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I have always heard those type are called pop up drain plugs , it looks like yours is missing the rubber seal. If when you press it it drops down and press again it pops up you probably only need to find the rubber seal.


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Search popup click drain plug. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=popup+click++drain+plug&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images


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Buy some wall mounts. You should be able to find new or used (Salvage yard, Ebay, Hardware store) mounts that will work. Most are just an angled piece of cast iron or steel that the sink hangs on. Since your sink has legs most of the weight will be on the legs and the wall brackets will keep it from falling forward.


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You have what is called an adjustable P-trap. The horizontal leg that runs into the slip-joint fitting at the wall pipe can be moved in and out of the wall pipe. You simply loosen the slip-joint nut in your picture and slide the trap arm further in to make the whole trap assembly move closer to the wall: It looks to me like you have at least another inch of ...


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I assume your asking about how to tie your sink drain to the wall stub. Standard 1 1/2" PVC drain pipe has slp compression fittings that give you a lot of flexibility in setting up your P trap and drain. In most cases you can make adjustments without shortening the wall stub. However, in some cases you may have to shorten the wall stub. If you ...


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You might need to use a Fernco coupling to get everything hooked back up. It's a rubber coupling with hose clamps to hold the rubber in place like this: Source: SupplyHouse.com No endorsement of the vendor intended or implied - they just had a nice pic. I'd use it on the 1 1/2" pipe up to the 2nd floor. Slide it on the 1 1/2" pipe, up and out of ...


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I'd use a 2" to the basement, 1.5" to sink and 1.5" to upstairs. Glue the section of the tee to the basement first, then get your straight 1.5" piece and glue it to the top of the tee. Get a pvc slip connector for the 1.5" to 1.5" pipes. Get all your pieces and play around with them to see the best way to position them to the ...


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You need a spud wrench to hold the upper drain flange (which is threaded to the lower drain assembly) so you can unscrew the drain from the flange. Cheap ones (which are hard to hold) look like this: Good ones (which are easy to hold with a large wrench) look like this: And like it or not, you need a helper to either hold from above or turn from below ...


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That's the tail-piece of the drain. It appears that yours has a rubber gasket under the bowl, and that the gasket has failed. Put a bucket under the trap (that's called a "P-trap", BTW, not a "U-trap") I'm not sure what you mean by "unusual" and "wider", this looks reasonable from this angle. If it's working, don't ...


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The trap looks standard to me. What you're pointing at is just a drain assembly nut, but replacing that won't fix your leak. I'd replace the entire popup drain assembly. They aren't that expensive and you'll have nice shiny parts on top. This diagram gives you a better idea what's involved. Your part is labeled "Lock Nut". source


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I ran into this problem recently and found this thread while looking for a solution. In my case it turned out I had swapped the hot and cold handles (they aren't labeled). The taps turned correctly after I swapped


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To answer your question, “Can a novice ..do it in place”. Yes you could, but I would NOT. The hole for the sink is normally cut out before the countertop is installed, with water flowing on the quartz as it is being cut. All the mess is made outside. I just had this done recently. I have done major DIY project, consider myself capable with a power ...


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