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44

You can buy flat Ethernet cables. I'm betting you could get one under the door and still allow it to be closed. Another option is a powerline Ethernet adapter. This is a set of modules that plug into your power outlets and allow you to transmit network signals over them. You run a patch cable from the router to a module in the same room, then plug in a ...


10

I bought a pro-sumer wifi unit for about $300 on Amazon (Amplifi is the brand and came with 2 repeaters). It's low configuration and self-meshes with repeaters for total coverage. It's overkill for a lot of houses but I have an odd setup and it should cover virtually any house. I offer it here for comparison to the $200 "pro setup wifi". 1000ft of Cat6 is ...


9

No, not a bit. Twisted pair cables are HIGHLY resistant to interference pickup. Furthermore, DC does not cause interference, since it is basically an unchanging current, so there's no change in magnetic fields from it to cause interference (other than when turned on, and off - and the twisted pair cables will reject that interference by design, anyway.) I ...


9

If the room is adjoining, drilling a hole big enough for an Ethernet cable may not be considered "major damage". If one of my tenants asked me if they could do it I would say yes and consider it normal wear and tear, unless the hole was like 1 inch in diameter or something. If you DO drill through a wall, make sure you don't drill into a power line; if you'...


9

That's not "orange/green", it is T568A vs. T568B Cat 3/5/6 cabling can be connected in two "flavors" - T568A and T568B. The cable (without ends attached) is the same and they are functionally identical. The only question is the sequence - Blue/Orange/Green/Brown vs. Blue/Green/Orange/Brown. Most connectors & jacks include color-coding for both types, ...


8

I'm not aware of a tool but I'll give my tips. General Process Strip the jacket 2-3 inches back. Jacket strip tools are great for this:  a knife works but it takes longer and you're more likely to nick a wire (= start over) or accidentally cut yourself. If you're using a boot, install it now. Splay the wires out, unwinding them, and start lining them ...


8

Pin 6 is not crimped. Your crimp die is defective or you need to try again. All the pins should be at the same level. But really, punch-down into jacks and buy patch cables as already suggested. Cheaper and more reliable.


7

It looks like this was originally intended for telephone service distribution. There's a few ways to go about it depending on how neat and tidy you want the job to look. You can pull those blue wires free from the termination block, crimp them with rj-45 heads, and plug them into your switch. Quicker, Easier, Cheapest. You can replace the punchdown block ...


7

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


6

The most obvious thing is to get a patch panel designed for a 19" rack or one that comes with an adapter plate. If you have your heart set on using the patch panel that you have then you would be faced with creating something of your own. I believe that the easiest way to do that is to purchase a ready made blank 19" rack panel that is higher than your ...


6

Riser cables are not "fragile", for one thing. 65 of them in a bundle are not even remotely fragile, as a unit, unless "hack with an axe" is your fragility standard. Rack patch panels (punchdown style) are specifically intended to terminate riser (or plenum) type solid cables without the need to put a plug onto the cable (where repeated use might flex the ...


6

Fish Tape A real (and "reel") fish tape is often the tool to use. Because it is flexible and very long (typically 25' or 50'), you can get a lot farther than just fiberglass rods. But it can be a pain to use, depending on the path. Tape to old, pull new, pull back old When you have (as I think you do) an existing cable that you want to keep and want to ...


6

CAT6, even "unshielded", is very resistant to electrical interference, just as it can carry very high-speed data while emitting little or no interference. Plus, your power cables have pairs of conductors carrying current in opposite directions, so any interference they emit is going to rapidly diminish with distance. (For fun, here is an explanation of how ...


6

The stucco clips linked in the question should be OK, as long as they are big enough that they don't damage the cable. Flex Clips are popular with the cable companies you drill and use a plastic anchor with these It is going to sag a bit between anchors, but the closer you space them, the less it will sag. Gluing it would be a mess - I would not ...


6

Given that the "horizontal studs" are fireblocking, you should be applying firestop caulk after you run the wires, which favors access holes and drywall repair. So does the possible/likely presence of power wiring in the wall, and possibly other things like pipes. Blindly poking a long drill bit into the unknown can get very interesting, in the unpleasant ...


5

Yes. It is possible. Keystone jacks almost always have two angled ledges. One stationary upon which the keystone pivots (Red below), and the other spring loaded which 'snaps' into place (Green below). Jam a straight blade in at the blue angle to push the green tab in, and pry it out. In 3by1 and 3by2 outlet plates, it's normal that they are too close ...


