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Like Ed Beal suggested in a comment, you mostly need to drive your shims in more assertively. However, I'd use plenty of construction adhesive as well. Remove the shims now in place if they'll come out with a little effort. Blow or vacuum out all dust and debris. Inject plenty of heavy-duty construction adhesive into all gaps. Firmly drive pressure-...


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Hmmm...so many issues. I’ll start with two: 1) why you experience a squeaking noise, and 2) why I hate those pre-cast footing supports. 1) The footing is pre-cast...not poured in place. Some have metal clips cast into them...this one does not. This one probably has a hole for a metal connector to fit in, like this one. Unfortunately, this type of ...


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If you're in direct contact with the engineer, I'd go back to him with Hey, Mr. Engineer, this is pretty cool! Let me ask you something, though. From my uneducated non-engineer's perspective, this doesn't quite make sense, would you explain this to me? i.e. acknowledge that he's the engineer, you're just Joe Citizen and ask him to talk it through with ...


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Trimmers are designed to support the total load without crushing the fibers in the wood beam where it rests on the trimmer or from crushing the trimmer. The engineer notes in the letter that the new beam is to support the second floor (one floor). There are no dimensions given, but using 2x8 floor joists at 16” on center, They can span about 12’-9” maximum,...


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None of us can really answer this with confidence, not having all necessary information (or, in my case, an engineering degree). I will offer a few assumptions and suggestions based on the engineer's drawing: A tripled, relatively squat beam is probably being used to maximize head clearance. More typically this would be a doubled 9-7/8" beam, which rests ...


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I think I see what you want to do. You want to run two joists 11' across your garage 42" apart, and use 42" x 46" pallet rack for the floor rather than the usual plywood, and you're trying to determine what size joist to use. The usual span tables are not quite right to answer this question. The span tables that are published are based on the length of ...


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You could go with used 12' steel cross members and take them to a fabrication shop and have them cut to length and have mounting plates welded on in order to bolt them to your wall. Or buy the uprights that go with them take them to a fabrication shop and have them cut to length and have the brackets welded on and have the advantage of adjustable height ...


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