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6

Aluminum wont help much, unless it is quite thick. It will bend easily, without distributing the weight evenly over the extra anchors. If you go with a non articulating mount, so the monitor is against the wall, you may be able to get away with strong drywall anchors. With an articulating mount I wouldnt risk it. I would get a small piece of cheap but ...


5

Yes there are guidelines for how to place the speakers. E.g. here is a Dolby 5.1 placement guide. But the short answer is A, B, C, F, and E in your diagram, if you have to pick from those exact spots. Also note that some higher-end stereos have a calibration feature that will use a microphone and test tones to detect the placement of each individual speaker,...


5

As long as you're placing your bolts for the TV mount into to the wall studs, or if it is brick into a secure hole in the brick the weight will be no problem. If you just put the screws into the drywall, it will not be very secure.


4

Yes it can.* *Your mileage may vary. Using a 3/4" plywood backboard spanning 3 studs, I used 18 3" long 1/4" diameter self drilling screws (6 on each stud, 3 above and below the mount respectively) to mount it. 3" screws were used because of a double layering of 5/8" drywall behind the plywood. Large flat washers were used to bite the screws onto the ...


4

I do this for a (part of my) living. Steel studs will not provide the support you need with a cantilevered arm. If you want to surface-mount the TV then you can use toggle bolts through a steel stud, but a cantilevered arm WILL fail. The only appropriate solution is to open up the wall and either replace the steel studs in question with wooden studs, or ...


4

Last time I encountered that, I put two 2x4's across the stud span, chamfered the edges too a 45 angle and painted it to match the wall. Mounted the bracket onto that, if it's a rental or you just don't want to wreck the walls, put a thin piece of cardboard between the 2x4 and wall before you mount it to make sure it doesn't pull up any paint when you remove ...


3

I would definitely take advantage of the block wall. I would use 2-1/2" tapcons with 1/4" fender washers straight through the drywall and than through some type of 7/8" spacer, and finally into the cinder block. The 7/8 inch spacer will prevent the screws from collapsing the drywall as the screws are tightened. It would be best to use the largest TapCon ...


3

If (as seems likely, but you don't tell us what TV you have) the HDMI on the TV is (are) all inputs, you will have to use optical (or some other audio - coaxial digital, for instance) output. If the TV has HDMI outputs, you might be able to rig something where one of those goes to an input on the reciver, but that might not work with having the picture on ...


3

Something like this? http://www.justlaine.com/2011/01/17365.html It wouldn't be too difficult to make. For a 50" TV, you'll have to build a big one.


2

You mention that there were sparks and a concern about your ground, I'd check for an incorrectly wired outlet as a precaution. The initial check is a simple outlet tester. These have 3 lights and quickly identify a hot ground or swapped neutral/hot, along with other common issues. What they can't identify is if there's voltage on both the neutral and ground,...


2

I think overall that mounting a TV above a fireplace is a bad idea. It is far from an optimum location to be staring toward when watching the thing. You apparently already understand the viewing problem due to asking about how to mount the TV in the manner you ask about. There are several other problems to consider about this as well. One is that if the ...


2

So it's been ages since this question was first asked and I've only just managed to get round to wiring this up. I went for an infra-red motion sensor switch. This has been placed up in the loft, with the motion sensor placed discretely under the frame in which the TV sits, so that it is out of sight. The actual switch unit is in the loft space and is wired ...


2

You could go the route of having no switches in the bathroom, and only a plug and switch upstairs Loft. Step 1: Get a standby plug adapter, which will shut off power to the TV when its in standby mode. this will reduce electrical risk, fire and save power. - the unit has an infra-red reset switch, so when it senses your remote IR beam, it will energise the ...


2

It is almost always diagonal measurement, from corner to opposite corner. Sometimes, they will refer to xx-class size (e. g. 45 inch diagonal-class, meaning "almost that size". Conventional screens are generally 4:3 width-to-height ratio. Wide screens are generally 16:9, occasionally 16:10 or other ratios.


2

When in use, the chimney itself will be at a higher temperature than ambient. Just how high will depend on several factors: materials used, thickness, fire heat output, etc. You can get an idea of just how hot just by touching the visible part of the chimney with your hand, and a more precise reading from an IR gun. This is actually a desirable feature, ...


