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11

Here's the caveat with old coaxial cable. If this is an older house, it might have cable already, but it's probably RG-59. This is from back in the days of analog signals, well before we were sending digital signals down them. If you have a satellite dish, you'll note they need RG-6 or better. What's the difference? Shielding Now, it's possible there's no ...


8

Pin 6 is not crimped. Your crimp die is defective or you need to try again. All the pins should be at the same level. But really, punch-down into jacks and buy patch cables as already suggested. Cheaper and more reliable.


8

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


7

It looks like this was originally intended for telephone service distribution. There's a few ways to go about it depending on how neat and tidy you want the job to look. You can pull those blue wires free from the termination block, crimp them with rj-45 heads, and plug them into your switch. Quicker, Easier, Cheapest. You can replace the punchdown block ...


7

First, make sure that your three supply cables are paired properly. The unit has 3 heaters internally. There are several ways cables could be crossed that would result in power from 1 heater coming up one cable and returning on another cable. The heater would work properly, but would kick stupid large amounts of EMF from the two imbalanced cables. Just ...


6

Get a UPS No, not that UPS. An uninterruptible power supply, also known as a battery backup. This is a box that takes normal AC (e.g., 110-120V in the US) and uses it to charge a battery and power your devices. If power goes out (technically: voltage out of range) then it uses an inverter to power your devices from the battery. All automatically. You ...


6

You can, but it's a VERY poor solution. You've crossed into my professional sphere of operations. Also, if using coax, get extenders that are intended to work over coax - twisted pair and coax are quite different. Both types of converters are made. Even if the mere thought terrifies the heck out of you, fiber is the sensible solution to this problem. It ...


6

There's probably a gob of cable terminations in your basement or utility room. You'll need to find the two cables that go to the rooms involved (or simply place your modem there). With any luck they're labeled. Using a pass-through splicer, connect those two. You should now have a continuous route between rooms, and the only question is whether the ...


5

Sell it (or leave it as a decoy/deterrent somewhere else you need that) and get a deer camera. Deer cameras are designed for sticking out in the woods to surveil potential deer activity along trails. Hunters use them to plan their hunts. They are motion activated and, you know how many consumer products use those bitsy AA batteries and have a short ...


5

As I understand there is an USB option on the camera. The easiest solution I can think of is connecting it on a raspberry pi which you can connect to you wireless network and retrieve the data daily. You can check out this totorial https://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-webcam-server/ where they are doing the stuff you want to achieve.


5

Long shot...if I'm wrong I'll delete. 112 Amps is a HUGE draw. As you probably know, many houses have a total 100 Amp (sometimes less) service. If your service drop isn't significantly larger, or even if it is but the utility didn't provision it well (e.g., they can, as I understand from other questions regarding service-entrance vs. "other" cables for 100A ...


5

Stated another way, your options are to make the best use possible of the cable that's already installed or install new cable that suits your need better. Ethernet outdoors There exist environmentally hardened Ethernet switches designed for outdoor use, but you won't find them on the shelf at the local big box electronics store and they'll cost more than ...


4

My electrician who is wiring the place suggested that I use one ethernet cable and loop it for all devices, This will not work. Don't do this. Your thought of running a dedicated cable to each place it is needed is correct. In my house, I put 2 cables to each room, connected to a single wall plate with 2 jacks on it. I was in a similar situation as you,...


3

For connecting the router to your phone line, you need to find the 'ISRA punt' (this is specific to the Netherlands). This is where the phone company line from outside connects to the phone wiring in your house. The cable up to the ISRA punt is owned by the phone company and you're not allowed to modify it. You are allowed to modify the wiring that comes out ...


3

If you look to the NEC, which in the US is probably the only legal standard the install will be held to, you don't really have an issue. The NEC doesn't require any separation between the NM and the Cat 6 cable. (See 800.133(A)(2): Other Applications. Communications circuits must maintain 2 in. of separation from electric power or Class 1 circuit ...


3

Google Earth is actually quite helpful without fussing with drones at getting a pretty good idea of the profile along a path. You have to look for it, but it's there in the detailed information about the path. Bring up GE, find you, find the tower, draw a path. There are probably other programs, but that's the one I happen to know and use. Radio signals do ...


