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18

you should angle the post that's by the house. It will increase the functionality of the gate hardware. If you're worried about looks, you can always take a piece of fence plank and install it from the post corner over to the house wall.


15

Standard engineering advice for "flat" exterior surfaces is that they actually be sloped at 1/8" per foot (which is close enough to 1cm/meter as to make either perfectly acceptable) for drainage purposes, rather than be "dead flat." Method is to make the base that shape, using anything from laser levels to stakes and strings. The base needs also to be ...


14

Great question. Adding this addition requires a really good, deep, compacted base. I would isolate it from the building by 1/2 inch, but if the base is good, rebar to the existing pad will help stop any displacement. You have to expect some settling, but the better the base, the smaller the amount. Web rebar won't help much, but 3/8 or 1/2 inch bar will hold ...


10

I had a similar issue but a small angle so it wasn't worth bothering to fix it. I think you definitely have to go with the second orientation. (square up the gate opening) Are you using 4x4 or 6x6 posts? Maybe get a 4x8 or 6x12 post for the house side. Then cut a complimentary angle to the house so that you don't have just a point touching your house. ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


8

Don't do that! You will never get the frame aligned properly in the opening if you take the doors out. If you can't handle the door yourself, get someone to help. To elaborate a bit more. The doors in the frame provide 3-dimensional stability to the frame. Then you take them out the frame will distort in nearly all possible ways. You will never be able ...


8

Something that might be an alternative option: don't use square gate posts, but triangular ones, or octagonal ones or whatever shape you need to get the angle right.


7

Your local home center(Lowes/HomeDepot) should have 12inch x 12inch concrete patio blocks for about $2 each, even less if you find some with chipped corners. Since it is a short term project I would just lay them on the dirt following the original line. The blocks should spread the load enough that they won't sink too deep into the mud. When it's time to ...


6

What you need to know is the rough opening size. This is the dimensions between the vertical studs and the horizontal dimension from the floor to the bottom of the header. You may have to remove some trim to see these components. If you are going to have a contractor install the new door, have that person give you the proper measurements for the replacement ...


6

FWIW, that's technically called a "raised patio" rather than a deck. At 40' long, your challenge will be to prevent cracking...so I'd count on putting in expansion joints. If you want to ensure a solid base, you need to use crushed rock and add it layer-by-layer mechanically compacting each layer before adding the next. That's going to be some work to get ...


6

In my opinion (not AHJ). You don't need a GFCI on receptacles that: 1. Cannot be reached without the use of special equipment. 2. Are being used for a specific duty. However, the receptacle shown is in a damp location and the cover that is on it not rated as such. It needs to be changed out with a weatherproof cover. If anyone is questioning why it is a ...


5

No that is not true at all. Maybe your contractor was thinking of mortar but a) no contractor should be confusing those and b) even if you used mortar, it'd still be repairable (albeit with a bit more work).


5

If you have plenty of time, and don't want to hire power tools, you can do it a bit at a time over several weeks (months?). It will be hard work but anyone can do it. That's a brick bolster and a club hammer, which is what I had to hand when I needed to break up some brickwork. You could try some other type of cold chisel or hammer. It depends what you can ...


5

Via a Luxembourg regular visitor on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/Luxembourg/comments/50cxwq/can_a_luxembourg_resident_answer_this/d73vb3y These receptacles are build right next to the entrance-way, need little space and as they are built into the ground you can easily hide the ugly trashbin with hedges and bushes around them. This simply seems to be ...


5

My recommendation is to not put in the patio. Your efforts may lower the value to the buyer rather than raising it, especially if what you're planning to put in is the "easiest, lowest cost patio" rather than a landscaping masterpiece. Like many kinds of projects, you will almost never get a financial return from the work and investment unless: you ...


5

Solution 1: After a week of curing the base layer, add a second layer 3/4-inch thick of the same concrete mix. Start by setting 1 x 4 forms level with the intended grade. Prepare the surface by cleaning and wetting it, then brushing on a slurry of the mix material laced with DAP bonding additive. Then mix one bag at a time using a 9-gallon mixing tub and a ...


