New answers tagged

1

To be honest, I would seriously consider replacing the door. Sometimes the "big" fix turns out to be the cheapest & easiest, particularly if the door is a typical indoor door and a standard size (or close enough that you can get a standard size door and trim it to fit). However, one possibility that might work is a door reinforce: But (a) it ...


1

I had a similar problem with a Sierra Pacific door. On mine you raise the handle (clockwise) to lock and lower the handle (counter clockwise) to unlock. I lowered the handle as far as it would go and then with a small screw driver pry the pins up / down to fully retract the locking mechanism. That would be your pin in picture #2 and the one that goes into ...


0

You will never be able to repair the door so it will look undamaged. Here are a couple of suggestions to repair the door so the repair isn't obvious: If you used a hole saw and saved the door chunk that was drilled out find how it was oriented in the door. next lay the door on a flat surface. apply tape over the opening on the inside face of the door. Remove ...


0

Unfortunately,you found a drill. It looks like you used a hole saw so if you have a set, use the next larger size and cut a plug from a piece of wood the same thickness and file it down to fit in the hole. Use wood filler to fill in the rest. If you have a jig saw, trace the hole on a piece of wood and cut it out and glue it into the hole. Last resort would ...


1

You need 2 wires from each sensor. The colors need to be tied together and wired to the opener as the installation instructions show. Usually, the 2 whites are tied together and put on the #2 terminal and the black/white wires are tied together and wired the the #3 terminal. Do this separately for each door. There are 2 sensors for each door and they have to ...


1

Tracers tend to emit signals that migrate to nearby wires, especially flat cables like doorbell wire. set the tone injector to continuity test mode and see which cable makes it light up when you connect the wires together.


1

I did exactly that because I was always getting locked out. The finish on an exterior knob/handle may not last as long if used as an exterior knob/handle. I have a storm door with glass so that's not a concern for me. If someone is trying to break in they'll have a harder time with the deadbolt than the door knob.


0

My folks have the same issue. They have a lot of moisture in clay soil, and even with modern frost footings this happens. There's really no hope of preventing seasonal movement. I think enlarging your strike plate bore is the right fix. Be sure to maintain security by installing a thicker plate if needed.


1

My first time attempting to drill a 3/32 hole. My drill wouldn't work, wouldn't drill a small hole in my wooden double door. I discovered I hadn't turned the red knob on the drill to the right. It was drilling the wrong way. I found this site to try and figure out why the hole wasn't working. It is interesting reading all your comments. Who knew? lol


4

Cut a plug of wood to the height and width of the two mortises. Use pine and cut the depth so the plug stands slightly proud when set in the mortises. You want the mortises to be a single mortise so chisel out any partition. Cut the mortise to fit the plug. With a utility knife define the shape of the plug on the jamb. Cut away any parts that obstruct it's ...


7

Shims. Go to the local home center and get some of the (free?) laminate counter top samples in the kitchen cabinet section, they are about 3x5 inches. I then cut them to the same size as the hinge plate. Remove the hinge, place it on the sample and trace around it, it does not need to perfect but it should not be bigger then the hinge. I cut them with tin ...


2

If the plate went the entire height of the door, it would be called an Astragal. The best citation I found for this is Oxford Languages (Google's dictionary search partner), but there is no link. noun: astragal; plural noun: astragals a convex molding or wooden strip across a surface or separating panels, typically semicircular in cross-section. ARCHITECTURE ...


3

The protective plate around the keyhole in a door is called an escutcheon plate, but the term can be used to describe a metal plate serving a similar purpose, either protecting a mechanism or a surface or finish, on architectural fittings like doors and windows as well as on furniture. Hope this is somewhere close to useful.


2

I'd verify the threshold is level and if it's not note which side is higher. Remove the treated 2x underneath the threshold and check for level again. If the side that's binding is too high tapping it down with a hammer and a wood block on top of the high spot should at least enable the door to shut smoothly. Once the door functions properly you'll need to ...


6

Step 1: Properly size the support lumber What we see there looks like more than just swelling to me. It seems like someone jammed a full-thickness two-by in there out of haste. Swelling was just the final straw that caused rubbing. You'll need to remove it. Use a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) to cut any fasteners running through it, then pry it out. Then flex ...


8

One match is "Latch Guard":


15

Some doors have this plate that guards the latch mechanism. You have one answer in that sentence, Guard and latch, just reverse them to "Latch Guard". It is called many things, A "latch shield" Or "Door latch guard" Or "Latch protector". To name a few.


1

Pretty much just normal shrinkage in winter as things dry out, possibly aggravated by using damp wood or not running A/C in the hot/wet summertime - so if replaced/installed/painted before you moved in in the summer, it would be swelled up, and as you run heat and indoor humidity falls in the winter, the wood shrinks. Personally I'd suggest waiting through a ...


0

I see several options, though it's difficult to be sure from one photo. Set the header into the roof framing cavity. You mention that the rafters are parallel. If they're not directly over the header you may have more room than you realize. Since the wall is parallel to the rafters you may not actually need a load-bearing header. Doubled 2x6 may be adequate....


1

Just go to any hardware store or one of the big box stores (orange or blue) and they will fix you up.


3

It’s not structural. It’s just a design we use for “clean lines” without the grooves and notches in the trim, etc. If you were to remove the entire frame, you’d see that there are shims along the head and jambs. Any structural load can’t be transferred to the jambs if there’s shims in the head, AND the frame can’t be “squared” without the shims. This design ...


1

Looks like you should be able to pry down this circular plate and the door will be released. Shove a screwdriver in there or a spackle knife. You'll want to support the door as upright as possible when doing this because the lateral force on the pin is immense.


1

I’d seal up the doors, etc and use a sound baffling return air duct. Install the duct between studs with an opening near the ceiling (on the hall side so you’re away from the footsteps) and the other opening near the floor (on the room side) with baffles about 2’ apart.


0

You might consider a longer shower base - we found one about 1.2m long and 80 wide which meant we did not need a door at all as there was very little splash out. And we had this with a sloped ceiling as well, the shower head had to be in the top corner as I am 6ft plus - for my (ex)wife that was not an issue.


-1

I presume you’re going to get a Building Permit to do the work. If so, I can see several Code violations that you’ll need to correct: Incorrect height of handrail. Handrail does not extend far enough at top of stair. Height of ceiling on top landing is too low. Incorrect bedroom window size. Window needs to be changed to egress window regardless if the ...


2

Inside the door frame is a tube like opening that runs the length of the frame. It is an integral part of the frame and is formed when the metal is extruded through a die. The opening usually gets broken or is forced wider when the screw is turned to tight. Also corrosion occurs over time. You can try this first: get a screw of the same diameter as the ...


0

All you can do at this point is disassemble the door and line up the missing pieces. There will be some rubber gaskets around the glass that will have to be put back in place. Work on one corner at a time, secure it with the screw and then go to the next corner. when the four corners re assembled, tighten all four screws.


1

You need a Floor guide. Most are installed on the floor, sometimes they attach to the wall at the base of the door. They come in a variety of kinds, some just plane plastic, some with rollers, some adjustable ETC. You can buy them or you could make something from materials you already have on hand. It really is just a tab or roller that keeps the bottom ...


0

Without a bottom track, I can think of three issues: The wall is not vertical (plumb) but the doors are. The doors are not plumb, which means they are not attached correctly to hang straight underneath the track support (such as you mounted the door on the wrong side of the hanger.) There's an air current pushing the doors into the wall (such as a duct ...


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