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1

The brass nut piece is in fact your gas shutoff valve. You would have to turn it clockwise to turn off the gas. The engraved line shows the position of the valve: inline with the pipe, the valve is open; perpendicular to the pipe, the valve id closed. Try turning it with more force. Good luck


2

Yes, that appears to be a valve. Note that it can only turn 90 degrees (clockwise as it sits), constrained by the lugs on the side. The line indicates gas flow (in line with the pipe as pictured open, crossways to the pipe closed.) If it requires excessive force to operate, better to have gas shut off upstream and replace it, rather than risk breaking it. ...


3

Galvanic corrosion is a worry only if there is complete circuit. With water pipes, cold water running through the line can make the wood conductive, so you use copper tape with copper lines. Gaslines in the house aren't going to be damp. If you are worried about it, Insulate it. Put two turns of duct tape around the pipe whereever you're going to put a ...


2

Based on the wiki article galvanic corrosion, I would not use copper with iron pipe: Statue of Liberty Galvanic corrosion in the Statue of Liberty Regular maintenance checks discovered that the Statue of Liberty suffered from galvanic corrosion A spectacular example of galvanic corrosion occurred in the Statue of Liberty when regular maintenance ...


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High altitude conversion kits for gas stoves are an actual thing you can buy. The kit decreases the amount of natural gas sent to the burners, because of the decreased quantity of oxygen available at altitude. Here's an installation manual that mentions that not installing the kit where needed can result in incomplete combustion. This will result in CO ...


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