8

Yes, satellite dishes are frequently powered by DC current over the coax connection. The DC power comes from a "line power inserter" which will attach somewhere to the coax before it reaches the TV's. It may be a single connection or a splitter as well, but either design will connect to an outlet. Edit: As others have mentioned in the comments below, the ...


7

Grounding the antenna will actually help prevent lightning from striking it. During a Thunderstorm, anything conductive that is not grounded, will collect a static charge... as the charge builds up, it'll attract lightning to it. So grounding the antenna, drains off any charge that might build up attracting a strike. Also an ungrounded antenna, that builds ...


6

A metal mast should be grounded. At a minimum, use 10 gauge solid or stranded wire run directly to an 8 ft. ground rod. No sharp turns in the wire. You should also have a good surge arrester on your incoming coax or lead-in wire. It, too, should be grounded. If you're able to "bond" the ground rod to the house's incoming utility grounding system, do it. ...


6

Good choice on the antenna. Lots of high quality reception for free. In fact, OTA (over the air) TV signals are often of better digital quality than TV through cable distribution. Cable TV is compressed/decompressed one more stage, to reduce the digital data rate, squeeze more channels, and make more money. And OTA latency is lower: you will cheer for a goal ...


5

First things first, there is no such thing as a digital antenna, RF does not care whether the underlying modulation is digital pulse, FM, AM, SSB, Chirp or Spread Spectrum. Second, if you live any distance away from the transmission antenna, the more aluminum overcast you have, the more signal strength you receive. Whether it's inside or outside, size does ...


5

Maybe, but there are lots of details about digital signal processing that are more complicated than just using a reflector. Luckily, one of them is a simple off-the-shelf solution: your antenna. Most consumer wifi equipment uses an omni-directional antenna, so it can receive and send in any direction. For a fixed power you can imagine that some of your ...


4

It's an antenna / satellite combiner. Appears to be an aftermarket add-on. It takes both LNB feeds from the dish, along with the antenna signal, and combines them onto one wire. In this case, it looks like it fed four boxes. Apparently this unit could combine them without a splitter on TV end. Either way, I wouldn't use it without a satellite dish. A ...


4

It can work. It works much better if there are no obstructions in the beam path - using a reflector or other beam-concentrating antenna does not make "the problems with trees and buildings in the way" go away. I have played around with this just using a stainless steel bowl as a crude reflector. For actual deployments, I use real antennas built ...


3

No, you will need to isolate the two systems from each other. They cannot exist on the same coax. Unplug lines one by one from the splitter until you locate the modem. That line must be connected to the incoming cable from the cable company. You may need an inexpensive F-Type Coaxial Cable Connector from the big box store to join the two cables. ...


3

It looks like you have a common RF 4 way cable splitter, with cable coming into through the green wire and 4 TVs (the other cables). You should look at the splitter closely (is this RF or digital; one in and four out?), and determine if I traced the line correctly. If this looks like an RF 4 way splitter, and you want to add an antenna (no more "cable TV") ...


3

At the shed Grounding Electrode The first thing you'll need to do, is to install an approved grounding electrode at the shed. For this answer, I'll assume a 5/8" x 8' grounding rod will be installed. Bond the Mast You'll have to bond the mast of the antenna to the newly installed grounding rod, which you'll do using a 10 AWG copper conductor. You'll ...


3

The amplifier appears to have Belling-Lee connectors (Wikipedia) while the cables look like they have "F" connectors (Wikipedia). Assuming you are in Europe, you should be able to find adapters. If you are in the USA, BL adapters are hard to find but I've gotten them from Radio Shack in the past. Also called PAL or European to F Adapter


3

I wondered the same thing when I shopped for an antenna. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a set of specs or a way of comparing antennas from different manufacturers. All I found were reviews but they were all subjective and didn't help me rank one antenna over another, especially when the antennas were from different manufacturers. That's when I bought ...


3

I've cleaned up after lightning hits an antenna, and designed spark gaps to protect electronics. The last thing I'd do is install a lightning rod through my basement. That stuff should stay outside, irrespective of NEC 810.21(J). Ground loops are not a serious concern in this particular application. I'd also consider changing the 8' rod into two 4' rods, ...


