22

You can't actually use indoor wire underground. The wire or cable will get wet, will degrade, leak, and do really strange things like electrify the ground. There is nothing you can do to keep conduit dry. It will get wet. In legit conduit, normally you use individual wires (THHN). Almost all THHN is dual-rated THWN-2 for outdoor use! Same wire - that ...


18

Stainless steel is the obvious choice. Which exact grade is probably more dependent on what you can easily find than what the "most perfect for the job" grade might be, but 316 or 316L would be high on the list and are quite commonly available. Be very careful about ventilating the tank if entering it "for maintenance" - tanks can be deadly. If the water ...


11

Cable The cable you're looking for is Type UF, or Underground Feeder cable. It can be purchased at big orange, and big blue, by the foot. It's available in 6/2, 6/2 with ground, 6/3, and 6/3 with ground, and is rated for direct burial. Attachment to Service There is one temporary, and two permanent ways to supply power to a park trailer. Temporary Power-...


10

You didn't indicate your location or site characteristics (slope, hillside, etc), but the location of the country, even generally could be helpful, but not required. You indicated the water bill was not high, so it could not be a water leak. That would only be if the leak was after the meter. However, the leak could be before the meter and impossible to ...


9

Check with your utility to see if they have a program to bury your service line. My company (FPL) has a program where they will give you the conduit to bury along with instructions. Once everything is set up and meets their standards, they will bring the lines down the pole for you. There is a fee, of course. For FPL in my area, it would cost around $580 ...


8

I've used a sawzall type reciprocating saw with the 14" long demolition style blades for similar type wood removal in the ground. Be prepared to replace the blade a few times as cutting into dirt can mess up the teeth after a while. With the saw like this you should be able to cut completely through the old timber without having to do any chiseling in ...


6

To add a bit to the question from Pavel in the comments of Ecnerwals answer: Stainless steel structures in swimming pools are known to be prone to SCC. The use of standard austenitic stainless steels like 304 and 316 is forbidden in this application. The best steels to use for this purpose are the high nickel austenitic steels such as the 6% Mo grades. ...


5

The National Electrical Code does not list a minimum cover requirement for communications circuits, so in theory you could put the conduit at grade level. Irrigation control and landscape lighting has a minimum cover requirement of 6" (150 mm), so I'd probably go with that as a basis. Since you're not specific about the electric power circuit, I'll ...


5

Definitely run the largest conduit you can obtain across the driveway. Possibly two or three or four parallel runs -- you don't know if you will eventually want to use one for low-voltage cabling, another to pass a water pipe through, etc. PVC conduit holds up very well underground and is relatively cheap even in large diameters. You can put conduit ...


5

Sure, you can...but as far as whether you should then no. I know its probably not what you're thinking of at the moment but in the future, among other problems, someone digging around in the garden and spotting a buried garden hose might not think of it holding electrical cables. I'd recommend twin walled cable ducting, its not overly expensive and better ...


4

Is there a simple, definitive answer to this? Yes It may seem more convenient to install the wire as you go in a very few cases but the National Electrical Code prohibits it and is quite clear. From the 2017 NEC: 300.18 Raceway Installations. (A) Complete Runs. Raceways, other than busways or exposed raceways having hinged or removable covers, shall be ...


3

You can use most types of conduit outdoors, though some will require liquidtight fittings. Cost wise, and due to the ease of use, I'd recommend schedule 80 PVC conduit. schedule 80 PVC conduit http://static.hardwarestore.com/media/product/636554_front500.jpg As long as you use the proper size conduit and boxes, you can indeed run all the circuits through ...


3

The very likely outcome will be that the structural engineer will go away to do the necessary calculations, specify the requirement for the underpinning to be carried out by a contractor, and the tree will be converted to firewood (tree preservation order permitting). The underpinning will be carried out and leave the building stronger than it was before. ...


3

It turned out to be abandoned electrical. Photos below (cell phone for scale) DigSafe came out and confirmed it was not a City service (gas, hydro, transit, water, etc.) They checked out the line and agreed it was strange it was so shallow; definitely not one of theirs. So we excavated a little more and eventually realized it is not a pipe, but a sheathed ...


3

Do you really need to remove it? If this is in a mild climate, you could simply place the deck pier on top of it and secure it, perhaps by drilling into the tie and attaching with spikes, cable, etc. to get more stability. If the frost level is mid-tie, I think that having the tie partially below frost level is good enough to ensure stability. Otherwise, ...


