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2

Cat walk or rat walk is what we called them. We usually laid them flat and would staple the romex. They keep the boards from moving and cracking the Sheetrock, since you are decking the area make sure to do the same with the decking or as you move around it will damage the Sheetrock.


2

It should be fine as-is, after-all a bath full of water weighs about as much as a waterbed, and there are no special requirements for framing under bathrooms. (unless you want to lower the floor)


1

Structurally, in a word, you need to consider support. The joists alone will likely not be enough to support the added weight over time. They will start to sag. You may be able to get away with a single pillar support, and double up the spans. Or you may be able to put in two or even three supports in the area. It is hard to say without seeing the layout. ...


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I wouldn't be bolting the supports over the drywall. You will get movement back and forth from the bag and that movement will start to compact the drywall and eventually loosed the supports. Think about installing a 4x4 between two joists with joist hangers. Then drill a hole through the 4x4 and install a 1/2" eye bolt and hold it in place with nuts and ...


2

I doubt the wall between the living and dining area is structural. It appears you have a one-story (in that area) living space with roof trusses spanning 26’ from front to back of your house indicating no load don that wall. Things to consider: I’d go down in the basement below that wall and see if there is any posts coming down through the wall above, ...


3

If we're talking about any sort of engineered joist (truss, TJI), stop reading now and consult a local engineer. This answer assumes solid 2x10 lumber. I'm guessing that you don't mean a header so much as a joist fit between the sistered joists alongside. Since the span is so short (presumably 32" or less), you can use a single joist of the same height as ...


1

The inspector may have meant a vertical I-Beam. As far as how many to use, while hiring an engineer is the safest route, consider buying the For Pros By Pros "Foundations and Concrete Work" as a resource to guide you should you consider attempting (risking?) to tackle this without an engineer's help.


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Issue #1: Yes, you are correct. Those older, larger, joists (even using Douglas Fir - Larch species and Select Structural grade) they DO NOT meet the current structural code. If I did my calculations correctly, they barely meet code (40 psf Live Load plus 15 psf Dead Load) for a 12’ span. You’ll need to add additional floor joists. Issue #1.5: The ...


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First those original beams have 2x the strength of anything you can purchase today! So explain how they did not meet code. I have remodeled many pre 1930 homes in the PNW and if you do not have rot or pest damage those old 2x are fine. They will have many more growth rings and be close to clear. The ring count was removed from the books decades back today a ...


1

Typically what is done is the main roof is left intact and the shed roof rafters are set to a ledger that is set on top of the main rafters. That will mean a long angled cut on the shed roof rafter which, according to your drawing, by the time the angled cut it set to the ledgers the bottom corner so to speak of the shed roof rafters will be very close to ...


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Yes they appear to be. The two on the right looks like they are holding a 2X to the underside of the roof rafters. I was brought up in the trade calling this a "strongback". The closest one has a notch around the strongback which strongly suggests a structural connection. The picture does not show clearly the far side to tell if it is notched as well.


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