3

There is a lot of miss information out there concerning TV antennas and it mostly caused by marketing hype. Rabbit ears tv antennas made 50 years ago will pick up broadcast from a TV tower broadcasting a digital signal today if it is close enough. There are differences in quality and types, ( directional vs omni - directional- UHF, VHF etc. ). I currently ...


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


2

My strategy with satellite dishes was to get the dish aimed close to the final alignment, and then hand tighten the bolts. After this, I used light taps to change the alignment. Once aligned, tighten the bolts the rest of the way. Because the bolts are already snug, I never had problems with the dish moving further.


2

Most satellite dishes have something called an LNB at the focal point of the dish which is powered. Power for the LNB is from the satellite receiver which is either from a set-top box or built into the TV. It's unclear why you're getting a shock off the dish itself, you shouldn't. It sounds like there is another power injector as indicated in BMitche's ...


2

If your system is analog and not digital, the following will apply. If it is digital video transmission, it's out of my league. Analog cable television systems transmit radio frequencies into coaxial cable (simplified explanation) which has signal loss over distance. The lower frequencies (lower numbered channels) will decrease strength at a lower rate than ...


2

With antennas there are a lot of check boxes to tick. First it has to be installed and adjusted properly. Most TV antennas are directional and need to be pointed toward the TV station. If they are not pointed in the correct direction the signal will degrade. Next the connection from the antenna to the house is important. The two common methods are ladder ...


2

You haven't mentioned where you live, so I'll answer according to National Electrical Code. First, the lead-in cable from the antenna, must be connected to an antenna discharge unit. This unit is designed to bleed off any static electricity built up on the antenna, to help prevent lightning strikes. The ADU will also have to be bonded to the grounding ...


2

You can ground off the electrical ground. Cable companies do this all the time. I would only ground off a pipe if no other options existed. Note: When cable companies do this, they attach a new saddle joint to the ground. Don't connect to an existing block.


2

Your TV, sadly, has what is referred to as a susceptibility problem -- it's vulnerable to being confused by electromagnetic trash generated by other gizmos, like air pumps and desktop PCs. From the nature of the interfering devices, it sounds like the electromagnetic trash is being carried from your PC and air pump to your TV via the power lines. My ...


2

Grounding the mast is a very good idea if it is metal. You can get ground clamps that are designed for use with water pipes and conduit of practically any diameter. They are two curved pieces of metal that have machine screws on either side to clamp to the pipe. There is also a screw terminal for your ground wire. I would put a separate ground rod in, but ...


2

The purpose of an earthen ground is not to direct lightning. It's unlikely that you'll have lightning running down a wire routed through your walls, unless you have other more severe electrical problems in your residence. Your home's electrical wiring should have a current earthen ground "somewhere" and all devices using that electricity are conductive to ...


2

Coax Cable has a particular shielding and is designed for the frequencies that will be carried on it. Your Composite wire does not have that design so your signal will be degraded and quite possibly to the point where you can not get a decent signal.


2

If there's a solar equipment distributor near you, check with them. Products like this exist for this very purpose. Ironically, because you're just grounding the equipment, the conduit itself, if it's metal, can serve as the grounding conductor (so it'd be empty conduit). Look for "conduit roof flashing."


2

So it turns out that this wasn't a signal or hardware issue, it was an air-gap issue. I'd incorrectly labelled one of the cables and ended up thinking both ends of the same cable were different cables (that's what you get running cables behind walls). After discovering this and plugging the correct things into the right places, everything worked as expected ...


2

For that many outlets, you should invest in a "TV distribution amplifier". A search using that phrase brings up many suitable products. You'll be much happier with the results compared to a "tree" of passive splitters. Optimizing the cable runs is a separate question that depends strongly on the physical layout of the house. Per-floor amplifiers might make ...


2

Antennas can build up a sizeable static charge which needs to be dissipated. Unfortunately the obvious solution of grounding the antenna also removes the signal from the wire. A coaxial grounding block allows static charges to dissipate from the center conductor without interrupting the signal. More elaborate devices are filled with a gas which is ionized ...


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