New answers tagged

2

Your Option 2 is still not going to be a really great solution. If you are going to lay the new rafters on top of the existing rafters and existing roof sheathing you will need to taper the upper rafters as shown below. This way there can be a smooth transition of the roofing materials from the existing roof down onto the new extension rafters. Ideally the ...


1

You have several issues: 1) seismic or high wind area where you live, 2) loads on wall, 3) wall finish 1) If you live in a seismically active area or a high wind area you’ll want to take special care by using steel clips like a Simpson A34 clip top and bottom. (However, your house has been there long enough without damage, it probably doesn’t matter.) 2) ...


1

I don’t have any pictures but all of my house is steel and cement new house built on water in ma about 21,000 gsf 14,000 living 7,000 per level the basement is 10ft High with the foundation on re enforced cinder block. Basement has larger steel I beams supporting lighter steel framing. The first floor, floor is 6 inch steel decking with 2inch of concrete ...


2

In case someone finds this question later, MiTek (who makes USP hangers and ties, similar to Simpson), has a technical bulletin illustrating the screw placement and minimum clearances for different 2x dimensions when attaching a ledger board to studs, with or without gypsum board:


2

Each truss manufacturer have specific requirements for drilling holes in their joists. You’ll need to verify the JOIST TYPE (structural type based on flange size, species, etc.) and SPAN with the manufacturer and then determine where they allow holes. However, here is an installation guide https://www.bc.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/UK_Install_Guide_A2....


2

Why it was done? Because the designer wanted the wall in one place upstairs and another place downstairs. Is this legit? I can't answer whether it was to code when first built, or whether it is still to code, but I am pretty sure it is safe. Essentially the first floor wall is being supported by a cantilevered beam projecting out from the ground floor ...


2

I would use something wider than a 1x6 - why not? Even if the mounting plate is smaller, the wider board will be easier to hit, and will be stronger. If yellow pine or douglas fir are available they are a lot stronger than white pine. I don't trust toe-nail attachments with skinny boards. The old school way to do it would to be notch the studs so the ...


0

Is there some trick to nailing up furring strips to keep them from cracking on you? SKL has hit the nail on the tail, dull the tip first. That technique reduces splitting of all types of lumber. Keep your fasteners away from the ends of the boards. Pre-drilling the holes would typically prevent splitting, but not so much with concrete nails. When the nail ...


0

You must consult the manual for the insert you are planning to use, it will specify the required clearances to combustibles.


1

A 1x6 will work and I have seen plenty done this way especially older homes. You have to consider that on top of the 1x6 will be green board or cement backer board depending on the finish and possibly tile, all that will add strength. I have also seen marine plywood used as a support. By the way that's a mighty heavy bathroom sink even if it was cast iron.


1

My thought is have the stud flush with the concrete wall. Then use pine wood to create a box from the edge of the window frame to the finished drywall edge. Then put the trim on the drywall to frame it. Creates a window box ledge for fancy stuff to sit on.


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It depends on the gas insert. Many gas inserts are listed for contact so if it is your contractor would be correct. I don’t think the contractor would try and cheep out on this because a fire would be on his bond if he did not do it properly.


0

I think you are fine. Predrill the holes because its dry wood. The frame is for sure connected to the studs even if the frame does not connect to the ceiling.


0

I believe you will want to attach 1.5" thick material to the sill plate and have that come out to the top of your knee wall. If you do not do this you will have a dickens of a time trying to adequately attach the reclaimed lumber in a secure manner to prevent it from cupping and warping over time. With regard to the windows...why not just use a separate ...


1

On a scale of 1-10 (10 being highest concern, I’d rate this a 2. Based on the location of the joists, size and age of the joists and lack of bearing partitions above I would not worry about these failing. If you want to be done with this concern with the least investment of energy the simplest solution would be to support the joist pair with a post. Run a ...


1

I've heard that I can glue/screw a 2x4 to the bottom of this joist to make it an upside down T shape. Will this restore enough tensile strength? Otherwise, does this need to be fully-sistered (with the pipe relocated)? How urgent is this repair? It's not urgent. You think your notch is problematic? Look at this guy's project! I've seen entire ...


2

Three feet doesn't sound like much, but for a high-stress beam it is. You'll probably need to convert from solid wood to LVL or steel at a prescribed size. As you say, most of the weight of the home is on the block foundation. That still leaves a few tons on the beam, and you don't guess with that kind of load. The larger problem, though, is that you may ...


12

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


5

You’re lucky, sort of... First, the joists are 1 5/8” x 7 1/2” not 1 1/2” x 7 1/4” if the house was built in the 1940’s. Second, the joists are not Redwood (thank goodness) they’re Douglas fir. Third, I’d classify them as No. 1 or Select Structural grade. (There’s only one grade better: Dense Select Structural.) Fourth, those hairline horizontal lines ...


5

These are larger than 2x6 joists. That plays in your favor. A notch in a 2x6 is disastrous. The beams look OK for now. The cracks are horizontal so they're not concerning. Those can be caused by the drying of the boards or settling, and they could predate the notches. Your best bet is to reroute the pipes and full sister the beam . It has the least ...


0

If you look at the left side I can see that the joist is spliced there so I would say no you cannot move the beam--this is holding the floor up and I’d probably a load bearing wall. It's not only for the floor but for the ceiling for the main floor also. Added looking at the beam directly over the jack or post there are 2 pieces there again an engineer would ...


0

Question #1: The height for an "open feel" is a personal aesthetic choice. I had the same desire for a cabin porch, and went with a shed roof sloping down to about 8 1/2 ft. I'm very pleased with the outcome and get regular comments about the airy feeling in the porch. I strapped 6x10 beams down to 6x6 posts. But I didn't have any corners to deal with. ...


0

It looks like the original ledger was doing its job - the floor joists were staying up with the doubled header. The Simpson hangers were not an appropriate application. The notched joists' ends made it impossible to place the hangers per the manufacture's specifications. I doubt that the hangers will compensate for the loss of the ledger. There will ...


0

All those joist have to be replaced. Any joist requires inch an half bearing minimum. 3” for a beam. You got like 3/8” actually on the joist hanger and those do like there too small a hanger. When you have those joists off replace that cracked ply on the lintel. You’ll to put in a temp support wall as was mentioned earlier in this thread. What you have in ...


2

Yes, the “clear opening” is the horizontal distance from support to support. (We often call this the clear span.) In your case, the clear opening is about 14 feet. In fact, the clear span is the horizontal distance from FACE of support to FACE of support. It doesn’t matter the length of the member or if it’s a 4:12 pitch or a 12:12 pitch.


0

You could cut lumber to float in the space between the pipes and secure it inside the wall with sheet metal. There could be several variations on the idea, but here is one. Cut a piece of plywood to a width that fits between the copper and the plastic pipes with whatever height you prefer. Mount two metal strips to the studs on either side of the cavity ...


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