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0

That's my lock! It's an e series that is expensive. https://absupply.net/pdf/E-and-EB-Ser-Lock-1982-Cat-Pag.pdf


1

if you want to use wire bend both ends of the wire round the anchor tab of the blocker. I worry that wire might mar the door handle, something soft like string or parachute cord might be a better choice. You may need an assistant to help you tie the knot.


5

Use cable ties instead of the elastic bands.


0

I can't make out the branding on your existing hinges, so can't be really specific, but sometimes the soft close spring/damper just breaks on these hinges. The thing to do is source replacements, which isn't (unfortunately) as easy as it sounds, as there's a staggering variety in these hinges. Best case is that you can find a real brick and mortar cabinet ...


-1

See below-linked article for "how to". https://www.wikihow.com/Adjust-Soft-Close-Hinges


0

Get stick-on mylar mirror sheets. You won't have to trim the shelves and you'll avoid having the heavy weight of a glass mirror swinging back and forth on those hinges. Those cabinets are not built for that.


1

You'll have to remove the shelves and have the and have the edges cut to make room for the mirror. There's a possibility that the actual hinges and opener could be adjusted to allow for the additional space. The mirror could be assembled using mirror tiles from your home store and heavy duty double sided tape. As a last resort, you could mount a mirror on ...


1

You need to cut the back of each shelf the mirror will touch. As it isn't exposed cutting the MDF shouldn't effect the look. You will also need to buy a pretty light weight and thin mirror and just glue it (adhesive caulk) it to the door.


1

You need to identify which door goes in which opening. If they're newer "pre-hung" doors of the same brand, then the doors should all be exactly the same size and the hinges will have been installed at the factory into precut mortises that are spaced exactly the same distance from the top & bottom of the doors. There's a chance that different ...


2

Baby roaches are the least of your worries The problem you're not seeing here is that this isn't just any old door. Due to the fact it's the entrance to your apartment from the corridor, it's a fire door, and that means its proper functioning is critical to keeping you and your neighbors safe should the unthinkable happen. As a result, I'd do everything in ...


1

Roach spray. Which you need anyway because roaches are coming in. Keep the can by the door and add spray around the frame and at the bottom when you think of roaches. Roaches on their way in probably rest in the tight space while they decide what to do. Those that do will soak up the poison.


2

I did a house a few years ago that I replace 24 doors total (including sliding doubles for closets in 5 bedrooms). So 14 doors that I had to chisel out hinge sets. So here is what you need to think about: Can I get doors in the correct width? Cutting a half inch out on the hinge side will be fine. Once you get more than that there are issues (tell you ...


0

I'm really not sure what kind of answer you expect. This project is wholeheartedly based on your skill level. This guy installs a slab door in about 10 minutes. If you have all the tools available then theoretically you can do all the doors in less than one day.


1

I just saw the updated picture of the door from the outside and instead of continuing to add more comments, I see something of concern, related to water infiltration from above the door. It's hard to tell for sure from that angle, but it sure looks like you have a big flat area above the door with no obvious drainage path. It could be a camera distortion ...


7

Surprised no one has yet said: Get an electrician, with a meter and all that, who can check voltages on those wires, and work it all out logically, without making things any worse. If you are in Europe / UK then I would expect that you are playing with relatively low voltages, but even so, there is potential (no pun intended) for things to go badly wrong if ...


3

What you're looking at is a commercial-style mortise latchset; since we know it's a Schlage, a quick peek in their current catalog matches this to their L-series of latchsets. These are fairly tough beasts on their own, tested to BHMA Grade 1 standards (and beyond) for commercial and institutional use (for instance: the high-rise office building I work in ...


4

Those little screws are never going to resist the door forces. Not ever. Not even with Loctite, The strike is upside down Look carefully. See the rectangular hole. See the vertical centerline of that hole. Now see the line between the screws. The rectangular hole is NOT on the screw centerline, it is offset slightly left (toward the ramp). Flipping it ...


1

Those appear to be sheet metal screws: they cut their own thread into the tabs of that box. The thread of a sheet metal screw is quite coarse and doesn't lend itself to being tightened (and staying that way) especially when vibration or impact are involved. (photos below are from www.globalindustrial.com) I'd replace the screws, first one and then the other,...


1

Looks like the screws thread into female-threaded holes in the strike plate. It also looks possibly like there is some wood back there visible through the strike plate. It's hard to tell what the threads of the screw are actually biting into. It's possible if you used a power tool, the substrate may have been stripped, or the screws are stripped. A couple ...


1

Remove one screw. Loosen the other screw. Add a drop of thread locker to the removed screw and install. Remove the other screw. Add a drop of thread locker to it and install. Tighten both screws very snugly* with the strike plate in the proper location. Generally speaking there are 2 grades of thread locker compound. One is removable (taking quite a bit of ...


16

Go to the neighbor who you get along well with, but whose doorbell doesn't work now. Unscrew that doorbell from the wall and look at the wiring, but don't disconnect it. Duplicate that setup in your doorbell and odds are good that will fix it. You'll end up with something disconnected behind your doorbell - make sure you put a wire nut on it to ensure it ...


11

Chances are good that the two wires that were connected send power to the other "downstream" doorbells (your neighbors). The wire by itself would be the one that goes to your doorbell. Reconnect the wires that were connected and leave the single wire hanging (cover the exposed wire) and that should be all you need to do.


3

So another option instead of casting a new one is to cut that worn part off, then drill and tap it to receive a new threaded bit cut to length. Should work well.


3

That is an antique cabinet door latch called a Hoosier Cabinet Latch. If you want a similar latch you could contact the House of Antiques Hardware at 888-223-2545 or at Van Dyke's Restorers, 1-800-237-8833 This is what I found when I Googled antique cabinet door latch. hope this helps.


2

One alternative is to replace the wood that could be exposed to water. They make 100% vinyl trim that will not wick water. I tend to agree with Willk that water is driving up against your door, which is your root issue. If an awning is not an option, a cheaper alternative could be a rain diverter or limited gutters to help channel the water away from the ...


7

Those bottom corners are the only problematic locations, right? Referring to Page #7 of these Jeld-Wen installation Instructions which I recently followed. You are missing the foam wedges Go to the millwork desk of your local big box home improvement store and ask if they have any extra they could give you. I'm sure Amazon carries them as well. It looks ...


3

Front porch? Your front door seems pretty exposed. And your yard looks nice. You could put a front porch in front of your house. The porch would blunt the force of incoming weather. You could enclose it in screens, although just a roof would prevent a lot of direct assault by wind and rain. It is kind of an expensive fix for a leaky front door. But when ...


4

You'll need to look straight on at the gaps around the door (top and sides) - any place you see daylight (like the bottom left corner in the first picture) will need to have the weather stripping replaced. Usually, this means replacing the weather stripping along that entire side - to my knowledge, piecing it together along one side probably isn't the best ...


0

The lock you have is a lock of the same type which is used to secure a high quality screen door. You have that type of lock because the building is old. The door thickness, make, cut, and style are from the days when skeleton key locks were used. And no, they were not very secure. Granted, the dead bolt is not fantastic, but the dead bolt is secure enough. ...


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