38

Ho Le Crap! most of the pics you are showing involved phone service, not in house Ethernet / LAN. Your 6 pin connectors are for RJ16 jacks/plugs (3 line phone service). RJ45 requires 8 conductors and an 8 pin jack/plug. cat5e or cat6 can be terminated on a patch panel, but not a punch down block ("A" in your pics). It can be pretty simple: Connect all ...


33

Read the jacket - I think I can see, but not make out, faint red printing on at least two of the gray cables in your picture. But there's no guarantee that all the gray cables are the same, if this system grew organically over time rather than having been all installed at once. Even if it's CAT3, it will run ethernet (slowly by modern standards.) That will ...


26

To directly answer your question, there is direct bury ethernet cable. You would probably want to go at least 18" deep with it. But there is still a chance it will break, and then you'll be replacing the whole run, so it might make sense to place it in conduit right away to make future replacement easier. However, the real issue is that 1000 ft is much ...


26

A Definite Maybe... Harper's answer gives a good overview of the general setup of a wired home network. There are two separate issues in your particular case that complicate things: CAT 3 CAT 3 is nominally rated for 10 Mbps. It may be able to handle 100 Mbps. But it is not officially designed for that, and there are actual differences between CAT 3, CAT 5, ...


19

Answering your questions in order to the best of my ability: Your cabling is currently connected to a telephone style punch-down block. For standard computer networking, I would purchase a RJ45 patch panel instead, and connect each cable to its own patch panel jack. I will defer to other commenters on how to best avoid interfering with telephone service ...


18

Should a cable that long be in conduit? Yes, that's a good idea, primarily because it'll be easier to repair or replace if/when something goes wrong. CAT6 cable is probably not the best solution to your problem though. As others have noted, there are multiple ways of peeling this onion. Wireless is feasible -- you can get a gigabit-capable wireless bridge ...


16

I did the unthinkable, and started to read the manual for the product you linked, and in the troubleshooting section there is a theme: Try another wall socket and make sure all powerline devices are on the same electrical circuit. If you search the PDF for "circuit" you find this phrase several times. I didn't find where the manual lists using ...


12

Let's assume your local fibre optic company is indeed providing a fiber optic connection. There's two ways that could work: Their normal model is "FTTC" - "Fiber to the cabinet". They have fiber to some roadside cabinet, and the cable between the cabinet and the premises is normally copper telephone cable (at least in the UK). The ...


12

I'm surprised no-one mentioned MoCA (http://www.mocalliance.org/) Depending upon the need for his coax cabling, he might be able to re-purpose it for network usage. Also, Not nearly all routers provide PoE, if it's needed, the OP will want to ensure the router or switch he gets provides it. If not there are PoE injectors that can take it's place.


11

Here's the caveat with old coaxial cable. If this is an older house, it might have cable already, but it's probably RG-59. This is from back in the days of analog signals, well before we were sending digital signals down them. If you have a satellite dish, you'll note they need RG-6 or better. What's the difference? Shielding Now, it's possible there's no ...


9

This was clearly being used as telephone wiring. Even if some of the cables are ethernet cables they have been cut and spliced for phone use and there may be splices hidden in the walls similar to what you see here. That's ok for phones. Even if some of them "work" for ethernet they may work slowly. You will not know, you'll just blame your ISP....


8

Pin 6 is not crimped. Your crimp die is defective or you need to try again. All the pins should be at the same level. But really, punch-down into jacks and buy patch cables as already suggested. Cheaper and more reliable.


8

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


8

Cross-phase communication for power line carrier products can be a challenging problem. (see a white paper from Intellon, a manufacturer of PLC devices, there.) You may be able to improve the coupling between phases, at least for a short time, by turning on an electric-powered heating appliance such as a range, oven, clothes dryer, or water heater. If ...


8

I haven't reviewed all your options yet, but the "expansion board" is a non-starter. It's a TELEPHONE expansion board and will NOT work as you expect. You can't just connect computers in parallel like phones. What need there is a LAN SWITCH and all the appropriate re-wiring in your LV panel. Maybe I'll add to this later...just wanted to let you ...


