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You need to have a conversation with your power company Those "energy saving boxes" come in two kinds: one that turns off the water heater at certain times... and the other that qualifies you for a lower electricity tariff if the power company can interrupt your water heater at peak times. The first type of box should simply go away. That's because ...


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I don't think this should be a problem, water softeners I have seen do not have check valves in them so water can flow through both ways. It's only after a check valve where expansion capacity is needed. Many homes do not even have an expansion tank, they are most frequently found (at least in my area) where there is a pressure regulator (which contain a ...


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Per the NWS, the [base 65 heating degree days][1] for Washingtion (or BWI, anyway) are 205 for October, 465 for November, 786 for December, 899 for January, 728 for February, 568 for March and 270 for April. What is a "base 65 heating degree day?" a day with an average temperature of 50 degrees adds 15 to the HDD count. A day with an average ...


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Usually the gas pressure regulator is near where the gas line first enters the house. After the regulator is where the gas line will split off to go to your appliance. When the gas company person said the regulator was bad they were referring to this common regulator. It's going bad is why it affected both of your appliances.


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You'd probably be limited to 1/4" copper tubing since the 1/2" would be hard,impossible, to wrap around your drain pipe. You'd need quite a few wraps since the drain water mostly sits /runs toward the bottom of the drain. You could possibly run a larger pipe back and forth along the drain instead of around it. The hassles around fabrication would ...


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Basically none beyond the hassles involved in making it and installing it. While there's a bit of pressure drop from longer piping, it's minimal and can be eliminated, if it would be an issue, by choice of tubing size. There are commercially-produced implementations of this concept, which (as I recall) are optimized for vertical pipe (the supply tubing is ...


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That would depend a great deal on what the internal passages of the particular device are. If they are tightly restricted to control water flow and permit adequate contact time for heating, less restrictive piping to and fro will make almost no difference. You can assume this is likely the case if the sort of hoses used are either supplied with the heater or ...


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To run in parallel, you would need the high temp cutoff on both elements so use two upper thermostats along with bigger wiring and bigger circuit braker. Easily make a faster heating water heater.


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When a tankless is operating, essentially 100% of the energy must go into the water. If even 1% went anywhere else, the unit would self-immolate! And why would it, when it has flowing water to carry heat away. So your question seems silly. But it’s not. The gotcha is standby aka vampire load. The 8 kWh question is, “What is the unit drawing the rest of ...


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The "real world" energy consumption of any electric tankless (lots of big fat wires and breakers) will almost directly match the amount of hot water you use, at what temperature, and what the water temperature of the supply is - they are nearly 100% "efficient" in that power going in is used almost entirely to heat water going out. ...


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You have qualified your question to just Electric On-Demand water heater. Most energy efficient is not necessary the same as lowest cost when evaluating different energy source. I do not believe you will find a source that meets the “"real-world" energy consumption of different electric tankless water heaters under different conditions. Any ...


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40°F is above freezing, so freezing shouldn't be a problem. If the weather is getting cold and you're concerned that this utility room might dip below the freezing point, prop the door open a bit to allow some heated air in. Also, since this is an apartment, talk to your landlord about your freezing concerns and ask him to address the issue - maybe adding ...


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If you're handy with a soldering iron, I would suggest at a minimum that you replace the wire with a new piece with the appropriate thermal rating. Ideally, replace the whole igniter module. As noted in the comments, you may want to determine the cause of the melting so you can fix it so it doesn't happen again.


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This is, in my experience, nearly always an indication of leaks in the system, so make-up water is being added by the boiler feeder (adding new dissolved air) or, if the boiler feeder is shut off, air gets in after water leaks out. In a system without leaks, once the dissolved air introduced with new water is removed there should be no further need to bleed ...


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