New answers tagged

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Sometimes you just get a wall like that. I have similar spot in my house, where detector beeps over several foot of wall. Electrician just laughed at it, but didn't suggest any fixes, so it is probably ok. It may be connected to moisture, grounding wires grounding in wall itself, induction from cables and so on. If you have a neon voltage probe (the "...


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Working with both hands, as is required to mount a light fixture, while standing at the top of an extension ladder, is one of the few things I do not do DIY. Adding to the usual dangers a discomfort with the positioning of the ladder, working at a roof peak above both an overhang and a set of steps, and being very high .. all that adds up to me as "...


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You want a ladder with good, wide, wheeled standoffs. You can get them as attachments rather than have to buy a whole new ladder. That way, I'd say your 22ft might just be long enough. If you get a ladder that reaches to the gable or beyond, you'll have to contend with either a sloped resting point at the top, or moving the base partway onto the grass - ...


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People are much to scared. I've been up and down ladders all my life on countless houses. This situation is decently safe because the roof overhang will prohibit the ladder from tipping to one side or the other. Yes, a lawn mover to keep the ladder from sliding outward is a good idea. In my mind, I call that distance '2 and 1/2 stories'. A standard 32 foot ...


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As an alternative you could consider hiring someone who has a truck with a bucket lift. Some companies that perform power washing also hang Christmas lights in the off season with the same truck, and perhaps they are able to perform that portion of the installation for you. The cost of this approach would be offset by the cost & effort you save by not ...


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Yes the ladder-standing-on-roof technique can work. But in your case it won't be safe at least because of the angle. Even if the ladder feet were placed at the edge of the porch roof, right next to the rain gutter, the ladder's angle reaching up to the peak of the gable would still be too steep. It would be prone to tipping backward away from the house while ...


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It's pretty much the same logic that always, under any circumstances, forbids you to cross a road on a red light. Obviously, if you understand how the traffic is organized and carefully look for incoming cars before crossing, nothing bad will happen. However, if you get a habit of breaking the rules, there will be a risk. The same will happen with extension ...


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One more important reason: Coiled cable. Because your extension cord is 20 feet and you only need 5, so why not roll the rest into neat circle? Don't. Coiled cable will heat up rapidly with no way to dissipate the energy. Good quality extension cords will have a current rating "when unrolled" and "when coiled" - the second one will be ...


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One thing that is not explicitly mentioned here is something that used to happen to me when welding at a client site. - we have long extension cables (heavy duty) which easily run the welders. if, when the length is not needed, we leave them wound-up the customer experiences their earth leakage tripping more often, and the cables get much hotter ( to the ...


4

In addition to other good answers, often there usually isn't a perfect zero-resistance connection where the plug fits and holds in the socket purely by friction. If one is using an appliance with a high current draw for a period of time, if any part of the connection gets warm/hot/overheated before the wires themselves, typically its where it plugs into the ...


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Quite simply, it's the law in most states as around 40 states have adopted the international fire code. The International Code Council (ICC) covers space heaters under the International Fire Code, Section 605.10.1-4. The code lists under what occupancies space heaters can be used, it specifies that only listed and labeled portable space heaters can be used, ...


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Lawyers, pure and simple. When you start a fire with an electric heater plugged into an exension cord, even if the extension cord is massively over-adequate and properly protected from damage, you were "violating manufacturer's instructions" and they are off the hook, legally, even if the fire had nothing to do with the extension cord. It's "...


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The common failure mode I am familiar with is plugging two (or sometimes even more) heating appliances in the extension cord sockets. The problem is, breakers don't react quickly to mild (e.g. 2x or 4x) overloads. This is both a technology limitation of the traditional fuses and an engineered feature of the newer electronic protection devices - in order to ...


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Well, you really nailed it. It's the fact that normal everyday garden variety extension cords are usually 16 AWG, or maybe 14 AWG if you're lucky. The reality is, an extension cord, properly sized for the load, would pose no safety issue, other then potentially being damaged from grandma's proverbial rocking chair, but then again, we have AFCI breakers to ...


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In addition to the already stated "shouldn't use a flimsy little 18 gauge extension cord", which would have a definite overheating problem, two specifics come to mind: Tripping Tripping over an extension cord is a real problem. Tripping over a cord that then moves a hot appliance into a dangerous position (on clothes or curtains etc.) is far ...


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I was just reading sinkholes can cause cracks where walls and ceiling meet, make cupboard doors swing open, and make doors and windows not close properly. If you suspect a sinkhole, call emergency services to check it out. Although it seems odd that your neighbors would also be on the sinkhole.


