8

Maybe there was a drywall patch and this is a back brace? From your description, it appears that trimming this piece will do no harm (and a lot of good). The easiest method is to use a multitool. There are numerous good brands, and they come with a variety of blades and other attachments. These versatile tools make cutting, sanding grinding in tight ...


5

A horizontal board between two studs is typically fire blocking. The idea of fire blocking is to prevent a cavity in a wall more than 8' high where fire can quickly spread. You'll see this in any room with over 8' ceilings. For it to work properly, you can't have any gaps allowing air to go from the lower cavity to the upper one. This means any gaps need to ...


4

A proper electrical box is the only way to do this. You CANNOT simply cut a hole and pass the wires through. Any and all line voltage (120/240V and up) splices must be in an approved box and be accessible, meaning you cannot bury a junction or splice box. I could cite all sorts of relevant codes but I don't think that's necessary. This should be obvious. ...


3

If you hit a joist, you can use a 1/2" round junction box designed specifically for this issue (drywall is usually 1/2" thick). Make sure to find one that's designed to support the weight of the fan. E.g. this one will handle ceiling fans of up to 70lbs. When you install this, you screw directly through the back of the junction box into the joist, so there'...


3

You should have at least three choices: A fan-rated pancake box. This is a low profile box that is about as deep as your drywall is thick. If the joist passes through the center of the hole, you can simply screw the box to the joist and hang the fan from the box. The pancake box is small, so you might not be able to make the connection inside the box. ...


3

Based on your description, I "see" the ceiling cut out, a resin disc screwed to the joist. The disc has two or more empty holes that correspond to the device mounting holes in a standard octagonal junction box. Then there's a length of romex cable just hanging loose to which you're supposed to connect the fan. If your fan's installation instructions ...


3

I would recommend cleaning the knockouts first. Sand them completely free of any paint or rust. Then scrape clean the circular groove of the knockout on both sides using a sharp pointed tool like an awl. After doing this, the knockout should come out with a sharp block from a ball peen hammer and screwdriver. If this does not work, the next step would be ...


3

You are sunk Wire that short can't be spliced or extended. The wire must be able to come out beyond the surface of the box at least 3". You will need to reroute these cables to a different junction box somewhere the wiring is able reach with the needed spare length inside the box. From there, you can run a /2 w/ground cable to this location, e.g. NM or ...


3

I'd use a push-in splice like this one. It should attach to your existing wires and let you attach another piece to bring up up to a better length. As for size, you can't go wrong with 12 gauge. It will work with 20 amp and smaller.


3

Consider surface mount boxes. These are designed for line current, but are fine for low voltage. Just swap out your connectors and faceplates. They can mount over an existing old work box and have side access for raceways. Usually they require the same brand raceway to align properly. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods ...


2

If the clamp breaks off, strictly speaking, the box is trash and should be replaced. In practice, there's usually a little latitude. (I prefer metal boxes.)


2

Yes, an old work box is completely safe for what you're using it for. Just make sure the dogs are snug against the drywall.


1

I've used lots of old-work boxes of various designs and love them. When you have a heavy fixture, you need one that will support the weight (by being secured to studs or joists), but your vanity light is.... well, light.


1

The holes in the plaster ears of the box will take screws very well. That is what usually holds the box in place when it is mounted in a cabinet. To allow the cover plate to set well, you could use 4 gauge screws or a larger diameter and countersink the holes in the mounting ears a bit to help let the receptacle set tight to the face of the box. You would ...


1

A simple 2x2 cut and then mounted to wall so the table half will rest on it. Then from the underside of the 2x2 attach the table with screws that will pass through the 2x2 but short enough they will not go completely through the table top.


1

I use a standalone humidity reducer in the wettest room of my house. I've used one in a finished basement too, when it got too damp down there we ran it. For about $100 USD you can get a decent dehumidifier that plugs into a regular wall socket. It works by pulling water from the air. They also produce heat, which will raise the room temperature a little ...


1

One possible investigatory tool is a "toner" set - Fox & Hound or some other brand - While they are are more often used on telecommunications cables, some do claim to work on power wires. User reports vary, possibly due to different toner sets working more successfully than others with power wires. They work by one part applying a small electrical signal ...


1

Why does it need to mount in the MDF? Just put box outside the perimeter of the MDF. But if you insist: From my experience, the simplest and cleanest way to do this is to mount the box in the drywall. You can either put a box extender in the MDF, or cut a hole big enough to clear the whole faceplate. I typically prefer cutting a big hole for the faceplate ...


1

Do not cut the pipe. It may not be electric but water or gas (it looks like it may be black which is standard for gas). A much simple approach is to drop a new line from the box behind the current sconce. This box obviously has one always on circuit. You can tap into this to run another circuit down the wall to a new outlet. You also can add a pair of ...


1

As long as the board is not attached to anything I would attempt to split off a section of the board that is 1/2" to 3/4" wide. You may be able to hold a wood chisel in position via a vice grip pliers clamped tightly to the side of the chisel blade. Then use a hammer to tap on the vice grips outside of the hole. An alternative would be to drill a small hole ...


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