4

No tips other than doing it properly. Otherwise the pavers will be all wonky and wavy within 1-2 years in most cases. You could try digging down the height of paver, compacting a little, putting pavers in and fill cracks with dirt and planting grass in the cracks. No guarantees from me on the result over time though. Chance of this working out would ...


4

If you have no space in a garage or shed (like me) then outside is your only option. I use a 20'x20' plastic tarp tied around my four patio chairs and table on my deck. They've survived 6 Minnesota winters. After a big snowfall, sometimes I'll sweep the snow off if it accumulates.


4

Simple floor scrapers like this one, pictured below have always done the job for me - they will take pretty much anything off a flat surface including splashed concrete.


4

It can't go over without a pump of some sort (even a siphon needs energy input to start it), so if you want a passive solution it has to go through, by installing some sort of drainage pipe through that wall. Maybe more than one. Yes, this may require disassembling and reassembling the top few courses of the wall, unless you want to try drilling through a ...


4

It sounds to me like a restriction at the regulator, not the control valve. You mentioned that the previous owner had done some work on it, make sure that he/she did not replace the regulator with one that does not deliver the design flow/pressure. In this case, adequate flow/pressure depends on proper regulator back pressure setting (they are rated in "...


4

I'm from Luxembourg and have never seen such a hole to put the dustbins in. We usually store them somewhere in or around the house, and put them out on the curb. It definitely seems to be isolated to a specific house / street / neighbourhood. The bin itself is regulated of course and contains a chip that holds the owners information.


4

I don’t know where that porch roof is at, what laws govern electrical work there if any or whether that receptacle was inspected and approved by an authority of jurisdiction when it was installed. But you seem to be concerned that it’s not GFCI protected and I would too. Even if you have electrical laws where you live, it’s a minimum requirement and you are ...


4

You can remove the active door to help with transporting it on site, but often the inactive door is permanently fixed and not easily removable. If it is easily removable for some reason, then sure go for it. Caulk the threshold, insert the frame, and then reinstall both active and inactive doors before going any further in the installation. Using temporary ...


3

Nobody can really tell for sure what will work but you - we haven't got your particular glue handy to test. Pressure washer is a good bet. You have it, so try it. If at first it doesn't succeed, try a narrower nozzle. A wire brush might also work. If the glue is brittle, a silicon carbide grinding block may work - or you might rent a terrazzo-grinding ...


3

The drawbacks of not using a proper base is that, over time, the pavers will sink and become completely uneven. If it's mainly a cost issue, I don't know if any real alternative that would be cheaper. If you stick with your plan, I'd consider going with crushed rock for your compacted base (you can't really compact sand) and then put a 1" sand layer on ...


3

The sliding doors in our sunrooms and living rooms are all 80 inches in height 72 inches wide. Sliding doors are usually either 60 inch in width if they are 5 foot wide. If it’s 6 foot wide, it measures up to 72 inches. The height is usually 80 inches, though it may vary from one manufacturer to another. If you want to measure it, remove the wood trim first. ...


3

What you want is something like this: Get some Red-Heads or other appropriate concrete bolt and fasten it down. Slip the 4x4 in and tighten it up. Ideally, you should still have some posts properly embedded in the ground to help support the torque caused by someone leaning on the fence, but you can use these in between.


3

I have encountered a similar situation in a house I am buying for my elderly parents. The house has a concrete pad up against the house that connects to the asphalt driveway and has no slope. The adjacent basement wall is bowed 3". A licensed foundation expert indicated the hydro-static pressure caused the wall to bow. He recommended the concrete be ...


3

In a way it does. It's a lot like Rain-X makes water bead up on glass, masonry sealant will make the water tend to bead up and run off of brick and concrete. However, much like Rain-X, it wears out every once in a while -- probably more often in the PNW where it'll get wet all the time. The moss grows because there's easy moisture to be found within and on ...


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