2

Sanus makes tilting wall mounts that are designed for an off-center mounting on a stud. You can adjust the television a couple of inches to the right or left of the stud so that it sits where you want it to be. Check out their website for more details. They have a model that'll hold up to a 130 pound TV, or so their engineers claim.


2

Measure the side to side of the back plate. I believe that most manufacturer's will have the plate long enough to span 2 wall studs. (BTW: most wall framing is established at 16 inches on center or 14 1/2 inches in between 2 wall studs). If your plat measures at least 16 inches install it on the 2 studs closest to the center of the wall. Some TV wall mounts ...


2

Go to your local hardware store and ask for help finding aluminum or bronze sleeves (bushings) like so: They should be the same length as (or slightly shorter than) the thickness of your brackets. They'll fill the gap between your screws and the bracket holes. Also get some suitable washers to enlarge the screw heads.


2

As Dan G pointed out, being off-ctr by 0.64 cm on each stud really doesn't matter. Personally :-) , if I had to deal w/ a similar situation but a worse mismatch, e.g. 14-inch vs 17-inch spacing, I'd do one of 2 things. 1) bolt short lengths of 2x4 vertically to the existing studs, then hang the bracket on these add-ons. 2) (more work and less stable) get ...


2

This shouldn't be an issue. You could put a wire nut on the bare wires in the box or wrap each of them in electrical tape in case the same wire runs to other outlets or is connected to your coaxial distribution.


2

Yes, you can unscrew the terminals, keep the wires separated with individual wire nuts or other insulated wire terminating device, or just separately wrapped with electrical tape, and install a blank plate. If you want to do it correctly, you might need to consider this part of the National Electrical Code (NEC): 800.25 Abandoned Cables. The accessible ...


1

There are many devices out there that will do this. Just do a google search for 'HDMI audio splitter'. You will find your choice of HDMI switchs (2-4 inputs, 1 output) that will extract audio and a lot of these boxes will auto switch the input to the one that is on. You will also find boxes with a single HDMI input/output that will extract audio as well. ...


1

HDMI includes audio in it's signal. Splitting off the audio isn't very hard, but recombining is, so most systems use one of two methods: Some audio equipment has HDMI inputs and outputs. These pass through the video to your projector and do the audio themselves. Many (most?) projectors and TVs that have an HDMI input also have an audio output, either a ...


1

You can find the studs, I know you can! Here is a link to many helpful tips: http://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-find-a-wall-stud/ but the short version is, measure from the corner of the room (there will be a stud within 1" of each corner of the room and look for the stud on a 16" spacing (unless your home/condo/apt is really old). Drill a few pilot ...


1

I am also remodeling our bathroom and have placed the on/off switch next to the light switch which is outside the bathroom door as you enter. I guess the other way would be to use a normal corded isolation switch mounted on the ceiling. Good luck ( I am also not a qualified electrician but do have a friendly one who checks what is done and would recommend ...


1

If you really want it flush, you can cut out a rectangle of the drywall between the studs and replace it with plywood or MDF of the same thickness and then attach the TV mount directly to the solid panel.


1

Bridge the studs by using wood and connecting the studs and forming a ledge for the tv then to be anchored to The wood connect the studs which should be 16" apart giving the strength of both studs supporting the wood between then screw the tv using toggle bolts long enlighten to go through the bridge to the drywall


1

Toggles and other heavy weight drywall anchors can be suitable for TV mounts when the mount is flush. Or toggles in to metal studs. Since the load is mostly shear and not pull-out, this is fairly safe. (Provided the drywall is thick enough, the anchors are installed correctly, the wall is properly supported, and lots of other considerations too numerous to ...


1

1/4 diameter, 1.5 to 2 inch long (depending on bracket thickness) Tapcons. This is not an ad, it's what I've been using for 20+ years. They will not penetrate the inside of the chimney. Its painted so holes in the brick are a non-cosmetic issue. A wrap-a-round metal band would look like it's from the 80's and not anywhere near as strong. You can have as ...


1

Something I just tried and is working great is the Toggler High-Performance Anchors. I got them at Lowes. They come 2 or I think 10 to a pack. the 2 pack was about 7 bucks. Says in Drywall alone it can hold 265 pounds. What we did was Drill a 1/2 hole into the Drywall and the metal Stud. Installed the 2 toggles and it is supporting my TV great. This ...


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