33

The OEM cable does not have a ground or earth connection. The cable on the right does. So this will be a safe replacement for the original cable. The ground connection will not be used and that wire in the cable is not connected to either of the other wires in that cable.


30

Absolutely no problem. The screws (actually called "lag bolts") bite into the wood immediately around them, and the wood fibers around that hold the bolt in place. Yes the holes you made already weaken the fibers immediately around them but the amount is insignificant. And, for a flat screen TV like you're describing, the weight you'll be putting on ...


27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


20

There are wall plates that are designed for your situation. Power For power, you can add the socket as you described. Low voltage For HDMI/signal/etc low voltage stuff, there are a number of options. Running conduit is the best for future flexibility. I personally like just having a cable sticking out of the wall, rather than putting connectors ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


19

Yes. They can be however far apart the builder wants them. I have used 3-4 studs within 16" when doing bathrooms, high traffic corner, in bathrooms for showers... and have installed an extra stud because of a previous mistake. I only use magnetic stud finder (finds your screws). If you use a method and you just aren't 100% sure the best thing to do ...


17

To answer the question of what these cables are called, they are IEC 60320 (commonly called kettle plugs) connectors. If you take a look at the "Appliance_couplers" section of the linked page you will see the left is c17/c18 (the male and female versions have different numbers) while the right is c13/14. It looks like from the table the plug on the ...


17

The answer would seem to be "Yes." In short, you'll want to look for VESA and UL certifications for monitor/TV mounting brackets. There are VESA Flat Display Mounting Interface (FDMI) specifications for wall mounts but those seem to be mostly constrained to the "geometry" of the mount and its usefulness for fitting VESA-compliant ...


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


10

Now that I see your photo I'd do this differently. I'd install a vertical cleat just behind the faceframe on each side of the cabinet, maybe 1" back (the thickness of the plate plus 1/4"). I'd then span a sheet of 3/4" plywood across them, creating a solid face on which to install your mount. You should have either a cabinet wall or framing to screw into. ...


10

A bunch of ways to do this. What I would probably do myself, which is not what you are currently planning, is: Cut a piece of plywood, probably 3/4" thick, 24" tall by ~ 20" (studs 16" apart) or ~ 28" (studs 24" apart). Mount the plywood with 3 screws on each stud. Paint the plywood to match the wall. It doesn't have to be perfect because it will be mostly ...


10

It is a bad idea. TV screens are designed to be viewed basically level from your eyes as you sit in your TV room. If you mount it above the mantel you will forever looking up to see the thing. The heat thing is also a concern for electronics as you have mentioned. Raise the temperature some and in the best case you will age certain components and shorten ...


10

Although you TV set may be light enough so that wall anchors will support the weight they may pull loose when the set gets re-positioned and adjusted. Always try to secure the mount to a framing member (stud). Most mounts are designed for this installation as they have openings spaced at 16 inches (the distance between each studs' center). A stud sensor is ...


9

Electrically, you can go either way Attaching to the push connector or attaching to the backstabs or screws is 3 of one, half dozen of the other. I mean, backstabs (and push connectors) are known to be unreliable, so you take your chances of having an hours-long, frustrating bug hunt. Screws are more reliable, but you must torque them adequately. A ...


9

16 is a typical maximum spacing, there is no restriction on having more, it just may be overbuilt. It can be quite common to encounter studs that are doubled up or have strange intervals. Common causes are framing of windows or doors, made especially strange if the window or door is no longer there. Same with changes to load bearing wall situations can leave ...


9

You are correct to hang a TV (or anything else "heavy") from a stud or other building structural member. This provides reliable support under static and dynamic loading (think: weight, moment-arm, any leaning, minor earthquakes, vibrations from door slams), and ensures the wall material does not bend or crumble or crack over time. When you use a ...


8

No, you can not mount the TV the way you have described. Since you want the TV to articulate out from the wall, most of the force will be pull-out instead of shear. The barn boards are not attached to the wall in such a way to support your TV. It's likely you would rip the barn boards right off the wall, or break one where you drill for the toggle bolts. ...


8

Is this safe to do? Yes. Does the third prong of the new cable interact in any way with the other two? The third pin is a protective earth connection, some appliances "class 1" require a protective earth connection to maintain single-fault safety. Others "class 2" do not. The connectors are sensibly designed so you can use a cord with ...


8

Personally I've never had much luck with electronic stud finders. Other techniques that work for me: Use a magnet out of an old hard drive to locate nails/screws. Find one then search up and down for others. Hits in the top/bottom plate can be misleading. Wrap the magnet in some tape to help it slide over the wall without marking. I tried dangling the ...


7

Aluminum wont help much, unless it is quite thick. It will bend easily, without distributing the weight evenly over the extra anchors. If you go with a non articulating mount, so the monitor is against the wall, you may be able to get away with strong drywall anchors. With an articulating mount I wouldnt risk it. I would get a small piece of cheap but ...


7

You haven't told us what mount you're referring to, but most aren't designed for specific stud centers. Instead, they have a range of available mounting area (and many will accommodate 24" centers as well). It's very likely that your mount will work just fine on 12" centers. You should be able to put a tape measure on the mount and verify. Can you position ...


7

Of course it's illegal to run power cords inside walls. National Electrical Code 400.8 rolls through the things you can't do with cord, and it's mostly a list of schemes to use them as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a structure. Nope, just nope. Data cables, on the other hand, can go right into the wall cavity. Punch a hole in the drywall and ...


7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


7

If you insist on opening the wall, which seems rather foolish to me considering the other options available, I wouldn't install a full-height stud. I'd keep the destruction to a minimum and enjoy a better outcome as a result Open a section of wall slightly taller than the TV mount bracket and to the center of each adjacent stud. Add cross-blocks between ...


6

According to this source, which unfortunately does not cite its own sources, the following considerations are needed when drilling into studs: Holes in bearing wall studs (exterior and interior walls that bear the weight of the roof and/or other stories above) may not exceed 40 percent of the width of the stud. Notches in bearing wall studs may not ...


6

Living and working as a cable television technician in a beachside region, I can attest to the value of the silicone dielectric grease for improving the lifespan of these connections. Salt air eats everything in time, yet the grease prevented corrosion after five years. The fittings were assembled with "boots," rubber covers which resemble spark plug wiring ...


6

1 - Absolutely yes. Use a stud finder. 2 - No. 3 - Don't. A stud finder will help you again. Look vertically to see if you have an outlet directly below where you're drilling or above as that's an indication of a conduit as well.


6

Open up wall where you want to mount the TV, add some wood crossing, re-drywall, install your kit correctly. I would go so far as adding a full wood "box" so that you have an area parallel to the metal studs that can help support the crosses.


5

I do this for a (part of my) living. Steel studs will not provide the support you need with a cantilevered arm. If you want to surface-mount the TV then you can use toggle bolts through a steel stud, but a cantilevered arm WILL fail. The only appropriate solution is to open up the wall and either replace the steel studs in question with wooden studs, or ...


5

Why you shouldn't use NM cable NM-B cable (Romex®) is not designed to be used as a flexible cord, and must be properly secured and supported. It's also not rated for use where it may be exposed to physical damage. Flexible cords have thicker jackets, which are designed to hold up to a bit more abuse. They also contain stranded wires, which hold up to ...


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