Hot answers tagged

57

Call the utility, ask for a disconnect. Or call the mortuary and pick out a casket. This is not a job for amateurs. Nor for gloves not rated and tested for the voltage. But that's just one tiny piece, so don't think solving the gloves is making you qualified to do the work.


44

You can buy flat Ethernet cables. I'm betting you could get one under the door and still allow it to be closed. Another option is a powerline Ethernet adapter. This is a set of modules that plug into your power outlets and allow you to transmit network signals over them. You run a patch cable from the router to a module in the same room, then plug in a ...


29

Splice connectors such as US-style wirenuts and UK style terminal blocks are demonstrably better in nearly every way to the twist-and-tape method you describe. Wirenuts and terminal blocks are more resistant to mechanical failure due to heating/cooling cycles and the mechanical stress of installation. Wirenuts and terminal blocks are easier to inspect and ...


26

The cables feeding your house are owned by the power company. They own everything from the power pole to the main breaker, which includes the meter. So they will need to be the ones to do the work you describe. It is a legal issue of ownership, not just of safety. Before attempting anything like this you should call them and ask what the procedure ...


14

I believe it is splitting the signal, each output will have a specific loss associated. Some splitters will unevenly split the signal (commonly called a tap), which is handy to give a better signal to a longer run or to the cable modem. You can get a straight through connector at any HI store. That said, even these will have some loss of signal, just no ...


13

Fiber would be ideal, but... Bear in mind that terminating fiber is more exacting and more expensive. It requires special equipment and special skills. You can't just cut fiber with a pair of wire snips and crimp a plug on the end of it. The ends have to be angled and polished, and it sucks when you poke the little fibers in the ends of your fingers, etc. ...


13

Is a stranded wire connection, properly twisted and taped, objectively any worse/better than wire-nuts? I have not found any objective studies that compare a properly-made twisted splice of stranded cable with joins made using a US wire-nut, a UK terminal block or other systems such as the Wago 222 lever connector (and other makers equivalents). Various ...


13

First, call up the power company and consult with them. I gather you have a belief you're holding that says "surely it will take 6 months for them to reply". Challenge that belief. Make sure to mention the insulation failure on the wires. If you can't reach them, give a call to the best electrician you can find and see what they think. For one thing, ...


10

Shopping They sell modular wall plates in 1 to 6 port flavors. Pick up as many as you need from the local home improvement store. Grab some F type modules, and some low voltage brackets while you're there. Installation Cut a hole in the wall large enough for the low voltage bracket to fit. Install the low voltage bracket. Shorten the lengths of cable, ...


9

I have the same problem with the two piece, so I use the compression type. They cost more money, but they are simply worth it. I've never had one pull off. This is the style most cable and satellite companies use. Never use electrical diagonal cutters or dykes to cut cable. They flatten out the end. Use cutters like this. Always use a good cable ...


9

There are a few cons to using tape: I think the most imperitive factor is that a good tape-job is difficult or impossible to verify (an inspector couldn't tell if 3 wraps or 4 were used). Also working on the wires later is often a goey mess, because tape breaks down. And tape is slower to install than wire nuts (time is more expensive than material). ...


9

If the room is adjoining, drilling a hole big enough for an Ethernet cable may not be considered "major damage". If one of my tenants asked me if they could do it I would say yes and consider it normal wear and tear, unless the hole was like 1 inch in diameter or something. If you DO drill through a wall, make sure you don't drill into a power line; if you'...


9

Don't Just coil it up and tape it to the side of the box. Then put the box away, or sell it, depending if you have any future need for cable. The coiling interior to the box to make them work is more complex than it appears on casual inspection, and getting the box tangled so it won't "just pull out" is far worse than having some coiled cable on the outside....


8

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


7

No, the intelligent (budget-concious) solution in this case is to use the cat3 conductors and any of various schemes to run ethernet over them; starting with the base case that 10Mbit ethernet runs happily on Cat3 wire, and many Cat3 wires are actually fine for 100 Mbit. Those are "free" solutions. You could put trunking switches on either end and run a ...


