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1

As per answer above , the overhang is very minimal and if done to keep framing square then yes it is fine ,,,In fact it is very common as it is people building these things not precision machinery ( someone could have tripped or concrete pump hose could have hit forms when pouring ) Regardless in all building codes there is a min bearing amount which in ...


2

I'd verify the threshold is level and if it's not note which side is higher. Remove the treated 2x underneath the threshold and check for level again. If the side that's binding is too high tapping it down with a hammer and a wood block on top of the high spot should at least enable the door to shut smoothly. Once the door functions properly you'll need to ...


6

Step 1: Properly size the support lumber What we see there looks like more than just swelling to me. It seems like someone jammed a full-thickness two-by in there out of haste. Swelling was just the final straw that caused rubbing. You'll need to remove it. Use a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) to cut any fasteners running through it, then pry it out. Then flex ...


1

Concrete cracks. The fact that the crack reappeared after a cosmetic repair attempt is no surprise. If the wall was reinforced properly when built I wouldn’t be too concerned but you definitely want to get a structural engineer’s opinion. The only part about it that causes me pause is that it’s so close to an outside corner with a potentially heavy bearing ...


1

The fact that you have water seeping in through the cracks is much more concerning to me than the cracks themselves. I'd start at the outside of the home and find where the water management on the property is not working right. Check your downspouts, check your grading, check especially outside the room that this concrete is in. Solve that problem and you ...


0

The cracks in your photo of the bricks are probably from the foundation settling. There are many reasons for it to settle. Most are due to the surrounding earth getting removed or saturated (soft and compressed). Either leaves the concrete/block unsupported. Due to the immense weight of the structure that area settles away from the supported part. I don't ...


0

Those cracks in the mortar and drywall don't look out of the ordinary and, while the photo of the crawl space is poor, nothing is obviously wrong there. If in doubt, get a structural engineer to inspect the foundation and see if there is any movement that is going to compromise the structure. Otherwise, just repair the damage and be done with it.


1

The answer cannot be determined from a photo. Please consult a structural engineer who can inspect the foundation and determine if it's still suitable for building. Yes, this will cost something but it's going to be far less expensive than building on a unsuitable foundation. It's also likely that the AHJ is going to require that anyway before issuing a ...


1

It seems a sump in the lowest corner with an electric pump would keep water at a minimum . Maybe two sumps . Break /cut through the concrete and put in a cement or even a plastic tub to set the pump into.


1

Building a higher floor inside is not solving the problem of water getting into your shed. Your plan to to level gravel for a cement floor sounds smart and feasible. The gravel under the block would allow water to drain if the existing concrete slab were pitched properly. You did state there was a high point to the floor, but unless that high point is ...


4

I would start by digging a trench and filling with gravel / small stones to direct the water away as much as possible. Did that at the back of my property - started at 6" deep and went to 12" as it needs a small slope. directed the water into an existing drain and it worked a treat. Only took 2 afternoons of digging and measuring the slope. Edit: ...


3

Nails popping up above the surface is a common event and usually isn't cause for alarm. The reason this occurs is from slight movement of the framing members (due to expansion and contraction) that over time works the nail loose. Conversely, if the pops and cracks have appeared in a relatively short period of time, it may be time to search more closely for a ...


2

FWIW, all the cracks look old, There is nothing looking at the crack that it is new. New cracks have their own "look" about them. Perhaps they were just overlooked before. These are typical cracks from settling. About the posts, this is typical of older construction. New construction would have used pressure treated wood to isolate the wood from ...


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