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1

Most likely, you can get by with replacing the screen. Use a putty knife to remove the door by slipping the wheels at the bottom off the track. They're spring loaded; lift the whole door up, and then use the putty knife to lift the wheels off the track, while you pull the door towards you, assuming you're in front of the door. Be gentle, patient and ...


1

As noted in a comment, unless the frame itself is damaged, you just replace the screen in the existing frame. I'm guessing that the "damage" in the outside picture is just an odd aberation caused by your camera, or you'd be asking how to repair siding, too! :) You pull the spline out of the groove and remove the old screen. You might be able to ...


0

Each hinge has 4 screws that allow you to move the door in 6 directions. One of the screws does exactly what you describe, it moves the door left and right. Go to youtube and search "adjust ikea door", you'll become an expert in 5 minutes.


0

There are two screws that are NOT for fastening, but for adjustment. They are on top of the hinge, and are visible even after assembly. The hinge clicks into its bracket. These screws are for alignment of the door. And there are other screws for fastening. They are on the hinge bracket, and screw into the wood. These are not visible after assembly. Can you ...


2

You have a few options: Place the casing over the drywall and jamb as usual, and let it tilt a bit due to the 1/8in difference. When you apply the caulking to the seams, the difference will not be noticeable. The bevel joints at the jamb corners will be slightly dipped, and you can minimize the visual distraction by applying some drywall compound and ...


0

The maker of the door will give you the max and minimum opening it will fit in. Off the shelf shower doors, so they will fit varying sizes of showers will make up the difference by the lap/overhang of the glass on the hinge side of the door. This will only allow the door to open out, which is code. If the door is custom made, it would be possible to have it ...


2

See this very relevant answer for details of what to do to disassemble/reassemble the door. You'll have to go through a similar process but without being able to cut the door apart, since you don't want to dispose of the bottom panel. Disassembling the door, especially since that appears (based on the door nob) to be an old door, is going to be rather ...


1

The best way is to buy a new door. Or a used door (you may have to cut it to fit).


2

Glass is heavy and many wood doors are not constructed to bear the weight of the glass. You should look into using Plexiglass. It's third of the weight of glass and most home stores will cut it to size. You'll have to buy the whole sheet. Try to remove the panel molding off one side of your door and then remove the panel. Get an exact measurement for the ...


0

In addition to the light switch Greg mentioned, keep in mind that the door bell has wiring that usually runs along and or through the frame. Just drill slowly and keep checking the bell. If you remove the button cover, you might be able to determine the wire route.


0

You could use a stud finder tool. It probably won't work beside the door because of casing (trim work) overlapping the door jamb and extending onto the wall. But in typical US stick-frame construction the outermost wall stud goes the entire height from floor to ceiling. Use the stud finder to find the edge of the stud above the door, the translate that down ...


3

Most wood frame houses use at least two 2x4s or 2x6s(stud plus a jack post) plus the door frame at doors/windows. That gives minimum of a bit more than three to 3½" inches before hitting something.


0

May not suit code, but a piece of plywood 3" wider than the stud spacing and 3" taller than the opening you cut in the drywall between studs will make an access panel (distinct from "door" in that no hinges, screw/unscrew to use, suitable for infrequent use only.) Code may require a minimum size and the space between studs may not meet ...


3

They sell spring loaded access panels up to about 24"x24" (see picture below). If that's big enough that will be the simplest option. Simply cut a hole smaller than the panel and you are done. To cut a hole you have lots of options. The right option is probably a dry wall saw or similar but if you have one an old steak knife will do. When you cut ...


4

I'd recommend a prehung knee-wall door. A prehung door is already on hinges in a door frame. A small 24 x 48 door would be very manageable. You can buy them online in various sizes. I understand you're not an experienced handyman but a small pre hung door would be a fairly easy installation for you and since the door is hidden , if it's not aesthetically ...


0

Firstly, you wouldn't cover the carpet in that scenario. You just use a termination molding with a vertical face against which carpet is tucked. ____________ / _________| |||||||| | | |||||||| |____| Then, if you don't have room for the transition you need, it's fairly painless to shorten a door from the bottom. That shouldn't be ...


2

A metal fire rated door is not required. The door between the garage and house shall be 1) a solid wood door a minimum of 1 3/8” thick, 2) solid or honeycomb core steel door that is not less than 1 3/8” thick, or 3) a 20 minute fire rated door. (See ICC R309.1) A door is not allowed between the garage and a sleeping room. (See ICC R309.1 openings) I’d use a ...


0

I’m not sure I completely understand the layout, but you can tell me where I’m wrong. There is no floor load resting on this wall/beam. The roof load has a span of 20’, so 10’ rests on the wall/ beam and the other 10’ rests on another wall. So, depending on where you’re located, normal snow loads range from 25 lbs. per square foot (psf) to 35 psf. I’ll use ...


-1

I would recommend something this: It is for wood, but I think it will do fine with thin steel. Name should be coach bolt. Drill hole through door big enough for thread on the bolt to pass freely. But too small for the rectangular extension under the head. Insert bolt from outside of the door and screw nut from inside. The extension should extend round hole ...


1

Another thing you might try is to create an "adapter plate" to spread the load of the door closer over a larger area of the door. As you've already experienced, that this sheet metal is not capable of supporting the door-closer forces centered at the 3-4 screws on the closer. A piece of aluminum plate could be used to spread the load to 5-10 screws ...


2

Have you considered old-fashioned butterfly anchors (AKA toggle bolts)? They're fairly burly, cheap, widely available, and don't require any specialty tools, equipment, machining, etc. Note that for a foam-filled door, you would need to do some fiddling to make sure the "wings" can actually open up in there, but just sticking a scribing tool in the ...


2

Could I suggest not using screws at all, and using something like 3M VHB (Very High Bonding) tape? Some varieties are stronger than rivets, at least according to 3M, and is used in a lot of places where rivets used to be used, such as in attaching various parts of cars to the frame, or in bonding parts of airplane wings together. See https://www.3m.com/3M/...


1

Due to the carpet thickness I trimmed 1.5 inches off the bottom of the door that was 79". The rail was about an inch thick so the old rail was in tact from the trimmed part. I was able to pull the door outsides off the door, and with a little sanding was able to glue the old rails in place. To reinforce the rails I added this part which my local Lowes ...


7

Since security could be a concern, I'd suggest a plate on the outside with square holes punched, or round holes drilled to accept carriage bolts that go all the way through the door and nuts on the inside. This will prevent anyone from being able to remove bolts from the outside. If you drill a clearance hole through the plate, you can use a file to square ...


14

This appears to be well suited to a rivnut installation. The threaded insert is placed in a hole sized appropriately to the insert, the tool is used to compress the portion inside the door and the threads remain for the bolt to engage. Rivnuts are best used on thin sheet material. Rivnut tools can be quite expensive, but those are primarily for production ...


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