New answers tagged

1

No and no (well yes, but not with the results that you want) It was done that way because it was installed backwards (on purpose) as an out-swing door rather than the typical in-swing door while the door frame itself was not reversed and is set up for the in-swing condition. Note that the piece of wood that the door closes against (stop molding) is not ...


2

Sometimes sheds just are not built like standard construction. You are right that the door is mostly hung on what appears to be brick molding. If you want real strength from the hinges and the latch side of the door, setting it back into the opening where you can grab studs is going to be your best bet. Having the door inset a bit also makes prying ...


0

You don't have a lot of choices because you need to have the piece thin. Even plastic might be too thick. Wood would look very good I believe, and can be as thin as veneer. Put a nice veneer on a sheet of metal backing. And, with veneer, you have lots of options for the wood species, including many exotics and others. You can get veneer with a sticky ...


1

If you want it to match the color of the satin nickel hardware as good as possible, I would recommend cutting it from... Satin Nickel. The same companies that make door locks also make "kick plates" for the bottom of the door, and smaller "push plates" that are made to push open a door that doesn't have a knob (normally seen in commercial doors). Here is ...


0

Mix a combination of water, white vinegar, and dish soap (not dishwashing detergent) in equal parts into a spray bottle. Gently shake it before use. Spray it on the surfaces that you want to clean and let it sit for at least 10 minutes. The longer it sits, the less elbow grease you will have to use. After sitting for the stated time, wipe and rinse off ...


0

If u have a solid hard wood door trimming from the door would be the easiest way to go but if it is not one solid piece of wood by all means go for the rough opening.


5

I could give you some easy tips on adjusting the door and jamb but I would only do that if there wasn't the option to - make the frame bigger (rough opening). You can plane off 1/4" on one of the sides in about 5-10 minutes and you won't be messing with the integrity of the door you bought. You can plane sloppy and with shims you are still good to go.


0

Best bet is to trim the door on the hinge side. Why? Why the door and not the frame? Easier, cleaner, can remove the door to work on, much harder to work on the frame in place or reinstall the frame. Why the hinge side and not the latch side? For the very simple reason that the door latch is not adjustable and set by the distance of the hole for the knobs. ...


0

Yes it is the contractor's fault. They should have went over this, this is what you pay a contractor for - expertise. That being said there isn't much to do because you paid for it and agreed. You can give contractor a bad review... Generally you see how exposed a door is to the outside and the rain patterns in the area and go with a manufacturers ...


0

If it were me, I would trim off the latch side of the door, and reduce the width of the jamb appropriately. There are ways that can reinforce that part of the door if needed, but it would be more difficult to reinforce the hinge side which is where most of the forces are.


0

Had this same problem for a long time and now I've solved it. Always squeegee the door after showering and: When a film develops spray the wet door with Ka-Boom, lightly wiping it with a plastic kitchen scrub pad. The pad won't scratch the glass and easily removes the lime-scale. You can buy it in most stores.


0

I HAVE TRIED ALL OF THE REMEDIES AND THEY PROVIDE TERRIBLE RESULTS. The following recipe WILL absolutely work on the worst of all soap scum on shower glass doors & hard water spots & stains . You must go to the store and buy a new BAR OF LAVA HAND SOAP - not any other thing or brand except LAVA BAR SOAP.. Get the glass wet and proceed to rub that ...


1

There's usually a removable stop or jamb component that would allow you to lift the doors off the track. You may also need to remove a channel or rod to allow the doors to be swung outward at the bottom. Then you'd make adjustments to the bracket length using the screws you can see there. Modern hardware has more convenient means of adjustment.


1

Self answering! I finally brought my measurements with me to Home Depot and sure enough they had what I needed! I wasn’t sure it was going to fit during the installation but the blinds turned out to be perfect, real snug. In my circumstances I needed to order 24”x66” blinds (which seem obvious). I should have brought my measurements and pictures the first ...


2

I recently replaced some hollow bi-fold doors that enclosed my air handler for my AC and heating unit. I got the heaviest, highest density, doors I could find. It's amazing how much the sound has been reduced. Definitely go with solid.


2

Looking over the product guides etc. for the JeldWen, it does not say if it is a solid or hollow core door, although its price say solid. Never the less, when looking for sound deadening in doors, always go for density, in this case solid doors. And if both doors are solid, go for the heaviest one. That is if the difference is in pounds. Don't sweat it if ...


3

From my experience solid core doors will block sound much better than hollow core. Solid core is also a heavier door which can be a plus although sometimes makes it a little more difficult to install. Also, you want to make sure the door is pre-drilled for your hardware and pre-hung. The Jeld-Wen door you sited is a slab door and is not pre-hung. Slab doors ...


0

I’d try Restoration Hardware stores, especially the ones that have antique hardware (doors, lights, etc.) in their store. You can send a picture and they’ll try to match it up. I’d also try Habitat for Humanity retail outlets. If that doesn’t work, try Emtek.com. They have a terrible website , but great customer service. Give them a call.


1

As I mentioned in my comment above it will be very difficult to identify the maker of your old lockset. However. you shouldn't have to if you're simply going to replace it. It should be relatively easy to find a replacement lockset that will fit this door without too much adjusting of the door. However, you're probably not going to know until you remove ...


1

Page 16 of the boiler installation guide PDF (Section 7.3 - Ventilation of Compartments) points out that no air vents are required in cupboards or compartments with your boiler. This is because although the boiler requires oxygen in order to burn the gas correctly, your boiler has a double walled (balanced) flue and takes in all the air it needs through the ...


