New answers tagged

1

Bottom line, the sky is falling. All Spray foamed homes should be immediately condemned and razed - by hand of course and using only green approved processes. Then, the houses of the future will be built strictly from green recycled materials only. Of course they will be insulated using strands of non GMO flax plants hand-harvested by indigenous workers from ...


1

All of the answers here are great! Taking a noteworthy but slightly different angle on answering it: Is it safe? I agree with everyone given the pictures you showed that it doesn't seem bad, but there is plenty we cannot see. So I always give the default "we can't know" but we can give you a good guess. How is the rest of the place and is this ...


2

Yes it is mold. However it doesn't appear to be growing. It looks like the apartment had a water issue and it wasn't dried very quickly. This surface mold can be cleaned up from most things pretty quickly with soap and water - includes walls too. I would thoroughly clean everything, air things out, start a fan, and then reassess after a few weeks. For ...


2

While you're checking out where the moisture's coming from, try a few of the desiccant products available at your home stores to absorb the excess moisture. You'll be amazed at how well they work. The one pictured below I used and placed in my closet where some mildew was growing due to a leak in the cinder block wall. It really absorbed the moisture in the ...


3

I'd get a dehumidifier. Areas that don't have good air circulation like closets are more effected. What kind of heating system is your apartment on? Mold needs food (dust works) and moisture. Moisture issues typically arise when heating is insufficient, exhaust fans are not being used, or other sources of moisture are allowed to accumulate (wet bicycles ...


6

Looks more like mildew, which is related to mold, but not as dangerous (from a heath standpoint). Yes, a dehumidifier would likely help prevent mildew. I would also look for sources of the moisture, i.e. a clothes dryer that is not venting to the outside, a bathroom vent that is not functioning (or non-existent), water leaking somewhere etc.


0

I've done the cheater test before but to my mind it's not a valid test to simply trip the GFCI with the test button on the upstream, obviously anything south of it will die too provided it's connected to the load side of said GFCI. Like one person said, if the downstream 2 prongs are on the LOAD side of the GFCI, they are protected to the extent they are as ...


15

I think mark f has already answered your question well. I just wanted to add some photos from a similar project I did last year in case these are helpful to you. I installed a weatherproof cover and box to replace the old ones that supplied my above-ground pool. Fair warning: don't do this at your own pool because my installation was deficient in several ...


11

I would suggest an update to a extra duty double gang cover. Extra duty or “in use” covers are made to be used while something is plugged in. Taymac mx6200 is a cover that has 55 configurations made by Hubbell this will replace your existing cover and it has switch plates and receptacle plates that snap in so your configuration is what you need. This is a ...


7

Replace the existing cover (and switch plate) with a new two gang outdoor cover such as one like this: The new cover seals against the existing outdoor rated handy box via a weather seal. You will likely need to put a new cover plate over the switch as well. And be sure the Outlet or entire Circuit is GFCI protected since its outside.


1

Be careful, there are lots of self-interested responses regarding safety (or lack thereof) of spray foams. While I would never use spray foam nor live in a tight home (<2ACH 50) with the stuff, a well-ventilated, or typical leaky code-compliant new construction (5+ACH 50) home is unlikely to generate high exposure levels to many carcinogens. 'Dilution is ...


2

TL;DR Your older detector, statistically speaking, is likely ionization, so your newer detector, which is photoelectric (both because you said so and due to current market conditions as explained below) may do better because it is different or simply because it is newer. But either way, the problem is likely steam and not heat because standard $ 10 - $ 50 ...


1

Regarding the propane torch: virtually no risk. They can sit there forever with no impact unless you subject it to fire or similar. Regarding the property: Evidently it is very painful in Massachusetts for his property to legally become yours. https://law.justia.com/codes/massachusetts/2006/gl-pt2-toc/gl-200a-toc.html It's a good idea to have written ...


2

Your plastic project box is not NEMA rated for handling AC power. You also will have difficulty achieving hard separation inside that box between AC mains and low voltage, as ThreePhaseEel discusses. Why run THHN in conduit, when you could run thermostat wire? Put the relay in the AC mains equipment and use the thermostat wire to carry 24V relay coil ...


4

Your relay-on-a-switch-loop is fine in general... Your relay-on-a-switch-loop turns out to be up to Code after all -- NEC 300.3(B) only requires the neutral ("grounded conductor") to be in the same conduit as the hots if it's necessary to route the neutral to a location to begin with (note that the wording about "grounded conductor" is ...


1

What you're doing is basically a switch loop through your control panel and three way switch. I believe this will be a violation of 300.3(B). 300.3(B) Conductors of the Same Circuit. All conductors of the same circuit and, where used, the grounded conductor and all equipment grounding conductors and bonding conductors shall be contained within the same ...


2

I need to post this as an answer, bc I don't have enough room in the comment response. This is an interesting and creative project. But I don't think it will operate as you hope. What is the "automation control"? A timer? Motion sensor? Remote control? Magic wand? If the relay is open and the user toggles the 3-way switch to turn on the light and ...


7

You don't need a license to operate a plumbing torch. There's no danger of it spontaneously exploding if you keep it away from heat sources and open flames. He hasn't dealt with you punctually because he's an unreliable flake. Look up laws for abandoned property in your locality. Eventually his tools become your tools.


1

Unfortunately it is not uncommon for workers to be less than careful or less than thorough in clean up. (nor could i say it is common) Is it "normal" ? There is no way to answer that question. If they were "trying" to do a clean up then it would seem that there is a company policy in place to do it but maybe it was not executed properly....


-1

You can rent a magnetic sweeper from an equipment rental yard. I hope the roofers take care of it for you, but if they don't, rent the right tool for the job; don't spend a ton of time MacGuyvering something.


0

Magnets. If you have a rake that is metal, you can put magnets on the teeth. I would twine them in place a little, and not expect to be too rough with it. Maybe even use it upside down. Other than that you're looking at a more manual process.


0

Lazy workers. You may want to try calling them back. Show them what you found. Hopefully a few nails are still in the grass waiting to be found. If they're smart - and want a recommendation from you for other jobs - then the boss will come back with one of his better workers to do a magnet search for more. If they won't come back then that doesn't bode well ...


2

I was researching whether I should be concerned with paper towels used in changing oil on my cars and came upon this thread. One of the other sites I visited was firehouse.com and the link to the information below is https://www.firehouse.com/rescue/article/10528863/the-phenomenon-of-spontaneous-combustion. They seem quite positive that there is no ...


13

DANGER, WILL ROBINSON The glass doesn't stop the microwaves. The mesh does. However, without that glass in place, the chance of something else going wrong - e.g., that foil coming off or some other part coming loose, is drastically increased. As far as replacing with plastic, I definitely don't recommend it. I'm not against plastic for certain repairs - e.g.,...


5

There is no need for wire nuts in any such appliance, and this is a design from someone clueless, and made in a shop that makes stuff for US markets. Nothing sold in Europe should ever have wire nuts in it - it's a clear giveaway. Unless you modify it to have double insulation or be properly grounded, and get rid of all the other design mistakes - I'd not ...


4

Devices should be listed and approved by a recognized testing agency / authority, such as UL (Underwriter Laboratories). Anything that doesn't carry an approval rating by such an agency is potentially dangerous and should not be used. Some great answers point out what's wrong with the design of the lamp, but an easy way to always stay safe is, always look ...


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