46

You can buy flat Ethernet cables. I'm betting you could get one under the door and still allow it to be closed. Another option is a powerline Ethernet adapter. This is a set of modules that plug into your power outlets and allow you to transmit network signals over them. You run a patch cable from the router to a module in the same room, then plug in a ...


41

The problem with almost any adhesive is that the longer it stays on, the more likely it is to either fall off when you don't want it to fall off, or stay on when you don't want it to (typically this means "top layer of paint comes off with the tape"). Aesthetic considerations may not be an issue right now (when I was a kid, I definitely ran wires ...


39

Ho Le Crap! most of the pics you are showing involved phone service, not in house Ethernet / LAN. Your 6 pin connectors are for RJ16 jacks/plugs (3 line phone service). RJ45 requires 8 conductors and an 8 pin jack/plug. cat5e or cat6 can be terminated on a patch panel, but not a punch down block ("A" in your pics). It can be pretty simple: Connect all ...


36

Nope! Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) jacks were usually daisy chained as you describe. Ethernet requires a "home run" from each jack to a modem, router or switch. Also, it's probably cat-3 which is unsuitable for Ethernet. EDIT: Based on comments (which sometimes go away, but answers don't), I'm adding to my answer here: According to others ...


33

There are two issues, one trivially easy, one a big "maybe": Don't Use a Patch Cable Don't use a patch cable. Period. The reason is that patch cable ends break. Oh, I'll just crimp on another connector. Where did the good crimper go (only use it once every 5 years...)? Oops, got two wires swapped, I'll have to try again..., etc. Far, far better to ...


33

Read the jacket - I think I can see, but not make out, faint red printing on at least two of the gray cables in your picture. But there's no guarantee that all the gray cables are the same, if this system grew organically over time rather than having been all installed at once. Even if it's CAT3, it will run ethernet (slowly by modern standards.) That will ...


32

Same trench is fine. Use conduit, you may want to upgrade it later without re-trenching. Keep some space between the conduits, vertically, horizontally, or both. Interference between 60 Hz power and 100+MHz ethernet is wildly overestimated by numerous people. Ethernet encoding is designed to ignore noise, and ethernet cabling is deign to reject noise so it ...


30

Another option no one has mentioned is to use cable raceway The raceway itself will come with adhesive, or sometimes be nailed into the wall. It's more expensive, but the end result will look much nicer than tape or staples, and be more flexible for future expansion. For even more flexibility, you can terminate it to an ethernet jack: By the way, ...


25

Ah, look, my day job... Step one - if the roof antenna is gone, and you are not otherwise using the existing cables, remove the power injector. It's just wasting power and doing nothing useful, and may be incompatible with whatever you do next. It is at minimum irrelevant, or else it is doing something and you'll notice something like video cameras stop ...


23

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


23

I'd suggest that a single cable to bring signal from the entry point to the required distribution point is far "prettier" than a bodge of 27 WiFi access points & signal boosters! Have you considered bringing the cable from the garage to someplace somewhat midpoint in the house - maybe a hall coat closet, or something off the kitchen? Terminate ...


22

Hmm, when I see your first try then maybe my improvisation-style is sufficient for your needs. If appearence is not critical and money-is-out, instead of using tapes I use my stapler and cut rectangular pieces of card-paper to make a loop around the cable keeping a tongue to be stapled to the wall. The problem of destructive tapes doesn't occur, and the ...


21

Two options that come to mind: manassehkatz's answer to use cable clips is a great one if you'd like a lasting solution to using a long ethernet cable. I'd like to offer an alternative to having a long running ethernet cable. Powerline adapters! A Powerline adapter is a device which uses your homes electric wiring to transmit communications signals. The ...


20

Answering your questions in order to the best of my ability: Your cabling is currently connected to a telephone style punch-down block. For standard computer networking, I would purchase a RJ45 patch panel instead, and connect each cable to its own patch panel jack. I will defer to other commenters on how to best avoid interfering with telephone service ...


20

Definitely go conduit here I would lay two conduits (one for mains, one for data/telecom) if I were in your shoes; this way, you don't have to dig anything up later to upgrade it. 1" is adequate for most telecom cables you'd want to run; however, while a second 1" will accommodate smaller mains feeders (up to 60A, or perhaps a bit more), I would ...


