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109

Stop, turn off the gas, ventilate the house, and hire a pro. If you applied teflon tape to a flare fitting, you are NOT the person to be installing your gas range. You fundamentally don't understand what you are doing, and doing this wrong can blow up your house. That tends to impair the "learn from your mistakes" method of learning. This is not the place ...


30

I have had similar problems in the past when running out, what I found is I had to hold the pilot for several minutes to get the lines full of propane again. I found it easiest to light the stove top or try until it would burn then I went to the furnace and water heater it still took a few minutes as the pilot is a very small draw but once the lines had ...


25

Repeating the comments : Do NOT use any pipe dope or tape on flare connections . They are metal to metal seals and anything on the metal sealing surface can cause a leak. Pipe threads (tapered) require dope/tape to get a good seal. I analysed a house fire once and the primary cause was a leak caused by dope on a flare fitting.


13

My understanding of pilot lights is that they heat a thermocouple, which is a mass of metal that detects heat. The electronics behind that thermocouple will shut off the gas to the pilot if the thermocouple gets cold so that if something blows out the pilot you don't have a gas leak in your home. The side effect is that you have to heat up that mass of metal ...


7

The tape you purchased is the correct tape for gas fittings. However, the fitting in your picture is a flared fitting. PTFE (Teflon) tape/pipe dope is only necessary on pipe thread fittings. This is because pipe threads are tapered - as you tighten the fitting, the threads bind together and deform slightly to create a seal. The pipe tape/dope helps ...


7

Open the tank supply valve very slowly and make sure the weed burner valve is closed when you do it. I mean if you think you are opening it slowly you are still opening it too fast. Some of these newer tanks have a safety feature that cuts back on flow if high flow is detected. You may also have a tank with a defective valve, if the above method does not ...


6

Corrugated pipe is generally intended only to be used as the last connection to an appliance, in a living space where it not vulnerable to banging or jostling (usually behind or in a space at the bottom of an appliance), but where it can be seen and accessed if work is being done. It is not intended to be buried in a wall, where it could be pierced by a ...


6

This generally won't work all that well. While both large and small tanks contain propane, the large tank can deliver more propane to appliances than the small one can. Propane is supplied as a liquid under pressure. The pressure in a propane tank is pretty much an indication of its temperature, not the amount of propane in it. When propane is drawn off by ...


6

Everyone else is right. It’s supposed to be a metal-metal seal, so tape won’t do anything. Glue or caulking would not fix it, and trying to welding it or solder it won’t end nicely. Basically, Either the seal or a thread is damaged and you should get a professional to fix it. If not, your leak could not only destroy your home and possibly your neighbor’s ...


6

When I asked our builder and the gas supplier about this, I was told unequivocally no. None of them wanted to get involved in any way in allowing a homeowner to be able to fill a propane tank. I was told that this was a "safety issue". As has been typical, the people I was actually talking to don't know the code chapter and verse and so could not of course ...


5

You need a 3/8" female NPT x 3/8" male flare thread adapter. Any good hardware store or plumbing shop.


5

As others have indicated, there is a very real danger that you have damaged the fitting in an attempt to fix it. Further attempts to fix it can cause things to get worse. And you can solve the immediate problem, but have it corrode or fail over time. Even if you live in an area where you don't have to have a license to work on the gas connection, there ...


4

Use of thread seal tape does not work on the fittings that screw directly into an aluminum propane regulator. I don't know if the changes in seasonal temperature cause the aluminum to contract and expand (or something else) but six months later the fittings will be loose and leaking. I suggest using a hardening compound.


4

The short answer is all you need is a new orifice. The complicated answer is : don't do that. Ventless systems have been banned in various places, and come with significant hazards not fully mitigated by a carbon monoxide detector. Read for instance : http://www.energyvanguard.com/blog-building-science-HERS-BPI/bid/48762/Bob-Vila-and-the-Vent-Free-Gas-...


4

I usually encourage DIY projects, but when it comes to gas applications, I have to strongly caution you to consider using a licensed gas installer to connect an on demand water heater. Nothing in a home is more dangerous than gas and it MUST be installed correctly and pressure tested. Venting the exhaust is extremely important as well, and a mistake can be ...


