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0

The easy way...that wont blow up your home.....run a new gas line off the 500 gal line that goes to the house to the bar b. Other wise be safe pay the 4 bucks a gal


0

My pilot would light, main burners would come on for about 30 seconds, then go out. Sometimes if you turned the thermostat all the way up it would burn slightly longer. I used some contact cleaner I had handy, and blew out the orifice for the pilot light. Now have a nice blue flame, and no more issues! Apparently the pilot flame was not quite hot enough to ...


1

Type K has thickest wall. Example Only; 1/2 inch nominal size has a 5/8 outside diameter and a little over a half inch inside diameter 0.527-in. Type K wall is .049, Type L wall is .040 and Type M wall is .028. Thinner wall is of course easier to bend, but may not be as puncture resistant as thicker wall tubing. Copper tubing should only be used for propane (...


6

When I asked our builder and the gas supplier about this, I was told unequivocally no. None of them wanted to get involved in any way in allowing a homeowner to be able to fill a propane tank. I was told that this was a "safety issue". As has been typical, the people I was actually talking to don't know the code chapter and verse and so could not of course ...


1

I'm still alive and nothing's blown up... yet. After watching this tutorial and calling the shop that sold me the parts, I found out that the reason for the leak was that the flare-end of one fitting was attached to the stove. So I took apart everything, cleaned everything well, and then attached both "flare-end" fittings directly to both ends of the hose ...


5

As others have indicated, there is a very real danger that you have damaged the fitting in an attempt to fix it. Further attempts to fix it can cause things to get worse. And you can solve the immediate problem, but have it corrode or fail over time. Even if you live in an area where you don't have to have a license to work on the gas connection, there ...


1

Not sure where exactly your are describing your leak is. And I am not familiar with the exact type of flare fitting used in your photo, but down here we typically use gas-rated gaskets to seal the fittings. It is not clear from your question whether this fitting supports it and if it does, whether you have the gasket, but usually it is all that's needed: ...


6

Everyone else is right. It’s supposed to be a metal-metal seal, so tape won’t do anything. Glue or caulking would not fix it, and trying to welding it or solder it won’t end nicely. Basically, Either the seal or a thread is damaged and you should get a professional to fix it. If not, your leak could not only destroy your home and possibly your neighbor’s ...


25

Repeating the comments : Do NOT use any pipe dope or tape on flare connections . They are metal to metal seals and anything on the metal sealing surface can cause a leak. Pipe threads (tapered) require dope/tape to get a good seal. I analysed a house fire once and the primary cause was a leak caused by dope on a flare fitting.


109

Stop, turn off the gas, ventilate the house, and hire a pro. If you applied teflon tape to a flare fitting, you are NOT the person to be installing your gas range. You fundamentally don't understand what you are doing, and doing this wrong can blow up your house. That tends to impair the "learn from your mistakes" method of learning. This is not the place ...


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