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Possible fire hazard!? Most likely more important then the asked subject: The area of the 2 left contact screws of the double breaker with red handles just above the quad breaker seems to be molten resp. overheated. The breaker must be switched off and replaced, all connected devices must consume not more then 20A in sum - unless a load shedding relais is ...


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Answer pending verification of photo... It looks like someone may have been using that dryer outlet for a large 120v appliance, probably with some homemade adapter. In your picture it seems like both the red and black wires are attached to the upper screw on that double pole breaker. This would put them both at 120v to ground, but zero volts between each ...


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Using a washer probably isn't a good idea. The screws on those terminals are critical and must work exactly right. The tightness of those screws makes the electrical connection secure and keeps it secure over months and years subject to heat, humidity, and vibration. If that connection is loose, it is not safe. You might be able to figure out what's ...


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If not violating local codes, there might be a solution via load shedding relais, which avoids parallel use, what should be no problem in this case unless both the electronic control systems - if any - of the units are incompatible. The unit having lower prioritization must be compatible, since only that unit will be shut on/off via the relais or contactor. ...


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If it looks like dryer vent (location location location & size) & it smells like dryer vent (gets hot and wet when using the dryer) & quacks like dryer vent (you hear it, and its hot and wet, and it vibrates) ..... It is a dryer vent. There are many posts on this forum and threads online where contractors have improperly used PVC for dryer vent....


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OK, so you have 4-prong wires in your walls that go from the service panel to where you want your dryer. Currently it has a 60A(?? surely 50 or 40A??) breaker on one end, and a NEMA 14-50 range receptacle at the other end. You want to make good use of those wires. Is the 60A breaker not for a subpanel? First, do an exhaustive search for a subpanel ...


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Your dryer installation instructions, which are part of the UL listing, will tell you the plug/receptacles/breaker you are allowed to use. Normally NEMA 10-30 or NEMA 14-30 are the 30A receptacles allowed, which both are limited by the NEC Table 210.21(B)(3) to a maximum 30A breaker.


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So long as you're not removing a stud or part of a stud, you should be fine. Just punching a 4" hole through sheetrock, insulation, and the outside covering (brick, vinyl, aluminum, etc) will not compromise the structural integrity of the wall.


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Everything is good now, barring some serious electrical f-up back at the breaker box's neutral bar. The bare lead was indeed a ground, which I couldn't discern without removing the old outlet. Continuity from neutral to the bare copper checked out, I wired a 240 volt grounded outlet (an NEMA 14-30R type) in its place, replaced the cord on the dryer with a ...


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