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2

Those joists carry dead/live loads of the closet floor, any walls resting on it and that transfer loads, foot of any attic stairs etc.. There is also a load transferring from the studs you mention via a bottom plate (not visible) onto the joists. If you remove the joists during work, you have to support the flooring and bottom plate that rests on the joists. ...


2

When talking about structural issues it's always important to work to the rules. Like electricity, this is something that can kill when it's done wrong. If you're worried about a beam, the first thing to do is to figure out how big it should be. You've told us the rafters are 10 feet between the ledger and beam, 16"OC, and your beams span about 4 feet ...


4

borrow or rent a nail gun. they shoot so fast that noting will move.


8

How about drilling holes and using bolts, washers and nuts? This will be structurally stronger than a million nails driven in from both sides.


0

This is fine as long as you maintain clearspace There is nothing wrong with framing a non-structural "bump out" to house a flushmount panel as long as you don't introduce foreign (i.e. non-electrical, such as HVAC or plumbing) systems directly above the panel or create a situation that violates the 30" by 36" (fridge sized) clearspace ...


1

I suspect the loading on the new “flush beam” is more than the 2700 lbs. outlined in the question. I calculated 2800 lbs. and that’s without the weight of the upper wall resting on the new beam. (However, I think that would be about 250 lbs. per linear foot on the new beam.) Depending on the species and grade, a new 4x10 beam 20’ long can support about 2800 ...


1

On our jobs, the concrete guys never got the concrete perfect. Since we were setting the bottom plates in non shrink mud, they did not have to and the "higher ups" allowed the concrete guys to do this. Never the less, after the walls were poured, we would drill the plates, countersink the area where the bolts were if needed, wetted the top of the ...


3

Concrete that's "fixed" like this is sure to begin crumbling right after the contractor moves out of state. I'd be dissatisfied with this. As far as I'm concerned this is a breach of contract and is the contractor's responsibility, even as far as removing the entire thing and doing it over. That's out of scope for this site, though. The only fix I'...


1

If you want it to be precisely level, you can use a transit level or laser level to set clamped concrete forms similar to the ones in your second photo to the correct height. If you can't rent or buy a $2000 daytime visible laser level, get a cheaper indoor one and use it at dawn or dusk. Mine is a non rotary that cost me $40 second hand and would be fine ...


-3

IMO, theoretically, a well-jointed splice is as good as the joist without a splice. However, the stresses in the wood and fasteners will complicate the issue due to offsetting the splice on the support beam, at which the internal stresses (shear and moment) of the joists are very high, and each joist will have different internal stresses that are difficult ...


4

As long as both joist go over the beam your are fine. Remember if it bothers you you could always cut one of the joist so it was equidistant over the joist but its total unnecessary.


2

You should get a permit to do this and the permitting authority will tell you what you can and cannot do. Even if the structure is sound and up to code as a carport, if you fill in walls this would change the wind loading. Contact building inspection.


0

As the wall you're building is not structural notching is an acceptable solution. An alternative would be to use scraps of thin (eg 1/2") wood as spacers to separate the top plate and the studs from the existing structure. I like engineered wood like MDF, OSB, and plywood for this because it doesn't split when you nail through it.


2

This is what you'll want to do (making allowances for your particular dimensions and geometry): ...and it's just my (unsolicited) two cents, but you might consider putting the door closer to the corner (at the left in your photo, where the ladder is) so that people wouldn't walk into the bathroom and directly into the toilet. (I don't seem to be able to ...


2

The strategy of adding a header to replace one or more studs is appropriate, with one caveat: The header must be adequate to carry the load of the floor above as well as any roof that's bearing at that point, if those currently rest on that wall. The header must rest on "trimmer" studs, which aren't shown in your diagram, whether it's load-bearing ...


2

I had inspector come and looked into this issue. He was also not sure why it was happened like that way. He suggested to replace those two studs with new 2 studs. those two studs are just a waste right now as those are not attached to the top plate, also one of the stud is pretty old. thanks


3

@Jon, @Freeman, and @ThreePhaseEEl, thank you for your comments. So the conclusion was that stainless steel is fine as long as the junction between the galvanised steel and stainless is inside the building envelope which ensures that there is never enough moisture to cause galvanic corrosion. Galvanised fasteners are NOT allowed to be exposed externally for ...


0

Your roof seems going through some movement, the reason, or the reasons, can't be pinpointed through a few pictures. You shall go back to the original consultant engineer, who I assume was overseeing and responsible for the jacking operation occurred a short while ago. The structure may not under immediate threat of collapsing, but it is prudent to find out ...


0

You shall provide the vertical supports as close as practical to shorten the overhanging length of the bottom ties. You should consider to provide braces in both directions (the sketches showing brace in one direction only) to better stabilize the supports. Do not forget to provide adequate safety factor in load calculations.


0

My thought would be to use concrete blocks under each joist a few inches back from the edge on the low side. From what you say it sounds like you might benefit from a step that would hide the blocks anyway.


0

You don't mention anything about the foundation. Unfortunately that's likely to be the most painful part of this project. When you put a deck like this on top of a patio you are essentially putting all the weight that was evenly spread out over the patio on the 8 points supporting your posts. Unless the patio is very thick there is a danger that you could ...


0

This wall is illegal for two reasons: 1) exceeds maximum height allowed by code, and 2) too narrow for minimum insulation required by code. The maximum height allowed by code is 10’ without lateral bracing or without structural analysis that accompany the drawings. (See ICC Table R602.3(5) ) The Energy Code requires a 2x6 stud in order to provide adequate ...


1

If the wall is rectangular and not trapezoidal, it is typically built on the floor (trapezoidal is too, but a slightly different process). The header for the window is either sized by the engineer or it will be listed in the code book. When the wall is finished assembled is is taken to the layout line on the floor where it is to be permanently located and ...


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