New answers tagged

2

Nope. Mirror paint does not work that way. It's not a surface coating, it has to be molecularly smooth and that can't be painted on. Generally mirror coatings are on the glass itself, and on the backside. The fogged glass has already wrecked the possibility of doing that. Feel free to obtain actual mirror glass and replace the glass in your cabinets, ...


2

"water tends to flow towards the door" is your problem. The right way to fix this is to redo the exterior so water will flow away from the house. Sealing the gap would be a good secondary action, but if you leave it at that, you'll constantly be dealing with leaks.


0

A stained glass repair person could repair this but expect it to be a bit expensive and take some time (they’d have to remove the entire side window so that they can work on it), and the match will likely not be perfect. Or you can a stained glass workshop at your local community college and do it yourself. Warning, it’s very addictive.


2

The Schlage B60 series allows you to very simply remove a non-functional internal cuff which enables the large lock to fit into the smaller hole. No cutting or enlargement necessary. Just did it. Very simple and I understand many other lock manufacturers also offer this option in order to insert modern door locks into older door holes.


2

Try this: Lift the door as you close it. Does it latch? From the outside of the door, watch the latch hit the strike plate. Is it missing the hole in the strike plate? If the latch is in line with the hole, does the door close far enough for the edge of the latch to get into the hole. Sometimes the house will settle or shift. The door jamb may no ...


1

Good luck. Unless the door is fairly recent, it is unlikely that the replacement is still being made. This is one of those fashion things. It's trendy for a few years, then is passe. Thoughts: Replace all three panels. This allows you to maintain the similar looks, but opens the door to more providers. The existing setup illustration is insecure. ...


1

One other thing you can try, and my dad tells me constantly, is if you have a door that stops latching, try replacing some of the hinge screws to larger/longer screws. From the scrape on the plate being at the bottom, replacing one or two screws in the top hinge may help cant the door up so it latches again.


2

My guess is the door has warped, touching the top or the bottom or both top and bottom of the door jam. If you remove that jam and reinstall it to follow the curvature of the door, when it is properly closed, that should fix the problem.


4

You can remove the active door to help with transporting it on site, but often the inactive door is permanently fixed and not easily removable. If it is easily removable for some reason, then sure go for it. Caulk the threshold, insert the frame, and then reinstall both active and inactive doors before going any further in the installation. Using temporary ...


8

Don't do that! You will never get the frame aligned properly in the opening if you take the doors out. If you can't handle the door yourself, get someone to help. To elaborate a bit more. The doors in the frame provide 3-dimensional stability to the frame. Then you take them out the frame will distort in nearly all possible ways. You will never be able ...


2

If you make the plate with spacers combined with internal threads you should be able to arrange that the screws cause a clamping on one surface and just a bit of compression on the whole thickness.


0

A second opinion from a carpenter has cleared this up. Drilling out the side of the door for a sash lock: would indeed weaken the door significantly. But a modern tubular latch: requires the removal of far less material and would be fine to fit to these doors. Alternatively, short-backset rim latches are available (if you look hard enough) as ...


0

My answer as a handy woman in a wheelchair. My wheelchair is motorized and strong but the bathroom door has been ripped off the hinges 4 times and they have had dowels placed in the screw hole first and plugs in the door side for hinges, the 4th time the screw heads are snapped off and I am NOT doing this over again. Apoxy glue to the door frame first in ...


4

Several things to check: Do you have sufficient frame depth on the other side to install a door there? As you can see, the door currently closes against a thin strip of wood along the top and vertical sides of the frame. You need just as much depth on the far side as the door thickness to be able to mount there. Draw a picture for yourself of how the ...


1

A draft stopper would probably work nicely, is not destructive, costs between $10 and $20, and stays in place even if you need to open the door:


0

I can't think of a way to do exactly what you want to do. I haven't been able to change a mortise lock prepped door to accept a cylindrical lockset without using a remodel escutcheon plate that wraps around the 3 sides of the door. Since your comment says that your end goal is to be able to install a smart lock, I'd suggest looking at commercial access ...


0

Apply glue and clamping pressure from the center and work slowly upwards. As you gradually tighten the clamps, fit the slots back in place working upwards as the space between the stiles closes. It should slide back together. You might add a mechanical fastener to the top to strengthen it. I've fixed similar doors this way. Be patient and don't rush it.


1

need to install a door knob and latch on this old interior door If you really need to do it, stop screwing about and drill the door for a standard modern lockset. You should be able to purchase the hardware and the lock/latch set at any decent window & door shop. They will lend/rent a jig to make it a simple job.


1

If the latch is in good condition, you could reconsider just replacing the knobs with new lever handles. Yes, they'll be "inboard" (towards the center of the door), but you'll maintain the hardware. Replacing the latch hardware New rim latches are available, but they're rare in the United States. You'll typically replace the latch assembly (on the door) ...


0

Given what info you have already provided us, you might want to consider adding an additional door switch to the door in question in series with the door closed sensor may suffice. You just have to demonstrate to the people concerned that it works, and it successfully alerts all people if the door is not locked. Basically, attach the free magnet part to ...


3

Talk to a competent lock dealer and ask about a storeroom lock-set. This is intended for secure office store-rooms, where there would never be a reason to leave the door unlocked. From the inside, the handle always allows egress. From the outside, the door cannot be opened without a key, period. There is not push or twist button to make the door stay ...


2

A pair of 32" doors should fit easily. Any slop at the siding can be trimmed out with a piece that covers the existing siding. Go to a real door place. They'll be able to give you a reasonable price for what you want/need. And if you need a deeper jamb for the aforementioned overlap strategy, they're equipped to deal with that. I've hated every big box ...


0

It requires much more than batteries, but otherwise I think an electronic magnetic lock would fit your needs and relieve your anxiety. As long as there is power, it will be locked when closed. A push to egress button needs to be installed nearby so that you can exit when there is power (it cuts the power to the magnet), and without power it fails safely ...


0

I have installed many screen doors for outswinging deck and french door applications. I am talking about regular framed screen doors though, not these "magnetic" or roll-up type (which in my opinion are cheesy and lame). Yes, they mount on the inside and swing inward. Yes, they are not invisible. Yes, they require a special latch assembly. Yes, they are ...


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