5

This depends on whether you are using pre-assembled cables or not. The following images were made using The Engineering Toolbox's Smaller Circle in Larger Circle Tool to find the optimal packing. If using bare cable (No Connectors) Using a 6.5mm (0.256) Diameter cable, you can fit only 5 cables per conduit. However, this assumes the cables are perfectly ...


5

No cause for concern, cat 6 and other UTP network cables are very good at rejecting interference, the relatively low voltage and power of the security system will not disrupt the signal on the UTP. Big, high power sources of interference like arc welders might.


5

Sorry, but I don't think you are allowed to do this. See Cat 5/6 in same conduit as power: is NM-B required, or is THHN acceptable? for more information. So while there may or may not be any actual technical problem, there is a code problem. Would there be a problem running your Ethernet outside the conduit, just inches away? According to code, no problem ...


4

When it comes to data (Cat6) cable it in not so much about the number of wires you can fit in to the conduit, because the more you get in the conduit the more the speed of the information could degrade. I have always put no more then 4 Cat6e in a 3/4in Conduit. So pick the best cable for your job and then the correct size of conduit or run more then one 3/...


4

Cat7 connectors are compatible with Cat5, with enhancements and caveats Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7 are physically and electrically compatible. It's when you try to do 10Gb/s or higher signaling on the cable that the Cat5e standard falls over. The physical connectors for Cat6 and Cat7 cables are still RJ45 plugs, but they're shielded and the standard calls ...


4

You need a LAN Tracer This one is from Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Upgraded-VicTsing-Ethernet-Telephone-Tracking/dp/B008G8KE90 Connect the sender to one end of the cable, and use the tone receiver to track the cable in the wall. More expensive tracers can tell you the length of the cable up to the break - but I prefer the tone, which tells you exactly ...


4

Edit: Snip Tyson already linked Siemons paper. That gives a pretty good idea of the setup. In a nutshell the mechs in the patch panel are earthed via the patch panel to the rack frame which then should be bonded to a communications earth. Not sure what standards are worldwide, in Australia the communications earth is bonded to the electrical earth at the ...


4

Since the electrical wire is in metal conduit, I would have no fear of interference. Just do not attach the ethernet to the metal conduit, as you are not allowed to use electrical conduit as a hanger for anything. Another factor: Most plastics do not like UV light, which the sun emits in great quantity. This could be a serious problem for the sheath on ...


4

For that distance, I'd recommend using shielded CAT-6A cable. We have a similar issue in our church, and over only 150ft we found that standard cat-6 cable lost enough quality that it was noticeable. No problems with shielded CAT-6A (which is designed for 10Gb/s to a maximum of 328ft) 3ft of separation from 120v is plenty for any implementation; I'm usually ...


4

You have not stated any reason that would appear to prevent the obvious solution (if you consider it a problem at all) of running the network wiring along the face of the wall at the same level as the server rack, or roughly 12" below the power conduit. If the basement/crawlspace floods enough to flood the server rack you probably should rethink the location ...


4

My electrician who is wiring the place suggested that I use one ethernet cable and loop it for all devices, This will not work. Don't do this. Your thought of running a dedicated cable to each place it is needed is correct. In my house, I put 2 cables to each room, connected to a single wall plate with 2 jacks on it. I was in a similar situation as you,...


4

Conduit is always a good idea, in my opinion. Network/communications cable is something that has a much shorter lifecycle than a house. It's feasible, just requires application of money. If it's planned in from the design phase, that reduces the cost considerably .vs. retrofitting. A house is not an office building, in most cases, so a single panel with ...


4

Yes, absolutely. The fiber you'll want for this job is "Drop" fiber - it's made to resemble (and work with the hardware for) telephone "drop" wire - and it's relatively inexpensive while being quite robust. While we tend to knee-jerk away from aerial fiber because it's more exposed to damage, this is a perfectly viable solution. However, for most home ...


4

You mean 800.133. And this very concept of mixing comms and power is highly improbable. I know you're casting around for a way to do this, but this sort of "hopeful reading" is very highly prone to confirmation bias. NM-B is always useless in conduit Using NM-B in the conduit wiring method is not illegal, but buys you nothing but headaches. It's very ...


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