New answers tagged

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There are 2 types of heat tape the self regulating type can be in open air and even cross over itself. This type changes its resistance based on temp so it won’t overheat. The current based type more similar to lots of small resistors creats heat and depending on brand most can not handle non contact or wrapping on top of itself. I would verify what the ...


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This is a simple question requiring a complex answer...! What you are asking is the cost-benefit tradeoff of installing a heat exchanger. How much will you save on heating costs, vs what does it cost to purchase and operate the exchanger. And you wish to compare that to forced air ventilation. Factors to consider: Required or desired ventilation rate, usu. ...


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In my son's new build, he did a lot of research on HRV bc his is a hyper energy efficient new home. He selected Lunos modules (made in Germany, I believe). The American source is linked below. They are pretty pricey! I know this borders on a product recommendation, but just wanted to share what he found. I installed them. They have 3 speeds and 2 modes ...


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This is an old question, and I will try to give the old best answer. The point at which water is connected to the heating system is known as the neutral point. This should be on the return to the boiler, and be the nearest connection before the return from the system enters the boiler. Some systems have open vents, which are run to above a small (feed and ...


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The key is that this is not "freezer" but "side-by-side refrigerator-freezer". In theory, at least, a simple freezer left in below freezing conditions will just freeze. Actually, not quite that simple, because a residential freezer ideal temperature is 0 degrees F, not 20 degrees, but if it simply quit working, 20 degrees would keep ...


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At this point my best understanding is that "EK" doesn't refer just to a pipe thread but more specifically to a specific set of fittings used to mate a tube to a threaded device. The thread standard is just one part of what EK20 means. Here's an example EK20 fitting, used to attach a PEX tube to a manifold: The internally threaded female hex ...


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In my personal experience, this is most often caused by a section of the pipe loop in question being frozen. Tends to be aggravated if there's a setback (automatic or manual) at night causing a long "off" time when the weather is particularly cold, or a woodstove causing a long off time for the boiler. Having a "time override" on the ...


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It will be perfectly fine. The internal control and safeties of the heater will prevent most bad™ things from happening. A smart thermostat will come preprogrammed with reasonable defaults for hysteresis and min turn on. One additional thing you should consider adding is a CO detector, which will alert in case the unit starts emitting the toxic odorless and ...


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If the water is still hot enough, the control system would not start reheating it. There is a hysteresis involved. Explosions should never be a problem, if safety standards are followed. The redundant devices are: Safety thermostat which interrupts the energy input (switch for electric systems or oil burners, valves for gas) at a level below 100 degree ...


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Yes, my “Ductulator” says a 12” diameter duct (with insulation on the exterior of the duct) is a little small, but barely adequate for a 2 ton unit. If I was sizing it I’d use a 14” diameter with a friction loss of .09 per 100 feet of duct on the SUPPLY side and .07 on the RETURN side. However, your 12” duct will make the air travel a little faster than ...


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It sounds like a safety circuit is telling your furnace not to turn on again until it is serviced. A dirty air filter can be the cause, your control board usually has LED’s that indicate what the fault is by a sequence of flashes. It is best to find the cause of the fault not just powercycling. The brand and model of the furnace and the sequence of flashes ...


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Unless you notice water leaking somewhat noticeably from either radiators or around boiler/piping it is not the heating system. Closed loop works like.. amount that leakes out gets automatically topped up by autofilling valve. Lose a gallon it will add a gallon... though the valve is actually activated by the drop in pressure caused by loss of water in ...


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If you are not in the Southern hemisphere, wait 4-6 months and do this in the off-season for heating, not in mid-winter. It's major surgery and requires shutting down and partially (at least) draining your boiler, unless somebody put in WAY more valves than is usual. Shut down the boiler Turn off the water supply to the boiler, if it's not nomally kept ...


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There's no free lunch. Really. Saying a heat pump is an over-unity engine ignores why it works: It takes something from something else; i.e. it creates an externality. Ignoring those is a common error of over-unity believers. Heat energy is the level of excitation of atoms. It generally stores on a per-atom basis not a per-gram basis. What's relevant there ...


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Turn off the electrical power to the furnace and then take the blower door off the furnace. Reach into the blower in the end opposite the motor and try to wiggle, lift or other wise move the blower fan up and down. if it moves up/down you could have worn motor bearings. If it doesn't move then try as @George Anderson wrote. If this is an older unit the ...


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Fit the new boiler where you want. As part of the job get the plumber to flush the pipes to remove silt. The boiler does not have to be central - the pump provides the push for the water and heating circuits have balance valves to control the flow or they can be fitted. But consider if the existing boiler still works, how long is the cost of fitting going to ...


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Without sounding demeaning or condescending countries don't all have similar laws and standards that industry must abide by in which to protect their citizenry. What one Eastern country's government dictates as "safe to use" for the consumer may differ radically from a similar company in the West. Indeed, industry standards may further differ in ...


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Probably paint on the outside of it off-gassing something. Set it outside and run it on high for a few hours, that might help burn the volatiles off. Most are too convoluted to expect removing the paint to be practical.


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My first thought is that the the wires are hooked up incorrectly. Pop the cover on the thermostat and look at the labeling where the wire to the furnace attaches. Do the same at the furnace end. This may make it clear. Second step: Check the installation manuals for the furnace and the thermostat. If you have 12v control for the heat pump, and the furnace ...


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