46

You can buy flat Ethernet cables. I'm betting you could get one under the door and still allow it to be closed. Another option is a powerline Ethernet adapter. This is a set of modules that plug into your power outlets and allow you to transmit network signals over them. You run a patch cable from the router to a module in the same room, then plug in a ...


40

The problem with almost any adhesive is that the longer it stays on, the more likely it is to either fall off when you don't want it to fall off, or stay on when you don't want it to (typically this means "top layer of paint comes off with the tape"). Aesthetic considerations may not be an issue right now (when I was a kid, I definitely ran wires ...


38

Ho Le Crap! most of the pics you are showing involved phone service, not in house Ethernet / LAN. Your 6 pin connectors are for RJ16 jacks/plugs (3 line phone service). RJ45 requires 8 conductors and an 8 pin jack/plug. cat5e or cat6 can be terminated on a patch panel, but not a punch down block ("A" in your pics). It can be pretty simple: Connect all ...


32

Same trench is fine. Use conduit, you may want to upgrade it later without re-trenching. Keep some space between the conduits, vertically, horizontally, or both. Interference between 60 Hz power and 100+MHz ethernet is wildly overestimated by numerous people. Ethernet encoding is designed to ignore noise, and ethernet cabling is deign to reject noise so it ...


30

Another option no one has mentioned is to use cable raceway The raceway itself will come with adhesive, or sometimes be nailed into the wall. It's more expensive, but the end result will look much nicer than tape or staples, and be more flexible for future expansion. For even more flexibility, you can terminate it to an ethernet jack: By the way, ...


24

Ah, look, my day job... Step one - if the roof antenna is gone, and you are not otherwise using the existing cables, remove the power injector. It's just wasting power and doing nothing useful, and may be incompatible with whatever you do next. It is at minimum irrelevant, or else it is doing something and you'll notice something like video cameras stop ...


22

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


21

Hmm, when I see your first try then maybe my improvisation-style is sufficient for your needs. If appearence is not critical and money-is-out, instead of using tapes I use my stapler and cut rectangular pieces of card-paper to make a loop around the cable keeping a tongue to be stapled to the wall. The problem of destructive tapes doesn't occur, and the ...


20

Definitely go conduit here I would lay two conduits (one for mains, one for data/telecom) if I were in your shoes; this way, you don't have to dig anything up later to upgrade it. 1" is adequate for most telecom cables you'd want to run; however, while a second 1" will accommodate smaller mains feeders (up to 60A, or perhaps a bit more), I would ...


20

Two options that come to mind: manassehkatz's answer to use cable clips is a great one if you'd like a lasting solution to using a long ethernet cable. I'd like to offer an alternative to having a long running ethernet cable. Powerline adapters! A Powerline adapter is a device which uses your homes electric wiring to transmit communications signals. The ...


19

Answering your questions in order to the best of my ability: Your cabling is currently connected to a telephone style punch-down block. For standard computer networking, I would purchase a RJ45 patch panel instead, and connect each cable to its own patch panel jack. I will defer to other commenters on how to best avoid interfering with telephone service ...


17

Absolutely not. Low voltage (LV) and mains cannot share a conduit. Further, you cannot attach anything else to the outside of the electrical conduit. So forget about ty-wrapping the LV cable to the outside of the conduit...


13

Check your baseboard (what they call it in the US) or skirting board (what they call it in the UK). Typically this doesn't fit completely against the floorboards, so there's a gap between that and the floorboards (to accomodate movement of the floor and/or wall over changing humidity and temperature). If this gap is wide enough, you may be able to slot the ...


10

If the room is adjoining, drilling a hole big enough for an Ethernet cable may not be considered "major damage". If one of my tenants asked me if they could do it I would say yes and consider it normal wear and tear, unless the hole was like 1 inch in diameter or something. If you DO drill through a wall, make sure you don't drill into a power line; if you'...


10

I bought a pro-sumer wifi unit for about $300 on Amazon (Amplifi is the brand and came with 2 repeaters). It's low configuration and self-meshes with repeaters for total coverage. It's overkill for a lot of houses but I have an odd setup and it should cover virtually any house. I offer it here for comparison to the $200 "pro setup wifi". 1000ft of Cat6 is ...


