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You might feel the need to tell your friends about it. Or buy it with a credit card, or from a company that will deliver it and perhaps be seen doing so, thus providing information that you have a safe at home. Word might spread to people who will either rip it out of your house wholesale if small, or force you to open it in the middle of the night by ...


2

It is safer to have no valuables in the house. But if you do have valuables a safe will slow them down. In my State firearms have to be secured, most thieves figure that's what's in the safe. Most firearms fetch less than $100, so it isn't really worth the time it takes to break it open. Cheap safes are easy to open, but thieves also know the cheaper the ...


5

High voltages may be present inside the TV, and eliminating ground does not make the electricity harmless in water. When energized electrodes are applied to water, an electric field is created which extends far from the electrodes. Depending on the voltage, whether there's pulsing or AC, and current this can induce muscle contractions and make people and ...


4

How about bolting the TV set to the wall permanently (above the possible splashes) AND employing GFCI for all circuits that go somewhere near the pool? It is just a matter of time someone to bring a hair dryer.


21

It doesn't need to be a GFCI outlet. It needs to be GFCI protected. GFCI protection is conferred by having any particular outlet obtain power power from the LOAD side of a GFCI device somewhere. On most string-topology circuits, a single well-placed GFCI device will protect the whole circuit. If you stick a GFCI tester in there, push the button and the ...


2

Modern flourescent fittings, compact or otherwise, have a small amount of mercury vapour in them. This will have escaped when the fitting broke. You may have breathed an infinitesimally small amount of it in. This amount of vapour is so small, that any possible effects are negligible. As there was no liquid mercury in the fitting, there's not anything to ...


3

The dangers of mercury in CFLs and other fluorescent bulbs has been sensationalized in some news sources. The main health risk associated with mercury is the vapor released when it is heated or if a large quantity is sitting around evaporating into the air for some reason. Very little mercury is absorbed by your body if you swallow a small amount of ...


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TO handle piece of work @ bit Drill hand glove may be hazardous by to aovid any cut or hand injury from waste cutting chips and sharp edge ,neoprene hand gloves should be worn


0

If you don't trust the switches on your range, why should you trust your circuit breakers? Do they just seem more robust? The "fast" way to disconnect power to your range is the switch that comes pre-installed. In answer to your actual question, though - would something like this work for you? It's a "Smart Circuit Breaker", features are listed as follows: ...


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I do a lot of work on older homes and see stuff like this all the time. Keep in mind that the equipment grounding conductor (EGC), that bare safety ground, was not always present in wiring systems. If you see old homes - a little older than this one - with two-prong receptacles, those were wired back before the EGC was part of the system. I think when ...


-1

Purely technically this is an unreliable connection. Think if your screw is a little conical, the wire can slide further from the screw and become loose.It can take weeks or months to be noticeable. There should be parts which prevent the the wire sliding between the surfaces. In developed countries there should be used certified connection boxes if one ...


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I wouldn't call the contents of this box a "whole mess". It looks complex but there's nothing really weird in it. Power enters the box via cable 7 and energizes four circuits: Unswitched power is permanently provided to circuits elsewhere in the house via cable 5. This circuit is slightly strange as both the red and black wires in the 14/3w cable 5 are hot,...


1

You didn't mention what gauge the wires are, so these answers are generic: Yes, the ground wires should be tied together although there is some debate on whether this is required by code. In this case all the ground wires should be connected together in this box, and the neutrals should all similarly but separately be be connected together (note: don't mix ...


1

Everything is good now, barring some serious electrical f-up back at the breaker box's neutral bar. The bare lead was indeed a ground, which I couldn't discern without removing the old outlet. Continuity from neutral to the bare copper checked out, I wired a 240 volt grounded outlet (an NEMA 14-30R type) in its place, replaced the cord on the dryer with a ...


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