0

If you locate the make and model of your boiler, and look it up on the internet, there will most certainly be an install guide available on the makers website. If you posted a picture of the label on your question if you have had difficulty in finding what I mentioned, we can look it up for you. The guidelines listed by the maker MUST be followed, there is ...


2

If no flex and not moisture damage, the classic method of repair is: Find a drywall paste and use fiberglass-net type tape to reinforce it, directions are on the label. Use a 6” or 8” trowel and build up in layers after each one dries. Prime before painting. Fill large cracks with foam or butyl tape/strips/rope first, then cover with layers of drywall ...


0

If the blue circle is accurate in your picture, there is not that much damage to keep an oversized strike from working. Home Centers carry these although they are not the best looking item, they will fix the problem easily. Picture courtesy Home Depot You may even be able to use a "tee" strike, the strike is slightly larger than the standard, easy to ...


0

You could use drywall mud, over patch it and then sand down to match. 'Hot mud' is stronger but is harder to sand so get it closer to the proper shape before letting it dry.


8

What you are looking for is a rim lock


1

Depending the style of trim and width, will help determine how much fudging can be done. Usually, depending on the trim choice and whether it is mitered or not, 1/2" can be taken away by moving the jamb past the wall at the top and the bottom to aid in getting it closer to plumb and carve away the drywall strategically to help ease the trim to meet the wall ...


3

It massively depends on the quality of the locks. I buy Home Depot cheapies, and I just replace locksets using the package codes on the lock-sets to get multiples of the same key. (If you have 3 sets that all say "Key Code 12589”, they will all have the same key). However I am transitioning to using Schlage Primus, a dual-keyway patented system which ...


2

The difference is Schlages are worth re-keying, and that's almost always the only reason to remove one. Defiant is Kwikset, which is crap, and they break. For $60 you can get a Schlage re-keying kit. And for a few hundred dollars you can get a key duplicator. With both of those, e.g., you can make the gate key use just two of the pins that are the same for ...


1

@George Anderson is correct - rekeying the back door to the front door is the easiest and least expensive. Having just gone through this at my daughter's home I have one other thought. If you bought the garage deadbolt at HD go back with the deadbolts from the garage and the rear door and keys for both and have them all rekeyed the same - one key instead of ...


1

If your existing deadbolts are in good shape and functioning well, by far the easiest and least expensive is to rekey (re-pin) one of the deadbolts to match the other. Not sure of the cost, but probably under $10.


5

I don't recommend this if the door is exposed to any sort of weather. The threshold is different. This is the big issue, as you don't want standing water, and an exterior door isn't designed to deal with indoor rain. You'd also end up with rain pooling on the top edge of the door, which might be bad. Make sure all the hinges are rated for outdoor use; you ...


0

The hinges would be my only concern, if the door skin is the same I don’t see any difference. You have the hinges covered. If you live in a high crime area maybe add a strike cover to prevent the “credit card” key but I don’t see any problems.


2

I disagree with replacing this. If you replace this you will need to replace both sides and that can be a domino on the rest of the house. Just eyeballing that trim, you aren't finding it at big box. That looks like 3" semi-rounded pine from late 60s - early 80s. Sure you could find something close and then shake your head every time you walk by it. ...


1

You can either get new trim, or if you're feeling adventurous, pick up some wood filler and use it to try to level it out. I would go for a 2-part epoxy filler like this: If you have some regular 2-part epoxy sitting around, you could use that, but it might be a bit too thin. Either way, you'll need to sand, then prime and paint over it once it is fully ...


1

How much time and money do you want to spend? This video about fixing rotted window sills with epoxy should give you a good idea of something which you might be able to do. https://youtu.be/3l5q0xaQEf8 If you're crunched for time and money then you can buy some wood filler and a large taping knife such as this 14 inch one: Sand down any high paint peaks, ...


0

I had about a dozen instances of this problem, caused by a lodging dog, on high-end fitted furniture finished with poyurethane varnish. I just planed or sanded out the chewed areas to make them curve smoothly, and applied two coats of the original varnish, and that was it. You can still see all the dents. It's just part of the history of the house. And ...


5

I would go to the big box store and buy a small piece of trim and see if it matches. If it does then @Michael Karas has the right answer. If you cant match the trim then I would repair it with body filler. If you're not experienced with body filler, use several thin layers so you don't have to do a lot of sanding. For sanding wrap sand paper around a block ...


12

I would just replace the trim. If you were good with an oscillating saw or sharp wood chisel you could cut the molding just above the damaged area at an angle. Remove everything from there down. When you take out the lower piece try to keep a piece that is undamaged so you can take it with you when you go searching for replacement trim. Hard to tell from ...


0

So I starting looking into the failure of my 3 point door locks and heard a clanking when trying to put them into the locked position. I realized that the "shootbolts" were slamming against the side of the door. Why? Was there an internal jam? A broken parts. Turns out there is a small bottom plate with a hole that receives the shootbolt (pic attached) ...


3

You need to study the door and its sag carefully. Some things to look at: When you pull up on the door knob edge of the door do you see: Does it look like the door jamb on the upper hinge side is moving? Does the jamb look solid but the upper corner of the door is moving toward the hinge side? Or does it appear as if the door itself is flexing? The answer ...


7

In all my years of hanging doors, prehung and many from scratch, where the hinges were cut in as well as all the other hardware, I have never needed to bend a single hinge. If the sagging is from loose screws, they need tightening or replace with a longer screw for better grab. Sometimes the hinge need a shim placed behind it cut from cardboard and build up ...


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