not a significant one. Now a tub faucet that would be a different answer.


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