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Your profile says Seattle. The weathering of the wood says that you get a fair amount of water. That slab is too high relative to your siding and probably the threshold of your door. Modern code says 4" from top of slab to top of impermeable layer. If you are keeping the house for more than 10 years, I'd ditch the slab, set the grade to the correct ...


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$5,000 seems awful high. The entire slab appears to be a 1-2 cubic yard. (What are the actual dimensions?). I think you could DIY this pour with 1 yard from your local concrete supplier for probably $200-500 ($500 if you have to go purchase the needed tools for the job. Concrete is about $100/yd in my area). This assumes the concrete truck could pour ...


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A bunch of pieces of concrete will always be a bunch of pieces of concrete, any jointing compound that's weaker than the reinforcing bars in the concrete is at best temporary. Pavers can hide a multitude of sins.


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It would definitely be an improvement. Get some knee pads because you'll be down there for awhile. They have all sort of epoxy concrete fillers that do a great job on cracks,,, just need a clean, dry surface. Get a good concrete paint to finish off the job. That post in the back looks like it's in need of repair too. Good luck.


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Isn't it a little late to be asking that question?? Get a 2x4 and run it along the framing for the concrete, smoothing it out. Even if the concrete isn't totally smooth, when you install the tile you can smooth the rough surface of the concrete with the mortar... If the slab you poured has the proper slope make sure each tile is flush with the slab and ...


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The walkways are exposed aggregate and the courtyard is not right. I have done many exposed jobs over the years and a retarder is not needed but you don’t wait until the next day either. Most jobs I use additional rock sprinkled on top and worked in yours appears to have salt & pepper (black and white rocks) and the new pour was just plain concrete. You ...


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I agree that it's not a match, old vs new. And wether they did it right is a hard call unless you have pictures to provide their process. I've seen poured concrete with for walkways which are as shallows as 2" thick. I wouldn't accept anything shallower. One thing to consider, if you like the exposed aggregate look is epoxy stone. It looks really good over ...


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I think they totally messed it up if the plan was to match that first picture. I've watch contractors install Chattahoochee patios, which are similar and they have to add the stone right after pouring and smoothing the slab. They might be able to do an acid wash to remove some of the concrete and give you what you paid for.


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It is a personal preference to seal or not to seal. I have sand stone night stands. When we purchased I sealed incase I knock a cup of coffee over or spill something that would stain the surface I don’t want it looking bad. Yes things have spilled and they still look good. Another possible reason for sealing outside work is if it freezes hard. At my current ...


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