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Other than the suggestions in Freeman's answer - which are good you need to go back to design principles of the doors. One door should have an in inset and this can range in thickness to what you want and need (thicker for insulated or sturdier door). Let's call this door B. The other door should be outset (door A) - in that the backing of the door extends ...


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Without pictures or a description of what you've currently got to make them "airtight", it's hard to make a specific recommendation, but in general, do the same things you do for French doors on your house: Weather stripping all around the openings Weather stripping between the doors Rubber sweeps at the bottom of the doors If the doors weren't ...


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STOP. GFCIs don't just protect the 2 sockets. They can also protect wiring attached to them, and it's generally smart to use that feature to protect downline wiring, so you need fewer GFCI devices. A fault in that wiring will cause the GFCI to trip, and that is working as intended. So you can never condemn a GFCI until you pull it out and disconnect all ...


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There are really only two likely possibilities here: Broken GFCI Repeated trips, dirt, water damage, insects, loose connections leading to arcing - there are a ton of reasons why a complex electronic device like a GFCI can fail. They are designed to fail safe when possible - i.e., off rather than on. If the GFCI has truly failed, the only fix is to replace ...


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Myself, I'd use metal conduit, because conduit bodies can make pretty sharp turns. See this question. Since you're already sure a big metal snake will handle most of your bends, I'd just use FMC (Flexible Metal Conduit) between conduit bodies. In conduit, you run individual wires. This is less stiff (like how a ream of copier paper is less stiff after you ...


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Don’t cut the cladding. Cut an elongated hole long enough to enter and continue on the other side of the wall. Start your cut right after a stud punch the inside hole so the cable will make a lazy Z. Pull the cable through the 2 holes and seal the outside one with a paintable silicone calking. If you want a 90 yes cut the cladding but the problem then is ...


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Yes, the maximum vertical threshold height is 7.75” at a LANDING, if it’s not an accessible unit. That is to say, from the top of the landing to the top of the threshold it can only be 7.75” max. (So, the distance from top of landing to top of floor must be less.) (See ICC 1008.1.6, Exception) The distance could be zero, so your requested 4” is acceptable. ...


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It looks like the jamb is pulling away from the jamb extension at the top of the door. I don't think this is water related. You have a decent overhang and you have a metal jamb flashing header. If I had to guess I'd say your jamb wasn't secured at the top and someone kicked/bumped/rammed it and the jamb was pushed inside displacing the interior trim and ...


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I believe what you think of as paint is actually a skim coat. Skim coats used for covering stone and concrete may have the paint or a pigment mixed in. Your photo is not clear to me and I originally did not open the question because I don’t know of a paint that is like cardboard. I do know (cement & sand) or other stucco like coatings have been used to ...


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Our HOA replaces deck boards (5/4 ) treated yellow pine, about every 7 years . As I remember they were stained once at installation. My deck is 2 X treated yellow pine and was over 15 years old when I replaced parts of a couple boards. I have stained it twice. ( East TX , hot and about 48" of rain). I would say it is a mistake to use 5/4 instead of 2 X ,...


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I always use diluted muriatic acid to remove rust stains from masonry, but it's a dangerous chemical that can cause burns, blindness and lung injury if misused. It's also known as hydrochloric acid. There is a product called Bar Keeper's Friend that looks like scouring powder, but it contains oxalic acid, which removes rust stains and is not as dangerous as ...


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