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It should work still. Just make sure not to overtighten when replacing if it is a glass lined tank.


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Flip the breaker and let the tank cool down. If the water stops dripping your problem is probably the thermostat. If it just slowed down it's probably time for a pressure relief valve. Sometimes the seats in the pressure relief valves get some corrosion. Try flipping the little lever a couple times. Please be careful, moving the lever will cause a ...


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if the water is dangerously hot it's probably the thermostat that needs attention , if it's warm or cold probably the valve itself or the pressure regulator.


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If your temperature setting on the thermostats are at decent levels, then you either have a faulty "hi limit" switch on your top thermostat which would have to then be replaced or your pressure relief valve is faulty. If I had to guess based on experience, I'd say it was the thermostat. The bi-metal strip in the thermostat is more likely to get out of wack ...


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All backed up The primary problem with your setup is that what you have right now is a sanitary hazard, as there is no air gap preventing sewage from backing up into the T&P discharge line. A standard water-softener or standpipe type air gap fitting can be used for this task, though, and is inexpensively available wherever plumbing supplies are sold. ...


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D'oh - Problem solved. Heater drain valve was not opened sufficiently, due to unfamiliarity with the new-style plastic collar-operated drain valve. The key clue was the rise in indicated pressure, which showed that there was impedance into the tank. With the valve correctly opened, there is no rise.


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This veers towards being "a matter of opinion" but you would seem to be of a mindset where a "heat pump waterheater" and perhaps "yet another minisplit for the family room" would be most suited to your direction of progress. An oil boiler which is not heating much of anything but your hot water has a lot of "standby losses" - i.e. keeping itself warm while ...


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Turn your 80 gallon up to 150. Sounds like one of the burners is also out. Go ahead and replace both if one is out.


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I had that exact problem at the house I previously lived in. It started when the water company installed meters & check valves. Before then, any expansion in the water heater would simply push a bit of water back into the distribution system. After the installation of the check valves, the water heater pop-off valve would even release a bit of hot ...


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If you get a burst of water flow which seems like an over-pressure, it may be time to replace the pressure reducing valve in the water supply line.I would put a pressure gauge on the cold water. Then run the water for a few seconds until the pressure stabilizes in the line. Stop running water and see if the pressure gauge rises as I suspect it will. You can ...


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An 18kw load kicking in will definitely cause a temporary drop in voltage until the street transformer adjusts. You see it even with the air conditioner. That suggests with this new load that the utility company might need some new equipment. You need them to monitor the voltages for a period of time to verify this. Other item of concern is seen in one of ...


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18KW is a 75 amp load at 240volts , which is a HUGE addition in draw for a very small house. For comparison, if you replaced a tank type water heater they typically have 2 4,500 watt elements but only one is on at a time for a current draw of just under 20 amps. You say you ran 8 gauge Romex, I assume that's 2 runs one for each 240volt breaker. LEDs esp. ...


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I called the gas utility this morning and arranged for a field rep to come out and inspect the new setup. He was satisfied that the branching and combination of the gas lines leading into the water heater was fine albeit inelegant-looking solution. He noted a code violation in the way the plumbing contractor had fed the new flexible branch line through a ...


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The first thing to ask yourself is this: do you want this solution to work, or do you want the job "done right?" The builder doesn't have to tear out the 1/2" line -- it could be abandoned in place. He would have to install a new section of properly-sized tubing, though. Consider whether you're willing to deal the logistics of that. It'll require cutting ...


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I would turn the water heater to pilot if you turn the water off, pilot will keep a small amount of heat there and unless it gets crazy cold would help prevent freezing. I grew up in that area and rarely will it get cold enough to freeze pipes inside the house even if you turn the heat way down, I never recommend turning the furnace totally off as that can ...


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Interesting question. I had an initial guess as to why this might be, and in the process of convincing myself, ie testing whether the guess holds up under inspection, I discovered a curious thing. The Water Heating Basics page at hot-water-heaters-reviews.com explains that First Hour Delivery equals (tank capacity) * 0.7 + (recovery rate). When I tested the ...


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From the comments, it appears the PRV failed, likely with a slow leak on the valve. A good way to test for this is to shutoff the hot water tank, close all valves in the house while monitoring pressure over time. If the pressure slowly climbs even without the hot water heater running then replacing the PRV would be my next step.


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It could be due to a backflow prevention valve somewhere downstream the expansion tank. This BPV must be upstream the expansion tank, if the expansion tank is upstream of the heater. I.e., there must not be any blocking device between heater and expansion tank. Sometimes the BPV is only a small insert in the connection of another device/valve, not to be ...


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NEC 240.4(D)(5) Limits #12 copper to a maximum circuit breaker size of 20 amps. So if that existing wire is used then the breaker needs to be changed. NEC 422.10/422.13 Requires storage type water heater circuits be rated at 125%, so that breaker can only accept a water heater rated at a maximum of 16 amps. Watts are calculated Volts x Amps = Watts, so ...


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You really need to tell us what water heater you have now and what it will be replaced with. We can't really answer your questions without such data. You indicate you have "3000 watts with a max amp of 18.75". I don't get it. Most water heaters run on 240V, 3KW would require 12.5A. 120V (if such exists) would require 25A. 18.75 is neither. Most electric ...


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The installer's language sounds like the standard platitudes they give people to get them to drop the subject. You can't put a 30A breaker on a 12 AWG feeder cable, except for certain very arcane motor applications where the data plates from the numbers support it. There is a new type of water heater which is basically an electric motor. This is a ...


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Rise boiler temperature to over 60°C, also ensure that the recirculation pump does not run too fast (or your hot water mains will act as crawlspace heaters). The other option could be that your new boiler is slower to recover: the heat-pump kind is more energy efficient but really slower to recover. You could address it by setting higer temperature on the ...


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Draining up does not work The T&P valve drain pipe is no different than any other drain, in that it relies on gravity to function at the end of the day. As a result, your builder's completely bizarre installation needs to be removed and redone, as you show in your pictures, as it violates several of the operative points in IRC P2804.6.1, including ...


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High probably you have non-insulated pipes or components in the area of the vent system. If you do not want completely and professionally remounting the hot water pipe, you have various ways to reduce the heating of the air: Insulate the hot water pipe as much as possible. There are suitable foamed insulations that can be easily pushed over pipes. But you ...


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