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1

I suspect the loading on the new “flush beam” is more than the 2700 lbs. outlined in the question. I calculated 2800 lbs. and that’s without the weight of the upper wall resting on the new beam. (However, I think that would be about 250 lbs. per linear foot on the new beam.) Depending on the species and grade, a new 4x10 beam 20’ long can support about 2800 ...


0

If your brick wall is solid and sturdy, you can through-bolt a wood header the same width as your new porch, and connect the joists to it using hardware for T joint. Ideally, your posts shall be set away from the house to allow room for good foundations. You can add bracings or diagonals to maintain the squareness of the deck, and to resist the lateral load.


1

The frame is not supporting the weight of the water, but is used to provide a form for the canvas/vinyl that contains the water. Standard galvanized piping threaded into pipe fitting would be quite strong. You could use fittings like you linked to or standard threaded pipe fitting. You would need to add more vertical side braces on the sides and ends than ...


2

This is what you'll want to do (making allowances for your particular dimensions and geometry): ...and it's just my (unsolicited) two cents, but you might consider putting the door closer to the corner (at the left in your photo, where the ladder is) so that people wouldn't walk into the bathroom and directly into the toilet. (I don't seem to be able to ...


2

The strategy of adding a header to replace one or more studs is appropriate, with one caveat: The header must be adequate to carry the load of the floor above as well as any roof that's bearing at that point, if those currently rest on that wall. The header must rest on "trimmer" studs, which aren't shown in your diagram, whether it's load-bearing ...


4

If the TV weighs less than or equal to what the mount is rated for, it should be fine. However. You could upgrade to a sturdier mount rated for yet more weight, (increasing the safety factor) and perhaps of a more robust design (i.e., mounts with two sets of arms holding the TV, rather than a single arm) if it would provide "worried parent peace of mind&...


2

I had inspector come and looked into this issue. He was also not sure why it was happened like that way. He suggested to replace those two studs with new 2 studs. those two studs are just a waste right now as those are not attached to the top plate, also one of the stud is pretty old. thanks


5

In general, no. The reason is that you have quite small contact surface of each brick with the brick above or below, and also the vertical shape makes the wall less robust against shear stress (roughly speaking: force applied horizontally is multiplied by the height of the brick to compute the momentum, and the momentum is divided by the length of the brick ...


1

Per IRC, the minimum deck design live load is 40 psf, typical deck weight 10 psf, and deflection is limited to Span Length (L)/360. I will add another 10 psf misc. weight in the calculation below. Note, W10 x 15 is slightly off, but considered acceptable.


2

Hmmm...let me see if I have this correct. You’re using 14’ long joists with a 2’ overhang. So, that means your deck is 12’ wide and half that distance (6’) will be transferred back to the house and the other 6’ plus the overhang (2’) will bear on the steel beam. So the total load is 6’ + 2’ = 8’ x 50 psf = 400 plf on the steel beam. The smallest steel beam I ...


1

I would do the following: support the roof - and jack it up a 1/2” extra to enable the new one to slide in. drill and cement or epoxy the post support ( stainless is good) into place, these are usually adjustable so getting the roof level is possible. measure the required length of post - from the support to the roof and the 1/2” can be accounted for in ...


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You have 3 main issues: 1) Hold your post and roof up, 2) Hold your post and roof down, and 3) Maintain a minimum of 6” distance from the post to the ground. You need a steel connector with a mechanical anchor (bolt, etc.) to support and hold the post in position. There are several types of connectors that are suitable for retrofit applications...see below. ...


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