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From the link you posted: The dimmer is rated for up to 210W of halogens with or without transformer. So if you have 6x 20W 12V halogen bulbs, total 120W, it's okay. You should check the power on the bulbs to make sure they're not 50W halogen bulbs, in which case it would exceed the rated power of the dimmer, although 12V 50W are pretty rare. When your ...


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To prevent a fire (caused by current overheating), I like to know how much current must flow through the wire and ensure that wiring provide plenty of current capacity. You can install a fuse to ensure that the a short or similar will not cause the wire to overheat and start a fire.


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Whatever wire you use, if it's going into construction, make sure it is rated for the purpose. The most common misuse I've seen is lack of FT4 rating.. I'm not going to list every type of suitable wire because it would be rather long and time consuming, especially if you're willing to run conduit. For LVDC voltage controlled LEDs, I'm personally partial to ...


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Speaker wire works well for this, and you can get in-wall rated speaker wire, which usually has a 2nd common insulation around both insulated wires (like cat5). You can of course use regular mains-rated wiring in wall, but it's hard to tuck into tight spaces where you might want to hide an LED strip, and connecting to it legally takes a lot of space. Buy ...


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Natural gas has a chemical called Mercaptan the human nose can detect this at ~1 part per billion so probably not that. Excess carbon dioxide the stuff you exhale can cause your symptoms and newer tightly sealed homes can allow the carbon dioxide to build up. You may have make up air on your furnace a small amount drawn in from outside. Because of dirty air ...


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There are combined CO/NG detectors, very cheap. The best NG detector is your nose. Your air filter will not filter either of these gases, they will pass through. If you have an electrostatic air filter it might set NG aflame .... that would certainly alert you to it. The stuff in your air filter could be grey, black, brown, white ... it really depends ...


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No. You are correct. Pressing the test button is an electrical test which should do absolutely nothing without power. If that is happening, either the wiring is not what you expect or the GFI outlet is defective. I suggest completely unwiring the GFI outlet to determine which is the cause. PS. It should not be necessary to remove the cover to determine if ...


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Ok 2 parts, yes you are misunderstanding how a (listed) GFCI completes its test. The test is completed by the internal circuitry creating an imbalance. The clicking noise you hear is the mechanical debounce that helps the reset function work better (not all GFCI’s use this method but many do because who would trust a micro switch smaller than a pencil ...


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When digging near other connections, or utilities, consider using a pressure washer to dig! It works amazingly. Its messy though. We used a gas powered pressure washer, and even in our hard southern Arizona caliche clay ground, it was much quicker than any digging other than the ditch-witch for the trenches NOT near any critical utilities.


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Your picture is actually showing the incorrect way to use the shackle. It is dangerous to leave the shackle like this when not in use. In your picture the breaker is ON. The shackle should be in the open position (pulled back away from the breaker and just hanging free) when the breaker is on to allow the breaker to trip when it needs to otherwise possibly ...


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Ikea, and other providers, have no clue as to what wall their bookcases (and other furniture) might be destined for. Several different constructions come to mind, each needing a different screw/fixing for the bracket. They could furnish all kinds of fixings, but then some customers would use an inappropriate one, and there could be legals involved. Much ...


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The obvious answer is that they sometimes don't include them by default because not everybody needs them, so omitting them would reduce cost (and waste). The premise of "why don't they come with wall mounting screws included?" isn't true; sometimes they do. If they don't, you can ask IKEA for wall mounting screws, which they will provide for free.


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I would not be overly concerned about this unless it was the highest point in your plumbing or if you had low water pressure from the water supply (or if you are on well water). These couple of inches extra should be flushed with water at all times and recycled with the rest of the water supply. There is no reason to believe that the water in these small ...


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You want moderately heavy leather (or an abrasion-resistant alternative), and you want a good fit. Firstly, angle grinders aren't very dangerous. Abrasive wheels can go through leather fairly quickly, but it takes a lot of force. The vast majority of hand contact will be quick and light. You won't even notice it. I've even bumped bare skin against abrasive ...


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Before i retired 14 years ago, I used an angle grinder many times during the work week. My answer is simple, any glove of any design and/or material is better than no glove at all. The glove you use is not supposed to provide you with 100% safety especially if you do not use common sense and a good work ethic. The glove is supposed to help protect you ...


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From the linked assembly instructions: Screw(s) and plug(s) for the wall are not included. Assess the suitability of the wall to ensure that it will withstand the forces generated. Use screw(s) and plug(s) suitable for your walls and the intended load. If you are uncertain, seek professional advice. Read and follow each step of the instruction carefully If ...


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While they are 100% sure what type and size of fastener is required for assembling the product, they have no control over the type of wall/support you are installing/fastening the product to (concrete, masonry, wood..etc). It may have recommendation in the instruction sheet, with the type and size indicated for varies types of support medium, and indicating ...


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You should be aware that your electrical code may not allow you to bury a splice, meaning a splice has to be in a box and the box must remain accessible. The way you're talking about extending a wire, you should be aware of this. The exception I can think of is that for underground runs you can get splice kits meant for direct burial.


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Nothing that this question comes from the electronics stack, from a presumed electronics person. I have a question for you... if solder is such a great conductor, why don't they make wires out of it? Heh... it's not. It's rubbish as a conductor. Go look up its actual conductivity. Solder is selected because of its other traits - melting point, flow, ...


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I'd use a lever-lock style of wire connector Given that your profile says you're in Germany, you should have no trouble getting lever-lock style wire connectors (Wago calls these a Lever-Nut™) and matching carrier boxes for them. These are approved for splicing basically worldwide, and provide a far more foolproof splice than just about any other device I'...


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Soldering won't really help, is easy to do wrong, is hard to service later, and may not be legal in your country. If installed properly I've never seen a 10¢ twist on wire connector fail, but if you really want to enter overkill category you could use a $10 insulated set screw connector. Given the choice I sleep best using a 10¢ connector in my own home. But ...


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5kW represents quite a lot of amps. Just twisting wires together isn't adequate. Over time, the copper will oxidise, and the joint will deteriorate. Soldering, then properly insulating, the joint would work. Alternatively, use terminal blocks or compression terminals (such as Wago blocks).


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