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What I ended up doing is getting a 12 ton hydrolic jack from Lowe's for $50. Stacked a bunch of lumber up to the beam, put the jack on the lumber, carefully jacked up the beam up off the post until the level sitting on my deck went true. It was raised exactly 1 1/2 inches. So I took a spare, pressure treated 2x4 and put it between the post and the beam. ...


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I have raised a similar situation , I used some ceramic tiles to raise 4X4 off the concrete blocks they are sitting on.


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80 grit is 80 grit and will work to some level but I would be worried about the life of the abrasive. 80 should rip the old stain up well but is really rough and screens on a deck sounds like the wrong tool to me.


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Posts need bolts not screws. Outside joist board not sported by cantilever. Stair stringers held up by nails and lacking brackets. Doggo is helping. 4x4s will crack and warp, and look like they're not sufficient for the job, because they aren't. How do I vertically connect two 4x4s on a deck to build a roof? But you're not splicing (I hope) so it's, ...


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I would build it around, not connected to, your deck. Bury your posts 4 feet in the ground in-cased in concrete, Use a post protectors around them for longer life. ( With the post protectors you do not have to use concrete, i would. ) This will insure that racking is minimal with the lack of room for knee bracing that you have and what little racking ...


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I would stay with 2 X lumber instead of 5/4 "decking". that will solve your dimension problem . Regular 2 X lumber is twice as strong, twice as stiff and lasts much longer, compared to 5/4 decking. My deck is 2 X 6 , 25 years old and I have made a few repairs. The community pool has some 5/4 decking ,it has been replaced twice in that same time and does not ...


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I’m not an expert and likewise did not find any direct documentation on the issue of attaching surface mount posts to a laminated beam but I did find the following information that might help you make a knowledgeable decision. The following Fine Homebuilding video references surface mounted guard posts. The main issue appears to be that the post as desired ...


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My first though was an L bracket for the post at the house. That led to my second thought. You could attach something to the house and run it out to the railing post, attach middle post to that same something. A 2x4, or a long angle iron/aluminum. I would use a 2x6 painted white. Or you could vinyl fascia board and glue two of them together for a ...


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The most appealing option would be to remove the 4x4s and buy ones that are a bit longer. Cut a 3 1/2"x3 1/2" hole in the decking and create an assembly similar to one in the image below. You could also use the same posts but shorten the height of the fence by cutting the white material and dropping the 4x4s below the deck as previously mentioned. http://...


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No problem with too much gravel. You could level it out toward the right a bit to get the gravel off the support structures for the skirting but i don't see that as a problem. The problems I usually see are not enough gravel.


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When I built my deck I used a the same joist hanger as the rest of the joists but moved it and the joist inward the thickness of the joist. Then nailed/screwed an additional joist to its face to even it up to the edge of the ledger. This worked well because it gave me twice the thickness to secure the planks and kept the nails/screws away from the edge. The ...


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I would drill a hole through the base and umbrella poles, then thread a bolt through the new hole to stop the rotation.


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Just get some rubber sheet (or other thin flexible sheet material that grips, e.g. leather) and use contact glue to attach it around the bottom of the pole; just to make the pole a bit bigger where it stabs into the base. Then the factory pole-gripping mechanism on the base should grip it tighter. If the wind is strong enough it could still move it, but you ...


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It's going to take some caution and some experimentation to arrive at a solution you can live with. For light wind Alaska Man's suggestion seems good - tighten the wing nut/loop bolt in the base. If you have tightened the wing nut/loop bolt as much as is practical (too much tightening will break something) and you are still getting spinning it's time to ...


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Marine plywood is not that different from CDX plywood they use the same glue and pre press process and hot press cure process. The main difference is in the veneer used , tight knots , with the core plugged so there are no voids compared to cdx. Even marine plywood needs to be protected from water so you will be adding a paint or other material on top , ...


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I think marine plywood is not treated and therefore not nearly as rot resistant as standard decking materials which may limit the lifespan of the deck. The slope may have to be steeper than you would think so water runs off the plywood especially if valleys form over time. That said, it’s a pretty interesting idea.


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In my experience, the most common and aesthetically pleasing way to do this would be a half-lap joint with fasteners connecting them (nails, screws, carriage bolts, pegs, etc). At this point you could also use Simpson tie connectors, or two angle braces. Wood blocking would look pretty janky and would be my last choice.


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As mentioned in my comment I would use clamps to attach one or more 2x6s or other structural piece to the back of the rim joist extending down to the pavers. You can attach it with screws through the front of the rim joist. That should give you something meaty to provide structural support to the step.


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I see no reason this need to be complicated, it can all be accomplished from the front side. Install your pavers properly at the proper height ( this is critical as it doing the yeoman's work here. ) And know-one wants a wonky landing. Construct your step on your workbench to the dimensions you need. Install a 2x6 between the stringers ( the sides ) on ...


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If I understand your description you're concerned because the posts are encased in concrete with no gravel under the posts. It would have been good to have gravel under the posts for drainage but it's not critical. Of greater concern to me is the several feet of soil they placed around the posts above the piers. Encasing the posts in concrete isn't ...


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I just went through this! The guy at Home Depot practically rolled his eyes when I asked him where to find a “swaging tool”. Turns out, just bashing the crap out of them with a hammer (on our concrete garage floor) did the trick for the FOUR cable ends/ferrules I was dealing with. Who knew! Upside: very satisfying to bash things. :D. Caveat: I’m a chicken-...


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this might do the trick. I've seen deck builders on on YouTube use this. https://www.lowes.com/pd/USP-1-1-2-in-14-Gauge-Wood-to-Wood-Triple-Zinc-Deck-Post-Tie/3376824


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Sure you can, but they need to be treated for below-grade use. Most 4x4 are not, so you may need 6x6, which tend to be treated to a further degree. Also, deck blocks are expense overkill if you're burying them, and they don't always meet the area requirement for below-grade footings. Use purpose-built cookies or a few bags of concrete mix.


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Solid-color stain is very similar to paint in appearance. I'm not sure why it wouldn't be strippable, though. That said, it would take a lot of stripper for that deck. I'd probably rent a floor sander (plate type, not drum type). Use a medium grit so you don't have such a hard time removing sander marks with fine grit later. That and a random-orbit sander ...


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That looks like paint to me. Anyway, I don't ow why you wouldn't be able to strip that off. I've done very similar jobs with great results. Get some of your favorite stripper and try a small section. I think you'll be surprised at the results.


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Beams (what you called headers) usually need to be doubled. For that size deck I'm confident that they'll carry without undue flex or risk of failure. Now, about the overhang... double the beams, which rest on the piers, and double the rim joists, which act as flush beams. Like so: ______________________________________________ |...


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I recommend the Saw Guide by Lounsbury Products. The guide makes it easy to use a circular saw and make precise cuts along the gap between decking without wandering or gouging into the boards. Watch this video to see how it works. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6K-g1KjRqUQ


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Use one piece of rope for both top and bottom. At the end posts, run the rope along the outside of the post from the top hole to the bottom hole. At some point (need not be the end) splice the rope. Or: at the ends, drill the rope holes at 90 degrees to the line of the railing, and eye splice a loop through each hole. Ease the sharp edges of the hole in the ...


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Fasten a large screw eye to the post: Then feed the rope through to make a loop and fasten it to itself with a rope clamp:


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