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0

Actually, it was a faulty door sensor. the computer would see the doors staying open and kill the fan. Not how I'd do it, but I didn't design the thing... –


4

You bought it new a year ago, and the manufacturer appears to have a decent warranty. Contact them. Any "taking it apart to fix it" is likely to interfere with the proper warranty process. For reference, it's probably something wrong with the motor; you can confirm by using a cardboard tube or the like to focus on specific areas of the treadmill.


1

Widen your search for cordage They're not all straight-down 90's (maybe in that store or vendor). You need any appliance cord that is of sufficiently large ampacity - e.g. 12 AWG is a little excessive for a cord with a NEMA 5-15 plug on it, but it assures legality/safety (nobody can argue with it. The cordage must be SJOW, SJOOW or any of about a dozen ...


2

Many of these cords are made this way to reduce the stress on the wires inside caused by having the appliances then shoved up against them. There are many cords available which are not made with the 90 degree angle. You just have to go to your store and find them. Here's an example of one from Amazon: They have dishwasher cords similar to this too. Keep in ...


1

I'm still alive and nothing's blown up... yet. After watching this tutorial and calling the shop that sold me the parts, I found out that the reason for the leak was that the flare-end of one fitting was attached to the stove. So I took apart everything, cleaned everything well, and then attached both "flare-end" fittings directly to both ends of the hose ...


5

As others have indicated, there is a very real danger that you have damaged the fitting in an attempt to fix it. Further attempts to fix it can cause things to get worse. And you can solve the immediate problem, but have it corrode or fail over time. Even if you live in an area where you don't have to have a license to work on the gas connection, there ...


7

Most North American style dryers will work on 120V power one of two ways: Make both hots (the same pole of) 120V, neutral is neutral In this case, the 120V equipment on the dryer will work. It is not guaranteed to be this way, but likely it will be the timer, controls, blower, and tumble motor. So it can "air fluff". However, the heat will not work ...


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It won't work. Your 220V (really probably 240) outlets will actually have 0V, not 110V. The reason for this is that normally the 220V outlets make their 220 by taking both 110 lines that are out of phase with each other, such that while 1 is at +110, the other is at -110 for a difference of 220. Since the power company bridged one of the 110 lines to ...


1

Not sure where exactly your are describing your leak is. And I am not familiar with the exact type of flare fitting used in your photo, but down here we typically use gas-rated gaskets to seal the fittings. It is not clear from your question whether this fitting supports it and if it does, whether you have the gasket, but usually it is all that's needed: ...


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