Hot answers tagged

34

I've done it two ways. Take a coat hanger and bend a 1" 90 degree at the end of a straightened out hanger. Insert the bent edge down into the seem and twist the hanger so the 1" piece turns under the paver you want to pull up. work it back and forth with a screwdriver in the opposite edge while pulling the paver up. My other trick was to drill a ...


23

Using a crowbar or screwdriver etc. lift the pavers to the left of the sunken ones first. Lift the ones numbered 1 and 2 in the image: Then you should have enough room to dig out the sunken ones.


19

I would only drill that stone as an absolute last resort. That not only damages it in an unrecoverable way but opens it up to faster degradation from weather, especially if you're in a frost zone. Get some aluminum wire for bonsai (example). It's anodized in a suitable color and very easy to work with. You could also use coated steel gardening wire (per ...


19

I've recently seen a video but can't find the link. Consider a Flexible Joint Knife, or the equivalent in a fairly wide spatula. Get a pair of them, to enable uniform lifting. Slice from each edge of the spatula about one-third of the way inward, about an inch or two from the bottom. Bend those cut tabs in the same direction. As you force the tool into the ...


18

you should angle the post that's by the house. It will increase the functionality of the gate hardware. If you're worried about looks, you can always take a piece of fence plank and install it from the post corner over to the house wall.


15

Standard engineering advice for "flat" exterior surfaces is that they actually be sloped at 1/8" per foot (which is close enough to 1cm/meter as to make either perfectly acceptable) for drainage purposes, rather than be "dead flat." Method is to make the base that shape, using anything from laser levels to stakes and strings. The base needs also to be ...


14

Try using a pressure washer and a wet/dry vac to erode the sand and debris in the gap between the pavers. That'll hopefully get you to a place where at least the paver block can wobble freely, which will ease lifting it up. For lifting.. if you're lucky, and/or have a sufficiently large vacuum, the paver might be lifted by vacuum alone. A ring of clay or ...


13

Just to add to the various hints, and complete the picture of available techniques, professionals who do this a lot would use a vacuum slab lifter, something like this: Source: Express Tools However your surface area may be too small for this, but even smaller attachments are made for bespoke situations. A bit much of a purchase for a one-off, but worthy of ...


11

For brick driveways the most important part is a solid compacted base--crushed quarry rock or shale, not crushed river rock. Sand is normally used, not mortar. For a “green” drive, place the holes vertical and fill with dirt and then grass seed. I have done this and if kept moist with drought resistant grass it works well (but I live in the grass dead ...


10

I had a similar issue but a small angle so it wasn't worth bothering to fix it. I think you definitely have to go with the second orientation. (square up the gate opening) Are you using 4x4 or 6x6 posts? Maybe get a 4x8 or 6x12 post for the house side. Then cut a complimentary angle to the house so that you don't have just a point touching your house. ...


10

Out of square doors/door frames either do not close (if really bad) or seal properly; a 1/4" can create a significant gap in between the door and weather stripping allowing significant heat/AC loss. Out of plumb doors either open or close from gravity which is simply annoying.


10

If you were pouring a slab over this -- and required decades of stability -- you might need to worry about your fill. Organic matter and other debris that will break down over time is appropriate for topsoil but not for fill. Your project is going to be less sensitive to settling. You should compact your fill well as you place it. It looks like you have ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


8

Don't do that! You will never get the frame aligned properly in the opening if you take the doors out. If you can't handle the door yourself, get someone to help. To elaborate a bit more. The doors in the frame provide 3-dimensional stability to the frame. Then you take them out the frame will distort in nearly all possible ways. You will never be able ...


8

Something that might be an alternative option: don't use square gate posts, but triangular ones, or octagonal ones or whatever shape you need to get the angle right.


8

Doors are made in rectangular shapes with nice right angle corners. When the door's frame sides are plumb and the top and bottom are level that defines a rectangular shape of the frame. Having both door and frame rectangular ensures that the two will fit properly with even margins.