7

There's no good way to repair just that wire, and the adjacent wires are also probably close to failure. You'll need to remove a section of cable and rebuild. Label the cable a ways from this end so you know the orientation with respect to the white plug. As you can see, the cable could be reversed and have the same color scheme. You don't want that or ...


6

GU10 sockets are symmetrical: So there is no need to pay attention to where you hook the live and neutral wires, because the lamp can be inserted either way. As the wiring is AC the main reason to wire it up one way or another is for safety considerations. If you are wiring the switch too, put it on the live wire if possible, so that changing the lamp with ...


6

To answer your questions: "Why doesn't duct tape work for cables? Is it the fault of plasticizers? " - No -- it is more likely that exposure to air dries the glue, causing it to eventually lose its tack and become unstuck. This is also the reason that you're often left with sticky residue, as air was unable to penetrate to the underside of the glue. "Does ...


6

It depends. If it was installed originally, it should be stapled, in which case you can't use it. If it was fished through the wall after the fact then yes you should be able to pull using it. I would recommend pulling polyline first and then pulling the new cable through, along with another piece of polyline. The cable will stretch and break if you ...


6

If you don't run conduit, you won't be able to pull wires with a pull string going through holes in studs anyway. So you might as well firestop them (or run conduit and firestop around the outside of it.)


6

In some (not all, depends on the crimp style) cases you can use pliers (or locking pliers such as vise-grip) to squeeze an "oval" or "flattened" crimp on the long axis, and that will open the hole enough that you can slip the wires out. If not, yes, you have to cut them off, as per the comment that @Steve should make into an answer. If that does work, you ...


6

If you do not know what cross-section or gauge of wire is appropriate for installation in a home or business, you should not be installing it, period. There isn't a single "correct" type of wire to install, instead there are many factors which relate to: Local laws and building codes Amount of current drawn by the appliance(s) Number and type of outlets ...


6

Generally you are better off to remove the problematic section of wire and just solder the unbroken wires to the connector, shortening the cable slightly, rather than try to patch the section which has been bent too much. You can re-create the function of the fancy molded bit where it enters the case with some heat shrink tubing and hot glue. Won't look ...


5

Cable installers work with "live" wires all the time. There's no voltage on their lines that I'm aware of, only signal and maybe some interference. You do need to disconnect lines for satellite dishes or mast mounted amplifiers since they may have a power injector that adds voltage into the lines. When crimping the new cable, make sure the center wire is ...


5

It boggles my mind when folks ask questions like this. How is anybody on the internet, supposed to know what's in your wall? We don't know where you live, what your house is made of, the layout of the house, "10 inches down" from what, etc. Any answer somebody provided would be a guess, at best. The only way to know for sure what it is, is to open up the ...


5

The problems you are trying to solve -- so is everybody else. There are a lot of consumer products on the market aiming to solve the "how do I put my TV here" problem. Their "universal solvent" seems to be ethernet or WiFi. You're saying pre-run all the above wires to an appropriate central place - somewhere a wife would authorize a bunch of tech gear to ...


5

My electrician who is wiring the place suggested that I use one ethernet cable and loop it for all devices, This will not work. Don't do this. Your thought of running a dedicated cable to each place it is needed is correct. In my house, I put 2 cables to each room, connected to a single wall plate with 2 jacks on it. I was in a similar situation as you,...


5

It's difficult to be certain from the image, but it very much resembles this connector: It's a Molex 39-01-2060 connector and lists on the Molex web site as well.


5

Step 1: Bring your router to the demarc point and verify that it works there. You did not mention if you had done this, but if not, you should, as the whole point of a demarc is to say: "If it does not work here the provider needs to fix it. If it does work here the problem is in your wiring." So you need to test that. THEN you can start to concern yourself ...


4

While I agree with the other answer about using a compression tool , and the other tips provided, it sounds like your issue is mainly getting the connector properly onto the coax. With higher-end cable, the connectors usually go on pretty easily, but I've found some cheaper cable to be a bit stubborn. Or sometimes it is cold and your hands hurt and you ...


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