1

With all tools - not just power tools I take my new people on the younger side and walk them through the safety of each tool but most importantly how each tool could injure them. Here are some examples and some might seem basic but if it is an example, I have seen someone do it this way: Circular saw - Make sure your off hand is never used as a guide (use a ...


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Along with all the other good advice here, I'd add: wear some PPE. A lot of "the pros" don't bother because they know what the risk factors are and are prepared for them. Even the youtubers aren't always a good example. If you're using (say) a circular saw, then wear eye protection (glasses/googles or whatever). Wear some ear defenders - but get ...


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Circular saws scare me also. I don't own one. I don't do enough that needs one. Also. shops will cut sheet materials to the length or width you want for a small charge per cut, using a massive circular saw rig I don't know the name for. If I did need to use a circular saw, I'd probably find some training classes to learn about what to do and (critically) not ...


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They know not what they did! So this is an outdoor-rated "NEMA 3R" panel. You notice there's a very particular "dance" that the swinging door cover does in order to latch in and provide watertightness. As such, the deadfront cover has a very specific correct orientation. Therefore my original theory - that they put the deadfront on ...


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Learn how to use them. There's two ways you can do that. Trail and error. Tutelage and less error. I've never used any tool that I've haven't seen someone else use. And I've never done anything that I've haven't seen someone else do. I had an unhealthy fear of firearms; now it's just a healthy fear as I've received years worth of instruction from someone ...


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I can relate completely to the fear you're speaking about. I had a massive fear when I was learning how to drive. Later in life, it took me time to get past the fear for simpler tools (like my drill press). I now have a router, but I haven't yet worked up the courage to try it out. Here's how I see the problem: Unfamiliarity plus sensory overload (or ...


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For me, it was getting a drill with variable speed. A long time ago, electric drills used to just have a switch - click, and it is on at full speed. When I first used a modern cordless drill that I was able to start slowly, it made me realise that I am in control of the tool. I suggest that you build your confidence with these variable speed tools, like ...


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It is good that you think about the dangers. You will get over your fears as soon as you understand the dangers involved. Portable powertools differ. Something like an power-sander or a dremel should be safe (I let my 4year old one work on a scrap-piece of plywood with a dremel, he had safety googles, earmuffs, gloves and a great time). Jigsaws should be ...


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There is nothing to fear. Don't panic. Don't think about having your hands and fingers chopped off, but think of the job that you are trying to get done. If you are afraid of the tool getting out of control, then just get a tighter grip. If you do these two things, you will be, and might feel, alot safer.


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What you want is a repectful fear of the tools. They can indeed seriously injure or kill, but most often the things that cause it are because you took a shortcut or didn't pay attention. Do you drive a car? Cars kill tons of folks every year, yet millions of folks use them to safely get where they need to go. The first thing I told my kids about driving the ...


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Experience: Fear is just an acute awareness around the dangers — it's natural and it'll go away with time. Workspace supports: One of my biggest worries is the flex in long pieces as it sits in the tool — purchase roller stands or telescoping saw horses or create your own supports. It'll prevent kickback on circle saws and partially free your hands, e.g. you ...


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These two statements are incompatible: Fear of using power tools and Circular saw, jointer and table saw The former tells me you have almost no experience doing DIY so a jointer and a table saw are not beginner tools. I bought a circular saw and compound sliding miter saw first, 4 years later a table saw, and have yet to buy a jointer. I've renovated my ...


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The circular saw and table saw are more noisy than dangerous (well, they ARE dangerous, but few rules can save all your fingers). The noise is what makes a lot of people scared (even if other things can be equally bad). The noise is what forces novices to make nervous movements and less than objective judgements. Get hearing protectors. Other safety gear ...


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You don't need powertools, especially if your livelihood doesn't include woodworking. Woodworking is a kind of meditation for me, and I could not relax while using powertools. Sure, it's slower with hand tools, but being fast really is not the goal. And this way, I know I cannot lose a finger during a second of inattention. It's possible to create awesome ...


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Get a lot of practice. To start, go buy (or dumpster-dive) some cheap plywood. Then cut it into little pieces and throw them away. Just burn the wood as practice cuts - don't try to "make" anything. You'll want to start by practicing small things (cross-cut some 2x4's, cut 12" pieces of plywood, etc.), then work up to practicing cuts across a ...


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Fear will lessen once you are familiar with the tools operation. To build familiarity… Read the instructions before using a new tool. Watch videos online to familiarise yourself with how the tool works, (Start with the manufacturers website first). Look at the blade and figure out how it cuts and which way it runs (with the tool unplugged). Be careful with ...


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Check with your park districts and your community colleges for information on their wood working classes. Many offer classes on hand and power tools. You could also check with some local carpenters and cabinet makers for some individual instruction on the tools you're interested in.


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