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1

Probably. I wouldn't do that. Modern fiberglass shingles are fairly thin compared to the organic (paper) mat ones of the old days, and you will likely see the bulges after a few hot days. The manufacturer probably only recommends using cap staples under the assumption that it will sit exposed for some period of time and needs to hold up to the wind. It's ...


5

OK it's not made of galvanized steel, it's sheathed in galvanized steel. That sheathing is paper-thin and provides no structural value whatsoever. Seriously, ask your engineer how it would affect snow loads if you removed the sheathing and made it a carport. The engineer will say "Not at all, side sheathing provides no strength". It's a liability for wind ...


5

In Florida, I have seen many sheds like the one in your picture further supported with cable or strap tie downs. Heavy galvanized eye bolts embedded in each side of the concrete slab. Then straps or cables attached to one eye bolt, up and over the roof and down to an eye bolt on the opposite side. Hope this helps, and hope you never need it. You can get ...


1

Don't use carpet. Water will go right through that. Buy a tarp with metal rings, and use rachet straps or ropes to fasten that to the base of the shed. Example: https://youtu.be/2X6qlhyKSjM Hardware stores and home improvement stores sell tarps. Walmart even sells them.


0

There are several "rubber" roof materials for flat roofs; neoprene, EDPM, butyl, TPO, etc. Search "rubber roof" on the net for your location to find out what is available , what is needed for your UV, temperature, etc , and what is required for installation. I have EDPM pond liner; small parts of it have been exposed to weather for 20+ years and seem to be "...


0

It looks as though this thing was built out of scraps pieced together. There is just no way this is ever going to be sound the way it is. I think your best course of action is to build some temporary supports to keep the roof from collapsing, pull out the substandard rafters and rebuild using correctly sized lumber, supported properly. If you're in ...


2

This is definitely a 3-bearing truss and it requires the support point in the middle. The reason I can see that is because a two point truss is going to have a lot of tension in the lower chord. The lower chord needs to be a continuous tie from one outer bearing point to the other outer bearing point to hold the walls from pushing outward. At the ...


0

Never drill holes or saw soffits as they could have asbestos in them.


1

It depends. There’s several issues: 1) deck thickness, 2) metal panel width, 3) wind loading, 4) slope of roof You’ll want to follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions, but here are generally acceptable standards. 1) Most manufacturers recommend penetrating the roof deck, unless it’s 2x material (1 1/2” thick). Therefore, 1/2” plywood deck could ...


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