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3

That doesn't look like a problem. Mortar cracks like this in brick facing are not uncommon as a home ages and settles slightly. A problem would be when the crack is opening up and showing significant movement. I would, however, re-point or caulk this mortar to prevent water from infiltrating and then freezing and possibly opening this up wider.


1

Removing bricks is easy. It's putting them back up, properly, that takes some skill & experience to do right. It's been my experience that anytime you have someone do brickwork for you it gets expensive. But in your case, if it were me, I would use a circular saw with a concrete cutting blade on it and just cut the bricks below the window vertically ...


0

Use a flat head screwdriver; that will probably work. If you can't get any leverage, use pliers to get more leverage on the screwdriver. Good luck!


0

The tool designed for the job is a screw extractor You can get these from most hardware outlets. They're handy to have in your toolkit. Here's a detailed explanation: https://www.wikihow.com/Use-a-Screw-Extractor There are plenty of videos online, just search your favourite video site for screw extractor


1

Since it is a plastic box I would grab the screw head with locking pliers ("vice grips") literally as tight as possible, and try to turn it out. This should be able to force the screw to turn in the plastic, despite the rust. I would recommend not removing the box until you've exhausted other possibilities. The cost of the new box is not the issue,...


0

I had good luck with Rustoleum rust dissolver (gel).


1

I once removed a really badly rusted screw with a pair of locking pliers (AKA mole wrench, vice grip). I'd tried penetrating oil, big screwdrivers including an offset screwdriver, and (if I recall) using some impact, all to no avail, and I didn't hold out much hope — but the mole wrench got it turning fairly easily. So if you have one of those, it's well ...


5

Cut strip in middle. Bend each part and use as a "spanner" to friction turn the screws while also applying torque to the screws. Having three arms or a helper makes this easier. Once you have even slight screw movement a vice-grip can grip the heads. Filing flats on opposite sides of a screw head make it much easier to grip them with a vice-grip, ...


4

The box looks like it is plastic, so if you can get a good grip on the screws, they should be able to be forcibly removed. You could start with the impact driver, then the ole Dremel a deep slot in the top, and if that fails, I like Willk's suggestion of hacking (or cutting) out the crossbar to get more access to the screw head. A vice grips should work ...


5

Try using an impact driver , the other rusted screw may shear off though , judging by its condition. I'd opt replacing the box , as its too much headache to fix. If you do get it out, try adding antiseize next time to the screws or getting a box that has a better design regarding screw placement and water entry (ip rated waterproof/outdoor gpo?) or even ...


13

Hacksaw? If you saw thru the rusty plate (twice, one for left slot and one for right) and remove it by pulling it out from under the screw, the remaining screw will be sticking up enough for you to get hold of the whole head with a pliers and unscrew it. It is hard to argue w Alaska Man (or you) re merits of replacing the whole box. But it seems like you ...


8

WD-40 is NOT a good penetrating oil. Liquid Wrench is better, but still not that great. The best kinds are called Kroil or PB Blaster, you can find them in auto parts stores. But if you don't have an auto parts store nearby, wintergreen oil can be bought at many drug stores and is much much better than WD-40 or Liquid Wrench. With a good penetrating oil you ...


0

That 9cm of material will be a form of plaster. However, I highly suggest you get an asbestos sample taken of it and sent away for testing. Some of these old plasters did contain asbestos previously but not all of them. You can do this fairly cheaply. Do not underestimate the danger of asbestos if you know nothing about it. Research it please. Any damage to ...


0

The cracks in your photo of the bricks are probably from the foundation settling. There are many reasons for it to settle. Most are due to the surrounding earth getting removed or saturated (soft and compressed). Either leaves the concrete/block unsupported. Due to the immense weight of the structure that area settles away from the supported part. I don't ...


0

Those cracks in the mortar and drywall don't look out of the ordinary and, while the photo of the crawl space is poor, nothing is obviously wrong there. If in doubt, get a structural engineer to inspect the foundation and see if there is any movement that is going to compromise the structure. Otherwise, just repair the damage and be done with it.


1

If you want to preserve the bottom layer of brick the surface brick should be removed as delicately as possible. This may be difficult depending on how the top bricks were set in place. I would say ,based on your description, they are set in a mortar base. If so then the best technique for removal is to chisel them up. Insert a wide brick chisel (or similar ...


2

Removing bricks set in cement/mortar is basically just a brute-force operation. You can use any of the following methods: A short 4 pound sledge hammer and mason chisel to break things apart at the joints A full size 6-12 pound sledge hammer to just crush everything to dust and a pickaxe for chipping loose parts An SDS hammer with a chisel attachment to ...


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