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1

No, you have to follow manufacturer’s recommendations for fall. And by the way, fall is discussed as a ratio of rise/run. Nobody uses degrees for that; it’s an unwieldy unit that you have to keep converting in/out of. Build some roofs; you’ll get it. The reason for the fall is simply that an EPDM roof is a membrane. It is glued and sealed, and it could ...


2

Attaching joists (2x8 for example) to bigger beams (4x12) so that the bottom of the joist is flush with the bottom of the beam is done all the time. Here's one I did for an indoor project- Should not be any different for your roof deck. Just make sure you use the right fasteners for outdoor use.


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Just match the existing fall, it is way too difficult to put a window in with a different slope. Possible but what would be the benefits in this situation.


2

Joist hangers are used all the time to fix joists to the side face of the beam. I see no particular reason that you wouldn't be able to hang the joists even with the bottom of the beam using standard joist hangers like these: Picture Source In fact ceiling joists may very well be hung with similar brackets like these where the ceiling height is set to be at ...


2

Yes, water on the roof will help cool it. Cooling with liquid water running off from a sprinkler is not efficient, but evaporative cooling from a small amount of water (like a periodic sprinkle) is very efficient. 1 gallon of water consumes 8000 BTU as it evaporates. If you spread 1 gallon of water on the roof once an hour and it evaporates you've made the ...


1

Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions. One of the largest roofing companies is Johns Mansfield (JM). There’s many considerations including attachment to roof structure, splicing, fitting around vents, conduit, etc. If you use their accessories, fasteners, etc. it’s more likely that the system will be weathertight. Here’s their product ...


2

A major benefit of a grass/turf or otherwise "green plants" or "living" roof is that you don't have the heat of a typical roof in the sunshine. Storm Water management is an additional benefit to the municipality. Both can result in significant financial incentives/tax breaks as a result. "Needing to remove it when you move" ...


0

My personal experience would suggest that "it's advisable" though it's not specific to "a sliding door" particularly - I have a (slightly taller than average) 2-story building with generous roof overhangs (2 feet, or about 600mm) and I have found that I want "small roofs right over doorways" due to rain blowing sideways far ...


1

I know that in the USA sliding glass doors can leak if directly exposed to rain, which can be windblown.


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No, you can’t change the framing from beams at 4’ on center to trusses 4’ on center, because you’ll overload the exterior wall footings. Currently, one-half the roof load is supported by the center beam and footings with one- fourth the roof load transferred to the exterior walls and footings. By changing to trusses, you’ll transfer one-half the roof load to ...


0

One purpose of those block may be to extend the mounting point for the gutter. Look at how the gutter is attached to those block and where the fascia lower edge is in relationship to the gutter. the original installer may have wanted to install the gutter lower (current position) but did not have enough fascia on the lower edge to provide a solid mounting ...


5

Tile roofs can last anywhere from 35 to 50 years, depending on the roofing material installed under the tile. Cracked tile often happen from people walking on them during pressure cleaning or gutter cleaning. Some cracked tiles could even be from the initial installation as inspectors don't usually inspect each tile. There are special adhesives designed to ...


2

Ask the owner to fix the cracked tiles by settlement date. Tiles crack, it is just a part of the maintenance. My house also has tiles and one cracked during a heavy hail. Make sure you check your roof at least once a year or after storm/hail etc.


2

What you have sounds very much like what we Americans would call a 2" x 8" (nominal size, actual size: 1.5" x 7.5" - yeah, we're weird that way...). What you're proposing is making a 4" x 8" (70x190mm) out of it by nailing the two pieces together. That's not only perfectly acceptable, it's very commonly done for use as a header over a door or window*. ...


1

good you're joining the wide sides togher to make a wider rafter, not joining the thin sides to make a taller one. joined they will be about as strong as the wider one. possibly even stronger, because the laminated beam will not have any flaws like knots that pass through the whole thickness. "nail lamination" is a thing, it should be covered in your ...


1

Generally not recommended. Trusses are not engineered to carry additional weight on their bottom chords. There are "storage" trusses that can be specified when the house is built that will be able to carry the additional load.


1

My answer would be no you cannot. It may depend on your location, maybe not, but a metal roof will allow condensation to form on the underside and that will allow other things to grow like mildew, from the existing growth you have, or keep the other alive too. You will need to clear the old roofing material and lay a condensation barrier down to keep the ...


0

Out of the diffusion membrane I have cut out a box-like detail, with three short flaps on the left, right, and top edges, and a long one at the bottom. The left and right flaps I glued to the rafters, the top one to the diffusion membrane that separates thermal insulation from the ventilation gap, and the bottom flap to the top of the wall in such a way as ...


2

No, it’s not normal for the edges to be loose. Poly glass is a self sealing modified bitumen roofing product. See here: http://www.polyglass.com/public/COM/products/POLYFRESKO_G_SA.pdf As you can see in Item #6 of the installation instructions, the seams are to be lapped 6” and side lapped 4”. I think it’s installed correctly. If there are loose ...


1

The rafters form a plenum that runs over living space AND extends over the walls to the outside, outside the thermal envelope? If so, I imagine that you are trying to extend the thermal break that the wall creates through this plenum? If so, you can roll up fiberglass insulation, place in a plastic bag, then push into place right above the wall, where the ...


2

There's a huge difference in my head between "plugged up" and "capped". "Plugged up" means unintentionally clogged with debris, bird's nests, etc., while "capped" means someone went to the effort to put the appropriate (or at least a) cap on the pipe. These do appear to be "capped" which means someone was intentional about it. Is it "common"? Yes, when you ...


2

yes, that's odd. However, while they are copper pipe usually used for water lines, their location (outside, 'roof' area, stairway on other side indicating no ability to place a water related item there) suggest to me that they have another purpose. I believe that these were ad-hock brackets to provide attachment and support of some object. My first guess ...


1

That material looks very similar to what I used to cure a condensation problem with my air ducts. I live in a humid area and the attic is not insulated from the outside. So using the a/c would cause condensation to form on the ductwork and drip on the drywall below. Your situation sounds similar. If you line the metal roof with that material, it should ...


2

Mold is unlikely from a one-time water infiltration event. That is, unless the inside environment is exceptionally damp and prevents the water from drying out. Generally mold happens when there is a long term issue with water or moisture.


1

Laying down a roof starts from the bottom and goes toward the peak. Trying to repair something like the drip edge or lowest run of shingles is almost never going to give a good result without starting over. If you need to replace the fascia board, you mentioned rotting, usually also involves stripping the roof, especially when there is an existing metal ...


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