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1

Search "Cadet FW conversion kit". You should find options for you to install a modern Cadet core into your heater frame.


1

It's pretty much the same logic that always, under any circumstances, forbids you to cross a road on a red light. Obviously, if you understand how the traffic is organized and carefully look for incoming cars before crossing, nothing bad will happen. However, if you get a habit of breaking the rules, there will be a risk. The same will happen with extension ...


2

One more important reason: Coiled cable. Because your extension cord is 20 feet and you only need 5, so why not roll the rest into neat circle? Don't. Coiled cable will heat up rapidly with no way to dissipate the energy. Good quality extension cords will have a current rating "when unrolled" and "when coiled" - the second one will be ...


3

One thing that is not explicitly mentioned here is something that used to happen to me when welding at a client site. - we have long extension cables (heavy duty) which easily run the welders. if, when the length is not needed, we leave them wound-up the customer experiences their earth leakage tripping more often, and the cables get much hotter ( to the ...


4

In addition to other good answers, often there usually isn't a perfect zero-resistance connection where the plug fits and holds in the socket purely by friction. If one is using an appliance with a high current draw for a period of time, if any part of the connection gets warm/hot/overheated before the wires themselves, typically its where it plugs into the ...


7

Quite simply, it's the law in most states as around 40 states have adopted the international fire code. The International Code Council (ICC) covers space heaters under the International Fire Code, Section 605.10.1-4. The code lists under what occupancies space heaters can be used, it specifies that only listed and labeled portable space heaters can be used, ...


9

Lawyers, pure and simple. When you start a fire with an electric heater plugged into an exension cord, even if the extension cord is massively over-adequate and properly protected from damage, you were "violating manufacturer's instructions" and they are off the hook, legally, even if the fire had nothing to do with the extension cord. It's "...


4

The common failure mode I am familiar with is plugging two (or sometimes even more) heating appliances in the extension cord sockets. The problem is, breakers don't react quickly to mild (e.g. 2x or 4x) overloads. This is both a technology limitation of the traditional fuses and an engineered feature of the newer electronic protection devices - in order to ...


26

Well, you really nailed it. It's the fact that normal everyday garden variety extension cords are usually 16 AWG, or maybe 14 AWG if you're lucky. The reality is, an extension cord, properly sized for the load, would pose no safety issue, other then potentially being damaged from grandma's proverbial rocking chair, but then again, we have AFCI breakers to ...


17

In addition to the already stated "shouldn't use a flimsy little 18 gauge extension cord", which would have a definite overheating problem, two specifics come to mind: Tripping Tripping over an extension cord is a real problem. Tripping over a cord that then moves a hot appliance into a dangerous position (on clothes or curtains etc.) is far ...


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