8

I am going to say they can... but no. There are tons of varieties of bricks that are used for pavers. There is no reason to go with your garden variety house brick. To be clear the OP is talking about something very similar to below - clay cored brick. Take a good look at this brick - as this is a pretty smooth example. Do you want to walk on ...


7

Your local home center(Lowes/HomeDepot) should have 12inch x 12inch concrete patio blocks for about $2 each, even less if you find some with chipped corners. Since it is a short term project I would just lay them on the dirt following the original line. The blocks should spread the load enough that they won't sink too deep into the mud. When it's time to ...


6

What you need to know is the rough opening size. This is the dimensions between the vertical studs and the horizontal dimension from the floor to the bottom of the header. You may have to remove some trim to see these components. If you are going to have a contractor install the new door, have that person give you the proper measurements for the replacement ...


6

FWIW, that's technically called a "raised patio" rather than a deck. At 40' long, your challenge will be to prevent cracking...so I'd count on putting in expansion joints. If you want to ensure a solid base, you need to use crushed rock and add it layer-by-layer mechanically compacting each layer before adding the next. That's going to be some work to get ...


6

In my opinion (not AHJ). You don't need a GFCI on receptacles that: 1. Cannot be reached without the use of special equipment. 2. Are being used for a specific duty. However, the receptacle shown is in a damp location and the cover that is on it not rated as such. It needs to be changed out with a weatherproof cover. If anyone is questioning why it is a ...


6

Yes that appears to simply be set on top of a spacer which is then set on top of the buried box. You should be able to lift it off, with some effort, and also keep in mind that some adhesive or mortar might have been used to secure it. It looks like you should be able to remove the spacer under the lid and drop the thing down a few inches to make it flush ...


6

What works for me is using two pruning saws. Place one in the gap on each side of the paver, then twist each one so the teeth grab the paver. Then lift. Easy.


5

No that is not true at all. Maybe your contractor was thinking of mortar but a) no contractor should be confusing those and b) even if you used mortar, it'd still be repairable (albeit with a bit more work).


5

If you have plenty of time, and don't want to hire power tools, you can do it a bit at a time over several weeks (months?). It will be hard work but anyone can do it. That's a brick bolster and a club hammer, which is what I had to hand when I needed to break up some brickwork. You could try some other type of cold chisel or hammer. It depends what you can ...


5

Via a Luxembourg regular visitor on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/Luxembourg/comments/50cxwq/can_a_luxembourg_resident_answer_this/d73vb3y These receptacles are build right next to the entrance-way, need little space and as they are built into the ground you can easily hide the ugly trashbin with hedges and bushes around them. This simply seems to be ...


5

My recommendation is to not put in the patio. Your efforts may lower the value to the buyer rather than raising it, especially if what you're planning to put in is the "easiest, lowest cost patio" rather than a landscaping masterpiece. Like many kinds of projects, you will almost never get a financial return from the work and investment unless: you ...


5

Solution 1: After a week of curing the base layer, add a second layer 3/4-inch thick of the same concrete mix. Start by setting 1 x 4 forms level with the intended grade. Prepare the surface by cleaning and wetting it, then brushing on a slurry of the mix material laced with DAP bonding additive. Then mix one bag at a time using a 9-gallon mixing tub and a ...


5

I assisted with a project like this. Pavers usually have a chamfered edge which is a little easier on bare feet than the sharper corners and edges of bricks but they worked fine. The sand is a really good idea though. In addition to stabilizing the bricks, it will reduce the weed growth between them which means you'll have more time to enjoy the patio.


5

Reflection of radiant heat is what you would be after. If you could magically hang it, one of the best would be a metal surface above the fire reflecting heat back down to everyone. Using an upside down cone or pyramid shape, with the middle point centered over the burner and the angles set so that the surfaces would reflect the fire and heat (radiant heat ...


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