4

Short answer is, because the 1/2" flexible tubing is short enough to not cause a major pressure loss. If you ran 1/2" line the whole way, it would be too much pressure drop. Pressure drop across a pipeline is a function of all the friction losses added together. These include "major" losses (the official terminology, not mine) from the friction with the ...


4

It sounds to me like a restriction at the regulator, not the control valve. You mentioned that the previous owner had done some work on it, make sure that he/she did not replace the regulator with one that does not deliver the design flow/pressure. In this case, adequate flow/pressure depends on proper regulator back pressure setting (they are rated in "...


4

Pull the oven burner and check for lint or any thing that could partially block the air inlet at the burner venturi. If you can see the flame, It should be blue and have a definite pattern not yellow and lazy. My last home had propane for cooking and the stove required more than normal maintenance. If the odor is a "burn your nose or eyes" kind of odor that ...


4

Those openings are the air inlet. The gas line ends in a small diameter opening that inserts into the burner assembly. The small gas opening causes the gas to flow out at a high velocity, which causes the pressure to be a bit lower at that point because of the Bernoulli effect. So instead of gas leaking out, air actually flows in to mix with the gas ...


3

You'll need to look into your local code to find out if it's approved. Where I live, compression fittings aren't allowed for gas but flared fittings are. If you're not sure, you should contact a licensed gas fitter in your area.


3

When I first read this, my first instinct was "don't", and I think that still holds. You are mixing water, electricity and possibly natural gas in a single untested design, and if anything goes wrong your pool could drain out, you could get electrocuted going in the water, or you could even end up with a bomb. It's not worth whatever costs you'd save ...


3

If the house is unoccupied it's likely "winterized", which may include disconnecting the fuel tank. You'll likely have to contact the home owner or fuel supply company, and make an appointment for them to meet you and reconnect the tank temporarily. DO NOT RECONNECT THE TANK YOURSELF. If you do not own the property, it is not yours to muck around with as ...


3

Where is the tankless water heater to be located? If it is in a space that is heated, then freezing will not likely be a concern as there will be plenty of heat gain through the equipment enclosure. If freezing is still a concern, look for a tankless unit that has a electric element for freeze protection. This will use a lot of energy if the unit is located ...


3

If you are using the standard propane fittings and adapters, nothing else should be needed. Not tape, dope, paste, nor putty.


3

The short pipe you show is a section of tapered NPT black iron pipe. As a sidenote, there should not be pipe dope inside the pipe, the dope should only be on the threads. The section of corrugated pipe is most likely designed to connect to a flared pipe with straight threads. The required two adapters should have been sold with the pipe because it has to ...


3

Call the firefighters telling them that you smell gas, then if there are issues. If FF will find an issue, you'll have the right to ask your company for a fix. Anyway: gas is a bad beast, so call FF just for your own safety.


3

Regardless, put the tank outside. Plumb the house like you would for a huge tank, just bring it to an appropriate enclosure. Put your swappable tank there. Gas pressure is determined by the temperature of the fuel in the tank, mainly the liquid fuel since it has almost all the mass. Large or small tank makes no difference. Piece of bad news though....


3

It isn't normal, and any gas in the room should dissipate fairly quickly. Get yourself a cup of soapy water and a paint brush and find the leak. At the very least your house will smell bad. At worst....


3

MAPP (which is actually a different gas marketed under the old name now) gives more heat than propane without supplemental oxygen, so it's still useable by people without training on mixed fuel torches. The fuel is more expensive than mixed setup, but the equipment cost is much lower; that's a reasonable trade off for something that isn't seeing constant use....


2

You're question is vague and has a couple sub-questions, so let me offer a little Q&A: Q: Are there any central heating furnaces that use propane? A: Yes Q: Can I convert an existing natural gas furnace to use propane? A: Perhaps, but only with a manufactorer-approved adapter. Propane has more energy than natural gas does, so you must not just swap out ...


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