20

There is a separate issue of the type of cable. Telephone can run on CAT 3 (10 Meg. ethernet), CAT 5 (100 Meg. ethernet), CAT 5e (1 Gig. ethernet) but also on much older types of cables that are not suitable for ethernet at all. Assuming that the cable you already have in place is at least Cat 5 (100 Meg., which is arguably enough for typical internet usage),...


20

The plastic rectangle at the top is on top of the 2nd screw. Stick a paper clip or a very small screwdriver on the side to push under and bend it slightly and it will pop out. Unscrew. Done.


17

Absolutely not. Low voltage (LV) and mains cannot share a conduit. Further, you cannot attach anything else to the outside of the electrical conduit. So forget about ty-wrapping the LV cable to the outside of the conduit...


17

If you read up on the standards for datacom cabling, you might end up with your head spinning. Those standards are very demanding and detailed. They do make sense for big installations in commercial buildings, hospitals, data centers, etc. But keep in mind, you'll also find tons of material based on partial understanding of the industry standards, and some ...


16

You don't even need a drop. Just put boxes in the ceiling, or just below, and plug in. Your standard 6 foot line cord will reach the "relatively low" ceiling from the desktop, and ethernet drop cables are available in any length you like. Use cord/cable loom to "prettify" the cables if it makes you happier. Alternatively, you know where ...


13

Check your baseboard (what they call it in the US) or skirting board (what they call it in the UK). Typically this doesn't fit completely against the floorboards, so there's a gap between that and the floorboards (to accomodate movement of the floor and/or wall over changing humidity and temperature). If this gap is wide enough, you may be able to slot the ...


12

Simple cup hooks will suffice $5 for a pack of 25. src If screwing into the bottom, then at the first joist, you have two of them about an inch apart, and you face them opposite directions (not like in the photo). That way, to get the cable into them, you have to zig-zag it. This assures the cables will not escape. Then every couple of joists, you have ...


11

Cat7 connectors are compatible with Cat5, with enhancements and caveats Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7 are physically and electrically compatible. It's when you try to do 10Gb/s or higher signaling on the cable that the Cat5e standard falls over. Even at that, though, Cat5e will do 10Gbps out to 150 feet. The physical connectors for Cat6 and Cat7 cables are ...


11

If the room is adjoining, drilling a hole big enough for an Ethernet cable may not be considered "major damage". If one of my tenants asked me if they could do it I would say yes and consider it normal wear and tear, unless the hole was like 1 inch in diameter or something. If you DO drill through a wall, make sure you don't drill into a power line; if you'...


11

CAT6, even "unshielded", is very resistant to electrical interference, just as it can carry very high-speed data while emitting little or no interference. Plus, your power cables have pairs of conductors carrying current in opposite directions, so any interference they emit is going to rapidly diminish with distance. (For fun, here is an explanation of how ...


11

Yes, this will work fine Cat5 is rated for Gigabit Ethernet (1Gbps) for 100 meters / 328 feet. (source: IEEE 802.3ab). Cat5e has more crosstalk resistance than Cat5 and is the most inexpensive network cable available today. It will be more than sufficient for your needs. Cat6 is even better and will work fine too. Another poster said that you need to put in ...


11

You discovered wrong. Ethernet runs at 100MHz and up, your line voltage at 60Hz is virtually DC at that frequently difference. With that said, you should still run your data cables in conduit. Not for interference concerns, but so that in 2040 you can easily replace the cat5 with something new for our 20K ultra VR direct brain video or whatever is the deal ...


10

No, not a bit. Twisted pair cables are HIGHLY resistant to interference pickup. Furthermore, DC does not cause interference, since it is basically an unchanging current, so there's no change in magnetic fields from it to cause interference (other than when turned on, and off - and the twisted pair cables will reject that interference by design, anyway.) I ...


10

I'm not aware of a tool but I'll give my tips. General Process Strip the jacket 2-3 inches back. Jacket strip tools are great for this:  a knife works but it takes longer and you're more likely to nick a wire (= start over) or accidentally cut yourself. If you're using a boot, install it now. Splay the wires out, unwinding them, and start lining them ...


10

I bought a pro-sumer wifi unit for about $300 on Amazon (Amplifi is the brand and came with 2 repeaters). It's low configuration and self-meshes with repeaters for total coverage. It's overkill for a lot of houses but I have an odd setup and it should cover virtually any house. I offer it here for comparison to the $200 "pro setup wifi". 1000ft of Cat6 is ...


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