New answers tagged

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EKKI wood is almost indestructible .Its a African hardwood used by marine and harbor works and will last over 20 years submerged in water without rotting. If you can find a supplier it will definitely do the trick. Get your joists and decking in EKKI and it will outlast you.


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The proposal that you make is not a good idea. You would be far better off considering placing an appropriate full length 4x4 next to each if the existing posts and then raising the roof at the top. Exact suggestions are not possible to provide because no details of the existing construction have been provided beyond the use of the long 4x4 posts buried in ...


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Can you? Technically I'd say "yes" but with the disclaimer that you should not and this would likely not pass inspection (and I wouldn't do it because it's difficult to do safely, not something you'd want to DIY). It is difficult to cut 6x6 posts in a single pass, most builders will cut with a circular saw with max depth of 2", and cut from ...


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Dry rot doesn't really exist but I'll imagine you said brown rot. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_rot It sounds like your post is not 6" above grade. I'd probably just put a 6x6 sonotube into the ground and have it extend up to where the wood is still good. Add a Simpson CB66PC and bolt the post back into it. https://www.strongtie.com/...


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I wonder if you could use a Low Profile Dryer Vent like this one? (google that phrase for more options). You might be able to seal it using the stuff they use to glue PVC pipes together but that might ruin your deck. Probably caulk is the way to go.


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I wouldn't submerge anything, and ensure that all post holes are filled in concrete and sealed from any water. . With stairs and raised floors eliminate any source of water to prevent wood rot. With the cost of materials these days you can't afford a failure due to rot Anywhere!


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Start at one end and use screws. It's much easier if you have someone to assist you. Also check out the BoWrench tool. I have used this on multiple projects and it's well worth the cost especially if you are working solo.


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Consider 3 short but deep steps. You'll often find these on terraced public spaces. i.e. something like a 3.3" rise but deep enough that you have to take a full step on the same step. I'm talking about a tread run of 24-36" or so. This means that you step up, step over, step up, step over, step up to the deck surface. Of course, it takes a lot of ...


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Having done this recently I know it's a pain. I bought straight boards but by the time I installed them after waiting for a few weeks for them to dry out, they were warping. You need to get a few C clamps or something similar. Start at one end and screw the board to the end joist, then clamp the other end and tighten to see if maybe the board is flat on the ...


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Quick 'n Easy If you find that screwing it down without clamps won't resolve the issue (decking should never be nailed down), make half-depth crosscuts from underneath, centered over joists, at several locations (say every other joist). This will weaken the twisting/bending tendency of the board without unduly compromising its strength as a decking component ...


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Make every single rise absolutely identical, period. Video of people consistently tripping on NYC subway stairs which have a single non-uniform risen step I would test to see if 2 x 5.25 inch rises feel more natural or 3 x 3.5 According to https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards?catid=0&id=314: Stair riser heights shall be 7 inches (178 mm)...


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Very little pressure treated lumber is straight, most of it is twisted, crooked, cupped, bowed, etc. If you have just one bad board you got much better wood than most. Just start at one end and try to straighten it in the process of fastening it down. If you're using screws, it's pretty easy - the screws will pull the deck board into the joist. Nails will ...


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Steps should always have uniform rise. In fact, codes require it (to within 3/8" maximum total variance per IIRC). Our brains expect that the step following the first will be about the same, and it's guaranteed to cause stumbling and worse if you do it lop-sided. Splitting the height puts you square in the range given by accessibility guidelines. Be ...


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You don't even attempt to. They are already installed. You would have to take deck apart and some siding. Sleeve has to go on before sides. My take is that you need to seal this better and that is what caulk, paint, and wood sealer should do. If you keep up on those things it will last as long as it would be sleeved.


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Making some dangerous assumptions here... You'll be removing everything between the posts so that you can slip the sleeve over the top, then reattach everything, right? While you've got it all apart, take 2 of your post covers and cut one complete side off so that you've got a U shape and slip it on by pressing toward the house. You will likely have to cut ...


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I have seen decks built as you described, with the posts in concrete. Very recently I saw where concrete was poured in the bottom of the hole for a footer, and then the post was put on top of that with just dirt around it. This was to code and approved by an inspector. Post in the ground 20-30 years. I have built 3 decks recently and have put the posts on ...


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Pressure treated lumber is rated for ground contact. A common way of creating footers that I have seen is to pour concrete down in the hole, but below grade. Then just put the post on top of that and fill with dirt. I personally wouldn't do that, but I have heard of it being done. I would probably pour concrete in a tub on top of the footers and bring them ...


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Deeper Joists Stiffness Gain: ★★★★★ Cost Adjustment: ★★★ Appearance Impact: ★★★★ I assume that you've spec'd at least 2x10s for a 14' span. Bump to 2x12s on the same 16" centers for a noticeable improvement in stiffness. More Joists Stiffness Gain: ★★★★ Cost Adjustment: ★★ Appearance Impact: ★★★ Taller joists offer a greater stiffness gain, but if ...


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Give a short and simple answer because you have a relatively common deck size. 16" OC is fine. Put two rows of blocking with the same materials as the joist. The blocking should split your deck in thirds. If done well the blocking will appear to be some sort of magic beam that goes through your joists. I mention that because I always add at ...


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There are several versions of that type of bracket available. It is called a post base bracket. My local home improvement centers carry them. Here is one It is fastened to the concrete with nut and bolt. You may have problem when you remove yours as the nut and bolt are probably rusted like the bracket. I would spray them with PB Blaster several times over a ...


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I would get 4x4s the full height of the desired roof and bolt it to the outside edge of the current 4x4 the whole length using lag bolts as suggest above. Bolting a 4x4 on top of a 4x4 is never going to be that strong without a lot of cost for the mend plates etc.


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You pretty much have to use earth to correct the slope. Make a plan of the area and figure out which bits are too high and which are too low (you can measure down from the boards) then go under there with a short-handled shovel a board to sit on and a little wagon (of any colour) and start moving dirt.


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