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Kerdi is waterproof so you do not add additional barriers because as you stated, you don't want to trap moisture. Just make sure to follow all the directions and tips for successfully installing the Kerdi board.


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I don't know that there is a "perfect" way to insulate basement walls. When I built my house, 40+ years ago I did this: outside layer of foam board mastic (tar) on outside of block inside wall, 6 mil vapor barrier, taped fir studs, with high R board drywall I have not had moisture problems, but mileage will vary. One's biggest concern will be heat loss,...


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The tub gets installed first. A Fiberglass tub/shower is your water barrier. Putting anything else down does not help. The water would just be trapped between the tub and the other "water barrier" creating an environment for mold and other issues. The fact is if a tub/shower pan is installed correctly there is almost a zero chance it leaks unless ...


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Shower pan on top of the sub floor works fine. I did this recently and plumbed/installed the pan prior to installing backerboard. I recommend using Georgia pacific denshield board as backer rather than cement backer board. Its reasonably priced and doesn't required a water proofing step. Silicone all edges and bring it down to the shower pan nailing fin lip, ...


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Most of the time, installers will just wait until the tub is installed before they lay down the tile backer, and then just cut around the tub for the backer board and tile. In most cases, this is fine, but not ideal. The wood subfloor is a permeable surface, and water can easily seep between the gaps of the tub, and the edge of the backer board. The only ...


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Option 1. If you want to go crazy on water proofing then you'd install a liner on your subfloor maybe keri, use keri band to go up the walls and treat it like a shower stall, ardex 8/9 the joins then install the shower and then the tile. Unless the tile guy is saying he needs a layer of concrete board in which case you would want to install that under ...


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Plan 2, gives your the extra strength under a fiberglass pan. tile to the pan, and caulk where it meets the floor, just like a tub Plan 3, It is just wasted money and if you have to ever pull the shower pan out to address problems with plumbing it will be much more work to pull up the tile. Tell your tile guy you can find someone who is happy to ...


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The shower pan is what contains the water. Tile, grout, cement backer board, plywood, etc. will not stop water from getting out. A properly installed and drained pan will prevent any water from escaping and causing damage to the subfloor, joists, or downstairs ceiling. So the important thing is to get the shower water-tight to begin with using the ...


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Not sure if it's the "right" way, but I would go with 2). It'll be a litte more work putting the cement backer board in around the shower drain. Have to make sure you seal all the seams in the backer board with the right material, thinset+tape? I assume you're putting in a fiberglass shower base?


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To answer your question, water getting into the ground terminal of your extension cord will not trip the GFCI. If water gets into that hole though, it will probably get into the hot or neutral slot and that will trip the GFCI. Get a light with a longer cord or use some of the power cords you see in stores at Christmas time (see below). most come with covers ...


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Strictly speaking, if everything else is wired and functioning properly: The "hole" you're referring to is a ground, and it's exactly what it sounds like. That wire is connected to the ground. Water in that particular port will give you no issues. (though water across the other two blades will DEFINITELY cause issues! Your plug is not watertight - do not ...


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