8

The grey stuff is often non-twisted pair, or unshielded twisted pair. As others have said, read the label. The blue stuff could be cat 3 or cat 5, but unless you have access to both ends, it's a crap shoot whether it has a continuous run. You may be able to figure some out by temporarily unhooking wires, and seeing where you have dial tones. You have some ...


7

It looks like this was originally intended for telephone service distribution. There's a few ways to go about it depending on how neat and tidy you want the job to look. You can pull those blue wires free from the termination block, crimp them with rj-45 heads, and plug them into your switch. Quicker, Easier, Cheapest. You can replace the punchdown block ...


7

First, make sure that your three supply cables are paired properly. The unit has 3 heaters internally. There are several ways cables could be crossed that would result in power from 1 heater coming up one cable and returning on another cable. The heater would work properly, but would kick stupid large amounts of EMF from the two imbalanced cables. Just ...


7

Ethernet splitters are powered. Ethernet uses powered splitters called "Hubs", at their most basic. But they are largely deprecated for Switches, which wire up like hubs, but give each port its own "nano-network" and does packet switching, so every packet only goes out to the ports it needs to, reducing congestion. Because it gives each ...


7

The wiring workmanship shown here, no matter what the cable type is, cannot be relied on to yield satisfactory ethernet operation. The way twisted pairs are untwisted for several inches, with the individual wires crossing other wiring in an uncontrolled fashion... stubs of old parallel connections just left dangling... if it works, it is still likely to ...


6

Get a UPS No, not that UPS. An uninterruptible power supply, also known as a battery backup. This is a box that takes normal AC (e.g., 110-120V in the US) and uses it to charge a battery and power your devices. If power goes out (technically: voltage out of range) then it uses an inverter to power your devices from the battery. All automatically. You ...


6

You can, but it's a VERY poor solution. You've crossed into my professional sphere of operations. Also, if using coax, get extenders that are intended to work over coax - twisted pair and coax are quite different. Both types of converters are made. Even if the mere thought terrifies the heck out of you, fiber is the sensible solution to this problem. It ...


6

My electrician who is wiring the place suggested that I use one ethernet cable and loop it for all devices, This will not work. Don't do this. Your thought of running a dedicated cable to each place it is needed is correct. In my house, I put 2 cables to each room, connected to a single wall plate with 2 jacks on it. I was in a similar situation as you,...


6

There's probably a gob of cable terminations in your basement or utility room. You'll need to find the two cables that go to the rooms involved (or simply place your modem there). With any luck they're labeled. Using a pass-through splicer, connect those two. You should now have a continuous route between rooms, and the only question is whether the ...


6

Even though the cable is good enough for Ethernet transport, you need to change the topology. Basically, your PC, routers, etc... all expect to be connected point to point. PC at one end, router at the other end, for example. Right now, you have all the endpoints connected together. Buy a network switch or hub, install it where all the wires connect. For ...


6

I'd say it's a six-conductor eight-pin RJ-type connector, which means it is not Ethernet. It's likely a (multi-line?) phone connection.


5

Sell it (or leave it as a decoy/deterrent somewhere else you need that) and get a deer camera. Deer cameras are designed for sticking out in the woods to surveil potential deer activity along trails. Hunters use them to plan their hunts. They are motion activated and, you know how many consumer products use those bitsy AA batteries and have a short ...


5

As I understand there is an USB option on the camera. The easiest solution I can think of is connecting it on a raspberry pi which you can connect to you wireless network and retrieve the data daily. You can check out this totorial https://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-webcam-server/ where they are doing the stuff you want to achieve.


5

Long shot...if I'm wrong I'll delete. 112 Amps is a HUGE draw. As you probably know, many houses have a total 100 Amp (sometimes less) service. If your service drop isn't significantly larger, or even if it is but the utility didn't provision it well (e.g., they can, as I understand from other questions regarding service-entrance vs. "other" cables for 100A ...


5

Stated another way, your options are to make the best use possible of the cable that's already installed or install new cable that suits your need better. Ethernet outdoors There exist environmentally hardened Ethernet switches designed for outdoor use, but you won't find them on the shelf at the local big box electronics store and they'll cost more than ...


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