7

Grounding the antenna will actually help prevent lightning from striking it. During a Thunderstorm, anything conductive that is not grounded, will collect a static charge... as the charge builds up, it'll attract lightning to it. So grounding the antenna, drains off any charge that might build up attracting a strike. Also an ungrounded antenna, that builds ...


6

A metal mast should be grounded. At a minimum, use 10 gauge solid or stranded wire run directly to an 8 ft. ground rod. No sharp turns in the wire. You should also have a good surge arrester on your incoming coax or lead-in wire. It, too, should be grounded. If you're able to "bond" the ground rod to the house's incoming utility grounding system, do it. ...


5

Yes- it the number of rods sticking out of the main antenna. 16 on one side 16 on the other side. These rods help remove ghosting, provide a clearer overall signal. They all have their own purpose and lengths are very precise and specific. These should not be bent, extended, shortened or connected to anything else in any way will cause poor signal. Pigeons ...


5

Yes, satellite dishes are frequently powered by DC current over the coax connection. The DC power comes from a "line power inserter" which will attach somewhere to the coax before it reaches the TV's. It may be a single connection or a splitter as well, but either design will connect to an outlet. Edit: As others have mentioned in the comments below, the ...


5

First things first, there is no such thing as a digital antenna, RF does not care whether the underlying modulation is digital pulse, FM, AM, SSB, Chirp or Spread Spectrum. Second, if you live any distance away from the transmission antenna, the more aluminum overcast you have, the more signal strength you receive. Whether it's inside or outside, size does ...


4

It's an antenna / satellite combiner. Appears to be an aftermarket add-on. It takes both LNB feeds from the dish, along with the antenna signal, and combines them onto one wire. In this case, it looks like it fed four boxes. Apparently this unit could combine them without a splitter on TV end. Either way, I wouldn't use it without a satellite dish. A ...


3

At the shed Grounding Electrode The first thing you'll need to do, is to install an approved grounding electrode at the shed. For this answer, I'll assume a 5/8" x 8' grounding rod will be installed. Bond the Mast You'll have to bond the mast of the antenna to the newly installed grounding rod, which you'll do using a 10 AWG copper conductor. You'll ...


3

The amplifier appears to have Belling-Lee connectors (Wikipedia) while the cables look like they have "F" connectors (Wikipedia). Assuming you are in Europe, you should be able to find adapters. If you are in the USA, BL adapters are hard to find but I've gotten them from Radio Shack in the past. Also called PAL or European to F Adapter


3

I've cleaned up after lightning hits an antenna, and designed spark gaps to protect electronics. The last thing I'd do is install a lightning rod through my basement. That stuff should stay outside, irrespective of NEC 810.21(J). Ground loops are not a serious concern in this particular application. I'd also consider changing the 8' rod into two 4' rods, ...


3

Well, if you are going to split it 3-ways, buy a 3-way splitter not a 4-way. I agree with the comment from Mikes about buying a more expensive model if possible. I would avoid a booster at all costs - power boosters add noise to the line - so yes you get a higher signal, but its noisier. As far as minimizing signal loss, here are the top items to keep in ...


3

There are many factors that affect signal strength, some are in your control like antenna placement, but most are not (other buildings/structures, topography, location of broadcast, atmospheric conditions, etc.). If you are trying to find the "best" placement then you need to do a site survey. The crude version of this is using a long temporary cable, ...


3

There's no such thing as a Digital Antenna, the radio wave being intercepted by the antenna doesn't care what it looks like, only that its electrical specs capture the signal. Those fancy cut weird antennas that are made to look digital are just a sales ploy to increase the selling price. You probably need a new antenna with clean connections to the active ...


3

I wondered the same thing when I shopped for an antenna. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a set of specs or a way of comparing antennas from different manufacturers. All I found were reviews but they were all subjective and didn't help me rank one antenna over another, especially when the antennas were from different manufacturers. That's when I bought ...


3

It looks like you have a common RF 4 way cable splitter, with cable coming into through the green wire and 4 TVs (the other cables). You should look at the splitter closely (is this RF or digital; one in and four out?), and determine if I traced the line correctly. If this looks like an RF 4 way splitter, and you want to add an antenna (no more "cable TV") ...


