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1

this just happened to me and I got it without unhinging the door or sawing so wanted to help. once you remove the face and get to the picture above where the deadbolt is stuck in lock position in door but handles are removed... you'll notice that you can move the deadbolt back a little by sticking a screwdriver into the center piece with the 3 holes...(the ...


1

You're probably going to get a few opinions on this based on individual experience. Is there a reason you excluded aluminum? I have installed composite, vinyl and aluminum sliding doors and all of them have preformed well to the best of my knowledge (no complaints). They all require little maintenance. I've replaced the rollers on my aluminum doors after 30 ...


1

For what it's worth - on our doors I found that taking a Scotch-Brite pad to clean the nylon roller & to break the sharp corner at the top helped a bunch. Then cleaning the vertical surfaces of the track w/ something w/ some lubricating properties like Armor All made it even that much better (guessing WD-40 might work even better, just didn't want to ...


-1

Most doors now are hollow core which takes away from the integrity of the door to recess the hinge. Even millimeters of wood make a difference over time, so I don’t recess and use a bigger screw. Recessing the hinges are for old school solid core doors for the purpose of barring the weight of the door. The door trim installed covers and gap and prevents ...


0

You need to know what the door is made out of and how to make the hole. if the door will not be damaged by the larger hole, and you have the appropriate tools, go for it. Maybe he refused because he didn't have the right tools to enlarge the existing hole in a tidy way


3

If you're doing the herringbone inside you won't use 1x8. You'll run 1x6 all the way out. This design probably ends up the thickness of a two-by (1-1/2"), so your front frame probably shouldn't be two-by. I'd use the same 1x6 for everything (tongue-and-groove for the herringbone, square boards for the frame). If you don't use tongue-and-groove for the ...


1

Since you're dealing with a real locksmith, it's a simple matter to have 2 tiers of key. You have the "master key" which works every lock in the house. Then you have the "contractor key" which only works certain doorknobs (but not the deadbolt there). The special-pin method (sacrifices 1-3 bits of entropy) Mechanically, this is done one of two ways: ...


3

Before I start - this is a simple task but it's not as simple as it might seem at first glance. I would mount this with flat head machine screws. I would take that lock to the hardware store and see what size fits right in the countersinks (the tapered part). It might be say a size 8 machine screw. Most of are threaded with so that there are 32 threads ...


0

How handy are you? On this forum, I assume that you know which end of the screw driver to grab. The big difference is the hassle of re-keying multiple locks if you want to deny a keyholder access. Getting a lock rekeyed is straight forward. You don't even have to have the lock smith come to your house. Remove the locks, take them in, and a decent smith ...


1

If you lose the keys, or need to give them to someone who you later come to distrust, or post a picture of them on the internet then you'll need to change both locks instead of just one. If this is just two doors, then it's not really a big deal - slightly more inconvenient if things go wrong weighed against slightly more convenience in everyday life. (...


1

If they are just standard doorknob entry sets, I see no reason to key them differently. If you add deadbolts, then those should have different keys. I have often encouraged people to install a deadbolt without a key for additional inside protection but maybe not a good idea if you have small children or a spouse/partner who gets mad easily.


3

This is entirely a matter of aesthetics. In one case the hinge pin (the center of pivot) moves, and in the other it doesn't, but the move is small enough that it's unlikely to cause binding. Just keep that point in mind. Otherwise, do what will result in the shim being least conspicuous. This isn't the ideal way to rectify door alignment, but it is often ...


2

They are basically the same. If the frame is square, you'd be better off planing the door to fit the frame.


39

The difference I have noticed is the spring models are less likely to be pulled from the wall if they are hit by a stray ankle or vacuum cleaner. They will just deflect out of the way and return to the normal position. A disadvantage is some cats find it makes a great toy and will strum the spring for hours.


0

If you want to switch lock styles, plan to switch doors as well. It looks like you could just pull the wood out and the latch will work again. To add lock function, just cut/mortise out a hole in the frame the same size and placement as the deadbolt. If you can find an appropriate plate for the door frame even better. If you were dead set on changing lock/...


3

The spring style cushion the stop so it is not so abrupt. The cushion action reduces wear and tear on the door and hinges but the spring style don’t tend to last as long and they cost more (or that has been my experience)


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