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They're under totally different codes. Pole lines up to your weatherhead comply with NESC. All installed wiring in your house complies with NEC. Appliances and equipment comply with the UL "White Book", a whole family of UL standards for various products. UL = Underwriter's Laboratories. Laboratory = testing lab. Underwriter = insurance company. ...


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Sure, manufacturer have different rules on the gauge of the wires in equipment, there are tables in the code book that give tables for wire sizes within the machine panels and the ampacity when the wire exits the piece of equipment these values do not have the safety factors like the building code requires because inside the equipment panels higher ...


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You don't list the type of generator you are planning on using. Some will work on gasoline / propane. One point people often overlook is the amount of power the generator can handle. Generators will frequently be listed as 4,000 watts or 5,000 watts. It's important to remember that is the maximum wattage and not sustained wattage. If you calculate out all of ...


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The question about generators is always how much inconvenience are you willing to accept. If "The goal is primarily to keep the lights/heat/water running" A 7.5k will get you by with minimal management. If you want the lights to blink nothing changes but a call for more fuel when the generator turns off a 30k might work. Or not. As you see in ...


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Let's look at your loads. Your furnace loads are fairly minimal; you can look at the nameplate data but water is easy to circulate. 600 watts wouldn't surprise me. Your refrigerator requires about 120 watts when it is running. Overall it needs about 1 kilowatt-hour per day. Your freezer requires about 120 watts when running. Overall it uses about 0.7 KWH ...


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Forget about buying this thing. It's an "impulse buy", and that does not work for engineered products like whole-house generators and automatic transfer switches. It's an Automatic transfer switch It has a sequenced system which will automatically spin up the generator and then throw the loads over onto the generator. With an ATS there is a simple ...


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TL;DR I don't know of any generators that run on oil as a fuel source. Gasoline, propane, and natural gas are most common. If this generator is supposed to kick on automatically then propane or natural gas is preferred since the shelf-life is so high; 30 years for propane. If you run your current desired load full-tilt then it will consume ~3.2 gallons of ...


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You are looking in the wrong part of the code for the location. Article 445 is about Generators, you will find the location answer in 445.10 for the location. For the load it depends on if you are using a manual transfer switch or an automatic transfer switch. Generally a 22KW Generac Generator operates with the use of an automatic transfer switch, due to ...


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