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The one place that I lived at where it had a heat pump did have a auto-stop on the compressor so that it would not run below freezing temps. If the temp dropped while the compressor was running, you would hear a hissing sound when it would shut itself off. I grew up with gas heat so there was always hot air blowing regardless of the outdoor temp. I ...


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Consider a lunos or a couple lunos. https://foursevenfive.com/lunos-e Do you humidify in the winter? If so you might want an ERV core. What are you hoping to achieve with the HRV/ERV? In a tight house an HRV runs all the time doing .33 ACH to remove VOC, moisture, etc.


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Even bleeding the systems won’t normally stop the clicking & creaking as the pipes heat and cool the pipes expand and contract causing the majority of the noise, on steam systems there are DA tanks that remove the air , it sounds like normal expansion noise to me , I would not experiment at bleeding a system until I knew if it was a hot water or steam ...


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This is no time for "amateur hour" The problem with drunk-stumbling around this job is that many actions are irreversible and will block more effective efforts at cleanup. That includes: Application of any sort of sealer or barrier coating. Most of the time when people try this, it does little to improve the problem. However, it will "seal it" against ...


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The smell comes from the volatile compounds in the oil getting into the air (the smeller) and making it to the nose (the smellee). Addressing this in some way will address the issue and these solutions fall into two main categories noted below. You might want to choose a combination from these two groups as your solution Fool or protect the nose (stuff ...


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Since you were able to remove the sealant with a putty knife I would believe it failed and allowed some of the fuel oil to penetrate into the concrete. I use hydrogen peroxide for mold and mildew and as a sanitizer but have not heard of this use. when cleaning concrete I use muriatic acid and water, the muriatic acid etched the surface of the concrete , if ...


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I wouldn't do a "controlled burn". If the oil penetrated deep into the wall structure. You could create more problems than you have already. If you want to plaster the walls and protect the new plaster from the oil on the walls, for belt and braces I would use an oil based paint and cover the affected areas in the paint. If you are not sure how much of the ...


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There's an easier way to do this Your first issue is that you are using the domestic hot water as your buffering medium, which forces several constraints on your original proposal, including the need for two heat exchangers connected in series, as well as having to keep the tank at or above 135-140°F to keep your tank from turning into a Legionella nest....


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Depending upon how sophisticated you want to get, I see a number of potential issues. Sizing of everything is very important. This should be engineered. Here are some of the potential issues: the heat pump might not be able to supply enough heat during high demand periods like very cold outside and ppl taking showers. The supply temp to the floor is ...


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Spray foam may be hazardous to the health if the chemical reactions are not finished due to wrong application, dry air, too thick layer. And of course, a good protection is needed during the spraying work. A ventilated air layer is sometimes part of insulation constructions in order to get rid of moisture, depending on the location of the layer, location of ...


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Less likely, but mold can grow also next to/on Fiberglas insulation, since there is always some organic matter in the air and on building materials. It is more a matter of due point, drying time, damp diffusion etc. Here is a reliable way to get all necessary information: Just input each layer into the professional "Ubakus"-Site, which is free for private ...


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Fiberglass itself will not support mold. Mold needs 3 things: Mold spores Moisture Organic matter (i.e. food) With fiberglass itself you have #1 and #2 but are missing #3 since fiberglass is glass and not organic. Note that paper backed fiberglass insulation adds the organic matter component but most is treated to inhibit mold growth. Check with your ...


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This question could get flagged as opinion based but here goes anyway. I live in South Florida and have been in hundreds of attics with fiberglass insulation and have never seen any problems. Yes, there is a lot of humidity but if the attics are vented with soffits, etc., then the humidity doesn't cause a moisture problem. I had a roof leak and some of my ...


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Yes! It sounds as if you probably have the answer to your question. The boiler is on your side of the house. The heat supply lines run under the floor on your side. Depending on how well insulated the lines and your floors are you're probably benefiting or sweltering in the heat your tenant is calling for when they crank up the thermostat. If the basement ...


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If you use anything Use foam, fiberglass gets its R value in the volume. The block wall actually has an R value, I think when I poured my shop walls there was foam on outside and inside and I think the wall was rated at R 50. Since you have a solid wall I might just have an air space. As 1” of foam is expensive for the R value and the air space is actually ...


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