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1

I think (having torn into more than one wall of a 1970's home) it is much more likely that there is a small header spanning the doorway only and not the entire wall. This will mean managing the new openings you make to distribute the weight appropriately to the posts you include in your picture. Consulting an engineer on how to do this correctly would be ...


3

The right beam is not a stack of posts. It's a doubled 2x10, which almost exactly matches your original beam's size. That ~10' span could also call for doubled 2x12s. You should ask your local inspection office what they'd require. That said, you can dramatically oversize members with smaller heights to accomplish the same thing. Two 6x6 timbers would ...


0

The base plate appears to be grouted in, this is fine this will keep out water and oxygen from underneath, Don't worry about this. Your aim is keep it sealed. It shouldn't corrode. The welds themselves are fine, corrosion appears mild and surface only. The bulges on the steel are from impact damage, as most have pointed out If you want to improve this, find ...


1

Totally cosmetic, has not, will not weaken because of future rust. The only corrosion in the home is caused by water when mopping the floor and splashing the bare steel. The uniform grey color of the steel beam indicates it has a zinc rich primer. Mill scale would be nearly black and not as uniform in color. When the weld was made it burned off the zinc ...


3

I'm too am a welder. User142029 is absolutely correct.Those joints are fine. It's rusting faster because it's not the same metal as the base material. The structural integrity is fine. I would clean it as best as i could with a wire wheel / cup and cold galvy spray it. Not much you can do about the underside without removal.


2

They should have re painted the beam or any parts where they removed galvanized painting along with the welds on the beam. All steel beams come galvanized painted to prevent rust from forming... To solve this problem I would recommend doing a good cleaning to remove all the rust and oxidation to the best of your ability, then go to your local home ...


0

The rust that is on the photo looks mild and repairable. The worse problem is the possibility of rust forming on the underside of the base plate. You can't repair the underside without removing the beam. You don't even know how much rust is in there (and how much metal is left). On the other hand, you may want to find the source of the moisture that enables ...


2

There is significant corrosion present in the welds and the beam itself. Without further examination, it is impossible to determine the extent of the damage to the metals and the structural engineering impact. A competent (and licensed) engineer intimate with the properties of metal will need to evaluate this. Commercial engineering x-ray machines are ...


2

It is interesting to see that your weld joints have become rusty and seem deteriorated. Also, it is notable that both flanges have deformed (bulging) locally, the deformation could be caused by the rust pack (layers of rust steel), or worse, caused by over-stress. I think it needs more than just cleaning and repainting, which would not stop the process of ...


5

This looks like surface rust so you'll want to remove it. There are many rust removal products like Naval Jelly,etc. but I've found White vinegar to be just as good. Saturate the area with the vinegar and let it sit for 30 minutes and wipe off. A second or third coat may be necessary. Afterwards, prime the area and paint with a quality paint for steel. The ...


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