New answers tagged

2

It depends on: The specs for the unit. Some require an air gap and typically have metal protrusions to enforce that spec. Older ones may have called specifically for fire-resistant wall treatments. Local building codes. There may be requirements that disregard and enhance manufacturer requirements and recommendations. The risk tolerance of the builder or ...


0

You have to notch your roof rafters (birdsmouth) at the bottom and at the top so that the rafters can sit on the plates. You'll then nail from each side to secure it to wall plates. Familyhandyman has a diagram on what this is. For the jack studs, you'll need a top and bottom plate for it so you can nail/screw the bottom plate to the top plate of the ...


0

There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel. One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped. If it's ...


0

You could install MDF panels in a “zigzag” pattern without using studs. Install each panel at a 90 degree angle to the previous panel for support. They could be “glued and screwed” together and support each other. Btw, a side benefit to a music room will be the zigzag walls that will help “break up” the sound waves and be better acoustically.


0

There are many ways to build what you're proposing, but the one that jumped to mind first is akin to a panel/frame assembly. Start with a post (~1.5"x3.5"/ ~38mm x 88mm, or larger), firmly attached to the floor and ceiling. This could be a bracket that wraps around the post, it could be a bolt at one end that mates with a hole, or it could be a couple of L ...


1

You'd need 3 ply 2x10 SPF at 16" on center spacing to span 21' with only floor load on the middle 12' of the span. If there is any roof load on these joists then that completely changes everything.


2

I think you need to trim the 2x4 studs in the opening and build a header over the whole new opening, like the header that was over the original doorway, which will extend across your new opening. Something like this: (hopefully you're better at it than I am with Photoshop...) Taking care to attach to existing studs on the right side and adding a jack stud ...


2

Another option would be to use carriage bolts on both sides of where the eye hooks are going in. Glue the boards together with construction adhesive. Use 4 bolts, two on each side of the eye hooks, top and bottom. Use 3/8" bolts, ( or 1/2" ) large washers and nuts. Personally i would just glue the boards together with construction adhesive and screw them ...


0

Instead of screw into the seam You can use a bolt through the seam and use a washer+metal plate on the other side to spread the load.


0

You can go two ways with it. You can purchase a 4X6 or possibly a 3X6 and have it ripped to the 1 3/4" thickness you need, presuming the original is close to 5-6" wide. Or you could get the standard 2X6 and use non shrink grout to tuck under the plate after it is shimmed up in places to allow the grout to go in the areas that are the most important, under ...


4

You could use a pair of large clamps close to and flanking the screwhole to prevent the screws from pushing the plies apart. Once the screw is in at full depth the clamp is removed. It might take four clamps--from both edges of the beam. Also you might want to use wax or other appropriate lubricant on the screws and be careful to avoid making the "pilot" ...


0

When I renovated my bathroom I screwed vertical blocks of wood approx. 8" long to the sides of the vertical studs the thickness of some plywood back from the face e.g. 3/4". I then screwed 3/4" plywood to the vertical supports between the studs. This means you can have an 8" high piece of plywood to allow for any miscalculations vertically. I used wood ...


5

No, there isn't unless ADA is involved. You should have a copy of your drawings that you can mark up with backing, electrical preferences, and any other concerns. Its entirely up to you, so you should schedule a walk-through specific to that, and another specific to electrical (fixture and device locations). Make estimations at height based on your ...


5

The information I have seen is that the ADA recommendations for grab bars in bath and shower are placement 33" to 36" above the floor of the shower or tub. So the expected height of the shower floor or tub must be added when placing blocking during framing. Be sure the blocking is in the plane of the studs so it does not interfere with drywall placement. ...


0

The “load” on the opening is calculated by adding the Code required Live Load (40 lbs. per square foot) to the Dead Load (10 lbs. per square foot) for a Total Load of 50 lbs. per square foot. The first adjacent load bearing wall is 12’ away, so half the load transfers to it and half to the new opening. Therefore, the load is 6’ x 50 psf = 300 lbs. per ...


0

Put the furring strips on the top and bottom so you have something to nail the sheetrock to otherwise it is going to warp, it cannot span 4 feet with no support.


2

A pair of 32" doors should fit easily. Any slop at the siding can be trimmed out with a piece that covers the existing siding. Go to a real door place. They'll be able to give you a reasonable price for what you want/need. And if you need a deeper jamb for the aforementioned overlap strategy, they're equipped to deal with that. I've hated every big box ...


Top 50 recent answers are included