New answers tagged

1

Aerogel is brittle, easily damaged and extremely expensive. Thirty dollars per cubic inch sounds more likely than per cubic foot. There's a web site for aerogel and related products. The linked product is a silica disk, about an inch around and less than 3/8" thick. US$35 fits in with the expected price. The same site also offers composite blankets. It'...


1

Got it open: I soaked everything with penetrating oil (inside & outside). Then I gently tapped the latch until it moved and the top opened up a bit. After a bit of wiggling, it opened. As you can see in the first pic, it's like drawing B. However, you can pull it out and get something like drawing A, but once everything is fully lubricated and ...


1

Those overhead clear panels are assuredly not the standard single thickness window glass. If glass is used in an application like this it is going to have to be a tempered glass. Thickness required would be dependent upon the width and length if each panel. I would not be surprised to find glass being close to 3/8" if not even 1/2" thick. Glass ...


0

It appears you pull down the latch at the top and the top of the window pushes in to the building and the bottom pushes out. Hard to tell for sure because the photos aren't real clear. I would try to scrape it with a screwdriver or putty knife to remove any rust around the frame, perhaps soak that hinge pin with oil a day or two before. I wouldn't pound on ...


1

you can use this far better frost avoidance and cold draft reduction . good to -40’C https://www.homerepairtutor.com/how-to-weatherize-windows-with-plastic-film-insulation/ I made insert frames and heat shrunk onto then remove and store in spring. But getting an air flow seal is best. They will inflate if not tight. Easy to install with a hair dryer, not ...


2

You could use rigid styrofoam boards cut to the size you need and use a "friction fit" cut to hold them in place Those panels are easy to cut with a box cutter knife and are rated at an R5/inch. They are sold at most home stores (orange or blue) for about $20 to $25 a 4X8' sheet. This may be a better choice than a water heater blanket.


0

Highly resinous pine studs can get very hard with age. You should drill the pilot hole the full depth that the screw will go into the stud then a little past that. Often the diameter of the pilot hole must be increased over the recommended. The drill you used (1/16") is very small. When you get your new screws you will probably need to use a 1/8" ...


1

They're just called "valence clips", but that likely varies by manufacturer. They're proprietary, so you'll either need to contact the manufacturer or do some trial-and-error with parts from other vendors. Chances are they'll often fit the valence, but they may not fit the blind channel as well. You could also just use double-stick foam tape, self-...


0

move the screen outdoors so that it fills the space between the fixed part of the window and the window frame.


0

That looks like regular dried-up old glazing putty. If it was me I would soften it using a heat gun while scraping it with a putty knife or similar tool. Then I would rig a guide on my router and remove all remaining putty (and maybe a thin bit of the wood) with the router. I might use a paintbrush to soak it with mineral spirits prior to routing, to reduce ...


2

A humble solution I have seen in a temperate climate is to use whole mattresses in deep-set windows. Looks terrible but works well.


2

Fit shutters, been “standard” on chalets in Switzerland for over 200 years. You could make the shutters perform even better by making them with an insulation layer as well. Fitted well that would start to get closer to the r value of the wall.


1

Fit shutters, been “standard” on chalets in Switzerland for over 200 years. You could make the shutters perform even better by making them with an insulation layer as well. Fitted well that would start to get closer to the r value of the wall.


1

I always strongly recommend the 3M plastic insulation kits. One of their main products is transparent tape and that is what fails with other brands. Insulating too much might mean you are risking condensation between layers or similar. In the winter the air is dry enough for this to be unlikely. I have never seen it. The kits come in Inside and Outside ...


4

As others have answered, the main consideration is indeed where you are trapping the heat. Even in watery, winter sunlight, you'll be amazed how much heat ends up being absorbed into the black plastic. Depending on the glass though, it may not make all that much difference heat-wise - especially once the plastic is saturated with heat, heat will be radiated ...


8

If you are doing this for blocking light I would possibly do something different. I used aluminum foil. I applied it with a water sprayer on the glass and wiped it down. It only had to be taped at the edges and the window could still open. If you want to open the window or door, often 1/2 the glass being sealed on the inside and the other half on the outside ...


12

It does work better to have them outside. The filtering in the bags + window after is better than window + bags. I have actually tested this. Outside though like Ed mentions, really really hard to secure these. Inside they can kind of smell and it looks really bad - sunlight heat sits between bag and window. Those are your main pros/cons. If this is long ...


46

Because black surfaces absorb sunlight and convert it to heat. You don't want to accumulate that heat inside the house, usually. Of course, this assumes that you don't install and remove the covering daily. You could also use aluminum foil and avoid most of that issue. However, check where the light shining on your window will reflect to before using ...


1

A window tint film would be a great option. Make sure you pick one that goes to the trouble of publishing their solar energy rejection performance -- any which don't might reasonably be assumed not to perform very well. You could choose an architectural film (ie designed for buildings) or an automotive film. One brand I can heartily recommend is Solar Gard. ...


0

Have you contacted Velux? You may need to ask if sizing of blind has been altered since the time yours was originally purchased, or if installation method has changed.


0

As Ecnerwal noted, IRC code of 2018 required "glass within 24" of ANY doorway to have tempered glass if the glass within the 24" distance was LESS THAN 60" off the floor level".


0

Are you sure that the weep holes are not blocked? This issue should be notated in your owner's manual. Otherwise, the window may not have been correctly sloped and flashed in the frame, and it took this long for water infiltration to evidence. Is there rot on the underside of the window, when opened? Older Pella awning windows had a problem similar to this.


1

Thermal draperies may be the best option. They can be opened when needed. The fabric is available to make your own at JoAnne Fabric, but ready mades are inexpensive and readily available.


0

We ended up instead purchasing blinds from a blinds shop, and the installation was cheap so they sent a tech out to install them. He simply screwed the blind brackets into the corner bead at the fronts of the window sill (so, within 1-1/4" from the front corner, assuming you have a standard size corner bead). He said that that's their typical ...


1

Typical approach for modern screens/windows (as Jack has shown the very vintage approach) is that the screen has a frame (typically aluminum) that has springs on one side or two sides so it can be fitted into the slot by compressing the springs, and when released is held in the slot by spring pressure. The sill is "trackless" so it won't trap water ...


3

The foam weatherstripping you linked is 1.5 inches (38 mm) wide. Just turn it sideways and attach it to the face of the bottom of the screen instead of to the top of the sill. If you had 0.5 inches (12.5 mm) of material hanging off the bottom of the window you'd still have 1 inch (25 mm) of material stuck to the frame. I'd put some staples in it just to make ...


4

The answer is - it doesn't matter. Whether the debris is grime and dirt or mold... It won't "hurt" you as there is a glass barrier in between. There isn't a different way to handle it. As a typical home owner without industrial tools, you really have no way of resealing your windows. So basically a seal has failed on your window. You can either ...


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