10

You can't use those black boxes. They are for distributing telephone lines, not Ethernet. You have two options. The first is to put RJ45 connectors on the ends of the blue cables. You'll need to buy (or borrow) an RJ45 crimp tool and get some RJ45 connectors. You can crimp on the connectors to all of the blue cables, or just the ones you intend to use. ...


10

You can run cables parallel outside conduit. Ideally a few inches apart but in practice right next to each other is usually OK. But you can't run them together inside conduit. Plus, inside conduit you would be better off for the electrical cable using individual wires (appropriately sized & rated) instead, which is not an option for the CAT6 anyway.


9

No, not a bit. Twisted pair cables are HIGHLY resistant to interference pickup. Furthermore, DC does not cause interference, since it is basically an unchanging current, so there's no change in magnetic fields from it to cause interference (other than when turned on, and off - and the twisted pair cables will reject that interference by design, anyway.) I ...


9

Cat7 connectors are compatible with Cat5, with enhancements and caveats Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7 are physically and electrically compatible. It's when you try to do 10Gb/s or higher signaling on the cable that the Cat5e standard falls over. Even at that, though, Cat5e will do 10Gbps out to 150 feet. The physical connectors for Cat6 and Cat7 cables are ...


9

CAT6, even "unshielded", is very resistant to electrical interference, just as it can carry very high-speed data while emitting little or no interference. Plus, your power cables have pairs of conductors carrying current in opposite directions, so any interference they emit is going to rapidly diminish with distance. (For fun, here is an explanation of how ...


9

That's not "orange/green", it is T568A vs. T568B Cat 3/5/6 cabling can be connected in two "flavors" - T568A and T568B. The cable (without ends attached) is the same and they are functionally identical. The only question is the sequence - Blue/Orange/Green/Brown vs. Blue/Green/Orange/Brown. Most connectors & jacks include color-coding ...


9

Speaking as someone who does a LOT of data cables... Pray to your deity of choice regarding (lack of) lightning nearby. The extent to which I prefer fiber optic for outside data runs is influenced by years of dealing with copper outside data runs, and the failures resulting - but few, if any, cameras are set up for power + fiber optic, so you'll want a nice ...


8

I'm not aware of a tool but I'll give my tips. General Process Strip the jacket 2-3 inches back. Jacket strip tools are great for this:  a knife works but it takes longer and you're more likely to nick a wire (= start over) or accidentally cut yourself. If you're using a boot, install it now. Splay the wires out, unwinding them, and start lining them ...


8

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


8

Pin 6 is not crimped. Your crimp die is defective or you need to try again. All the pins should be at the same level. But really, punch-down into jacks and buy patch cables as already suggested. Cheaper and more reliable.


8

You mean 800.133. And this very concept of mixing comms and power is highly improbable. I know you're casting around for a way to do this, but this sort of "hopeful reading" is very highly prone to confirmation bias. NM-B is always useless in conduit Using NM-B in the conduit wiring method is not illegal, but buys you nothing but headaches. It's very ...


8

I haven't reviewed all your options yet, but the "expansion board" is a non-starter. It's a TELEPHONE expansion board and will NOT work as you expect. You can't just connect computers in parallel like phones. What need there is a LAN SWITCH and all the appropriate re-wiring in your LV panel. Maybe I'll add to this later...just wanted to let you ...


8

I don't know if the exact match you're looking for exists, but you can get decora inserts (for the type of plate in your picture) that fit one, two, or three keystones. It'll be plastic rather than metal, but the plastic will match the keystones while the metal matches the box.


8

Well, if you do normal house/building wiring, you don't crimp plugs on anything, you just punch-down into jacks (one wire at a time) and buy patch cables pre-terminated. That's what a professional job looks like, and there are good reasons for it - one of which is that getting wires into plugs is fiddly, even with experience. Another is that building wiring ...


8

There are plenty of self-adhesive cable clips to be had. I'd go with a low-profile option for the neatest appearance. Be aware that many such items have strong adhesives that will leave residue on paint and/or tear paint loose when removed. I'd be looking for a wireless solution. Wifi mesh kits are pretty darn good these days.


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