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


2

In antenna design, 'elements' refers to the parts which convert the radiated signal to an electrical signal, so in this case it means the number of metal bars. They are arranged at distances which will increase the amplitude of the wavelengths you want, and generally more elements gives you a greater signal strength (up to a point)


2

Question 1: The FCC has a website that shows digital TV coverage using Google maps: http://transition.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/maps/ They also have a site that shows PDF maps by broadcast area, although I find them hard to understand: http://transition.fcc.gov/dtv/markets/ Question 1b: You want to scan "Digital STD" Question 2: Yes, you need an antenna. ...


2

Over the air (OTA) broadcasts are all digital now, so you will likely want to scan using the Digital tuner option, probably starting with "STD". You likely will need an antenna. antennaweb.org can help you select the proper type of antenna to get the most channels and provide some information on how it should be aimed. I believe that most antennas will ...


2

The antenna should be fine, the frequencies are still the same, it is the format of the information being transmitted that has changed. If that antenna is to be attached to a TV that hasn't been used for 10 years, odds are good that the TV will require a digital to analog converter box.


2

A splitter takes RF power from an input and divides it up between multiple outputs. The splitters are designed to operate at a certain range of frequencies. For cable TV, this might be from 5 MHz to 900 MHz. The important thing to note here is the lower bound, 5 MHz. This splitter would block signals that are below 5 MHz. DC, or Direct Current, is low ...


2

This means that the splitter will allow DC power to pass through from the receiver to the source. This is typically required for satelite TV where the polarity is used to switch the LNB (Low Noise Block) between different bands (if I recall correctly, usually even/odd stations require reversing the polarity).


2

Grounding the mast is a very good idea if it is metal. You can get ground clamps that are designed for use with water pipes and conduit of practically any diameter. They are two curved pieces of metal that have machine screws on either side to clamp to the pipe. There is also a screw terminal for your ground wire. I would put a separate ground rod in, but ...


2

My strategy with satellite dishes was to get the dish aimed close to the final alignment, and then hand tighten the bolts. After this, I used light taps to change the alignment. Once aligned, tighten the bolts the rest of the way. Because the bolts are already snug, I never had problems with the dish moving further.


2

Your TV, sadly, has what is referred to as a susceptibility problem -- it's vulnerable to being confused by electromagnetic trash generated by other gizmos, like air pumps and desktop PCs. From the nature of the interfering devices, it sounds like the electromagnetic trash is being carried from your PC and air pump to your TV via the power lines. My ...


2

The purpose of an earthen ground is not to direct lightning. It's unlikely that you'll have lightning running down a wire routed through your walls, unless you have other more severe electrical problems in your residence. Your home's electrical wiring should have a current earthen ground "somewhere" and all devices using that electricity are conductive to ...


2

No, you will need to isolate the two systems from each other. They cannot exist on the same coax. Unplug lines one by one from the splitter until you locate the modem. That line must be connected to the incoming cable from the cable company. You may need an inexpensive F-Type Coaxial Cable Connector from the big box store to join the two cables. ...


2

You can ground off the electrical ground. Cable companies do this all the time. I would only ground off a pipe if no other options existed. Note: When cable companies do this, they attach a new saddle joint to the ground. Don't connect to an existing block.


2

You haven't mentioned where you live, so I'll answer according to National Electrical Code. First, the lead-in cable from the antenna, must be connected to an antenna discharge unit. This unit is designed to bleed off any static electricity built up on the antenna, to help prevent lightning strikes. The ADU will also have to be bonded to the grounding ...


2

With antennas there are a lot of check boxes to tick. First it has to be installed and adjusted properly. Most TV antennas are directional and need to be pointed toward the TV station. If they are not pointed in the correct direction the signal will degrade. Next the connection from the antenna to the house is important. The two common methods are ladder ...


2

If your system is analog and not digital, the following will apply. If it is digital video transmission, it's out of my league. Analog cable television systems transmit radio frequencies into coaxial cable (simplified explanation) which has signal loss over distance. The lower frequencies (lower numbered channels) will decrease strength at a lower rate than ...


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