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1

To answer your question, the bottom of your footing needs to be a minimum of 12” below finish grade, where you live. However, I feel you don’t understand the complexity of this project so I’m going to layout a few issues you’ll need to resolve. First, this wall will weigh about 4,800 lbs. (plus weight of your stone veneer) so if it falls over it’s a ...


-1

The naked truth is (next time wear clothing when taking pictures around mirrors) the beams are non-structural because: 1) they are not necessary due to the type of roof framing system, 2) tthe 2x6’s do not extend into the wall in the picture with the smoke alarm. I suspect the 2x6’s were fastened to the roof joists and then extended over to the wall. (Notice ...


0

I'm pretty confident they are not load bearing, however, I'm also fairly certain they are structurally needed. Without these in place, I believe your ceiling would try to collapse because the only things stopping the weight of the roof from pushing the exterior wall out, are these beams. The only way they would be aesthetic is if there were large posts ...


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These are for sure structural and tie both of the rooflines together. Suppose you have two pieces of concrete that you are pouring - let's say a patio and a set of steps. To do this right you will add rebar/anchors that bridges the two pieces. The rebar isn't there to keep the concrete forms set where they are, they are there to make sure if there is ...


1

You are not sure if the header above the doorway or the corner to the right of the doorway is load bearing. I have added yellow highlights to each of these. Really there are only two ways to know for sure. Take off the drywall at both spots and take pictures of right above them in the attic and let us inspect. Get blueprints of the house to an engineer ...


1

That’s a lot of information to review, and I’m American so I don’t know anything about metric, but I’ll try... Your layout is somewhat different than that shown in the “full report” and picture in Section 1 at Zwae.... There the glass windows are in the same wall as your dormer AND at the same level. However, in your building the dormer is in a wall 90 ...


1

You cannot really tell what is load bearing or not just from pictures of finished space. Your best bet would be if there were blue prints of the original build of the house to to analyze. Walls perpendicular to joists can very well be load bearing if there are joist that span to that partition and then overlap with another that extends to the next supporting ...


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Double top plates are used to 1) tie interior walls to exterior walls (with lapped plates), and 2) creating a perimeter chord that is tied together (lapped plates) for the roof to create a structural shear diaphragm. I doubt if your engineer did a very thorough structural analysis because your new header is greatly oversized from the original header. However,...


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This is the reason for the blocking: "additional vertical members (2x4's) to carry the load from the beam up to another load bearing object above the floor (e.g. a new column)" In other words, it's a complete load path from the beam to the foundation if it's the later, what's benefit using the block to support the column? wouldn't be better for ...


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I do work in the midwest where temp ranges between -10 and 110F. All concrete cracks is just a dumb myth. There are hairline cracks that are more typical. Mainly with suboptimal mix or not properly adding joints. However I have many pours over the past 10 years that have zero cracks because I basically use the best mix in the area and pay a good 30% more ...


1

It's hard to say if it's a structural problem without more information. The crack in the photo is not necessarily a structural problem. Most likely it's related to less than ideal subgrade, concrete mix, control joint spacing, or concrete curing conditions. Concrete is always going to crack. That crack is excessive, but most likely not a structural ...


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If you're certain the wall is not supporting any load other than itself, you could over cut the opening and fasten in a wood jamb, with double 2x header (bear the header on the vertical jambs). Although a non load-bearing wall would likely be fine without a header, it's still supporting its own weight and you will want something to fast your door to. How do ...


36

This gives all the impression that is was designed and installed to support the basement wall that the "arrow" of the diagonal bracing points to. The vertical post against that wall is what was put there to support that wall. The bottom of that post is most certainly held up against the wall securely by the bottom plate in that wall which is likely ...


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