3

"Black polyethylene" seems to commonly refer to HDPE pipe, which is pretty comparable to PEX. "Just" PE pipe is cheaper and less durable than HDPE - I'd advise against that underground. PEXa ("Uponor/Wirsbo", "ProPEX", "F1960") is the best option, especially underground and in places with a potential for freezing, since it simply expands and contracts ...


3

Absolutely not. Underground rating presumes physical protection by the surrounding earth. Undersea cable is designed to be laid on the sea floor. You may have other threats like water-moved rocks, or the footfalls of people or animals that even undersea cable is not made to deal with. There might be no cable rated for that duty. If the cable is ...


3

The National Electrical Code has code explaining how to protect direct-buried broadband communications cables. However, they also provide an exception to that code, that allows cable companies to basically provide the cable no physical protection at all. In the NEC you'll notice 830.47(C), which provides adequate protection to the buried cable. National ...


3

Put your own ground in at the pole Tapping the PoCo's ground conductor like that is probably a good way to get on bad terms with the power company, who sound like pretty swell folks so far. Instead, I'd use a 6AWG copper wire of my own to my own ground rod driven 8' into the ground at the pole (or some other sort of ground electrode, depending on what soil ...


3

I'm thinking of driving a grounding electrode at the garage and connecting the equipment grounding conductors of the branches in the garage to that electrode, which wouldn't be bonded to the neutral. This doesn't work. Let's say you have a piece of equipment short the hot wire to the ground. The power tries to get back to the source. When it tries on your ...


3

Sounds like cheap is a motivation, but there's a relationship between depth of dig and cost of materials. At 24" of cover you can use plain cable such as UF. At 18" of cover you can use cheapie PVC conduit or EMT. At 6" of cover you can use Rigid metal conduit. So as expensive as Rigid might be, it might be significantly cheaper than renting a ...


3

Chances are good it will oxidize if not hermetically sealed. The (presumably) steel connectors will rust, and the copper core conductor will turn green. Ultimately this could result in a failed connection. Also, you've added quite a bit of resistance to the signal. You may see degraded performance, especially downstream of additional splitters and ...


3

If water gets into the splice, it will certainly effect the performance of the cable. It could create a dead short, which would likely shut down the service completely, or a high impedance short, which might only affect speed and error rates. There are waterproof direct burial splice kits available for coax. You might not have enough slack to make a ...


3

If this is a house drop, the line that runs from the provider's pedestal to the house, it is going to be RG-6 cable most likely. A bit larger than one-quarter of an inch in diameter. There is a product for cable television installers that meets your description, coax in conduit, although that's a very loose description in my opinion. Ostensibly it's been ...


3

Service lateral The service lateral (underground version of the service drop) before the meter is the power company's responsibility. They have a smart meter on it. They know what is installed in the ground (it could be #4Al for all we know) and they know when you draw on it hard enough to cause thermal problems or voltage drop. So go ahead and install ...


3

This is the remnants of a natural gas or propane grill, gas heater, or perhaps a gas lamp. The flared tubing fitting and old control valve stem are the giveaways here. Look around the structures adjacent to the yard for signs of a pipe with a valve for which you cannot ascertain a purpose, so you can at least try to confirm that any leftover fuel supply ...


3

Looks like it's an old pressure tank. Link No idea why it would be sitting under your lawn, maybe the previous owners replaced it and decided to bury it if they had to pay to get rid of it. Even if the tank itself isn't leaking, maybe there's a membrane inside that is. Looks like the standing one second from the left.


2

According to this paper from the University of Nebraska, they can go up to 20 feet in the ground: Subterranean termites are ground-dwelling social insects living in colonies. The two species found in Nebraska have similar habitats. These termites have the ability to adjust the depth of their colony (nest) in soil depending on temperature and moisture ...


2

300.5 also specs 4" of concrete allows 0" cover (other than the 4" concrete) if it's wide enough (6" sideways from the conduit each way.) I believe that "equivalent" would allow things like concrete pavers or bricks as well as poured-in-place concrete for in-trench conduit cover. Not sure how you approached "pressure water" boring - I'd use a section of the ...


2

FYI: The local propane company requires that I maintain a 12" vertical separation with my electric line, so it must dip to 32"+, supplying 12" of separation under the crossing LPG pipe; in No. Calif.


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