3

When you're learning to crimping these, you really need to have a cable tester. These plug into both ends and cycle through each conductor, showing you if there are any disconnected or miswired. Once you identify the problem you can fix it. Be prepared to cut off and redo connectors a few times while learning.


3

The basic problem with installing fiber is it's glass, and glass doesn't bend well. That thin white fiber cable has a minimum bend radius of somewhere around 10 cm, so if you pull it tight around a corner the glass inside it breaks. And splices are not easy. The typical solution is install the fiber modem in the best place for the fiber, and then run a ...


3

Something you might want to consider here is that your phone line inside the house is probably something crappy and unshielded. Cat3, for instance, offers virtually no shielding at all. What I would suggest is upgrading your phone line from the box to your modem with something that is better shielded, like Cat6. If you can afford it, going even higher (Cat6a ...


3

To elaborate further: You have a couple of options Plug modem in where it comes into house. (Probably not ideal due to location) Join outside cable to wall plate, then plug modem in in central utility room. (Again, might not be in central location. Plug modem in as in #1. Many modems have a built-in MOCA adapter (or you can buy one) and connect it to the ...


2

You can run a single cat6 cable from the modem to a more convenient location and then put a simple network switch or (wireless) router to 'split' the cable into 4 or more ports. If you already have a router, you'll want to configure a new router as an access point (essentially assign static IP and turn off DHCP). Cat6 will give you at least 1 Gbps speed. ...


2

Do the house and outbuilding both get power from the same transformer? If so, you could try a power line ethernet adapter. I've heard of them working up to about 1000 feet. So depending on how your power lines are routed, it might work well enough. For best results, you should make sure the adapters on each end are connected to the same phase of power. ...


2

So, based on what I can see there, that's not an ethernet patch panel. The cabling is CAT5, which can be used for ethernet, but those are all being used for phone lines. It looks like there's also a coax splitter, and some unused CAT5 cable. In general, if you wanted to, you could probably repurpose that CAT5 cable and use it for ethernet, but you'd ...


2

Without knowing more details, your plan is reasonable. Network equipment in the garage is not ideal, but not terrible, especially if insulated. On the other hand, if you live in a hot climate, the heat in the summer will be terrible for the gear. Cold is much less of a problem, though extreme cold would be. One minor change is to add a patch panel between ...


2

You should only need one cable for the router. Your computer, printer and any other wired devices can all connect to the router. As far as cable type, I would install Cat 5e but you could future proof a bit more with Cat 6. Just a question of cable and jack costs - the work is the same. I normally use plenum rated cable everywhere but I do commercial ...


2

As long as you are getting an acceptable signal level at the router, replacing the six-way splitter with a coupler won't accomplish much. You can tell via a speed test, which is readily available on the web. However, reliability will be improved by replacement. If you install the coupler, save the splitter for possible future applications


2

You'll want a splitter where the -db is smaller. The bigger the -#, or smaller, the more signal that is lost. I personally choose a -3.5 splitters and run 1 specifically to the modem and then the other to another splitter for the tvs. It starts at 0 from the orange cable. There is good article over at http://eqrunner.com/CrewNotes/CNCoaxsplitter.php that ...


2

Your basic plan is just fine. The key problem you are having is figuring out which cable is which. The secondary problem you may be having is making sure the jacks are wired correctly. There are tools designed specifically for both of these tasks. Pros get the good stuff. For a once-in-a-while use you can probably make do with the cheaper versions. A couple ...


2

Find out what the DSL modem sees. DSL is designed to detect and avoid all kinds of interference entering the line. Technically, it splits up the whole band into many narrow channels, continuously monitors them for noise and only uses the noise-free ones to transmit data. Any interference should thus just make the line slower but not kill it completely. Also,...


2

I had a very similar situation in a house, but the difference is that all my ethernet cables from around the house terminated in the attic. That made it a little easier to deal with than yours, but maybe my approach will give you an idea. Rather than worry about finding a router/switch that would survive in the 130F heat of the attic, I put a patch panel ...


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