47

First off, your cabling doubles as your telephone wiring, so 2 per room is reasonable. Put a jack anywhere you think you may need a phone, computer, or media device (TV/Boxee/game console/etc). If you know you are going to likely need a couple at some particular spot (eg, a home office, or your main TV watching area) then you can do that as well. Run all ...


41

You have good answers so far, but I have several items that I don't think have been covered yet. I will start by recapping. Number of Cables per room Cat5e (and cat6) can be used for telephone, both the old school phone and VoIP phones. This makes it easier to not have to worry about running as many different types of cables. I would highly suggest going ...


22

Cat6 is capable of very high speeds (by today's standards; hi 2021!), but only within a bunch of additional constraints over lower-speed cable. Especially difficult is terminating the cable. When you untwist enough to terminate, it's easy to expose yourself to interference. Some people buy long, pre-terminated Cat6 and pull that, instead of pulling bulk ...


22

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


17

Before you spend too much time and money on this, buy a new wireless router. They've come a long way. When finishing my basement I added two communication drops to each room and...never used them. Wireless was fine. What's more important than the cable is that you have an easily accessible way to run what you need at a later date. Smurf tube is a common ...


16

Looking in 2011 National Electric Code Changes of Interest, they reference NFPA 90A-2009 : Section 4.3.4 of NFPA 90A-2009 states that “Wiring shall not be installed in air ducts” unless it is “directly associated with the air distribution system and does not exceed 1.22m (4 ft).” I don't have access to the full code, but just in the notes on the ...


14

I believe it is splitting the signal, each output will have a specific loss associated. Some splitters will unevenly split the signal (commonly called a tap), which is handy to give a better signal to a longer run or to the cable modem. You can get a straight through connector at any HI store. That said, even these will have some loss of signal, just no ...


14

It's not real critical. When wiring phone centers we used metal raceways (or a thrown-together wood one) in the ceiling, but for my house I used pipe clamps like the one you posted at about 4' spacing. I like to add a wrap of double-sided velcro around bundles going to the same box, also about every 4'. Near the demarcation point I might use a few screw-in ...


13

Couple problems I see. First is the textured ceiling. You'll never be able to open that up and patch it without being obvious, the texture is something that just isn't done these days. Second, the exterior wall should have insulation in it, so you'll end up fishing the line through insulation and the vapor barrier. Instead, I'd suggest running the line ...


13

I think I'd look for the outside spliter and run the cable around the outside of the house under the edge of the siding and try to enter as close as possible through the wall behind the TV. If the spliter is indoors, run a line back outdoors and around. BMitch is correct, you will never be able to fish that distance without opening the ceiling, and cutting ...


13

Fiber would be ideal, but... Bear in mind that terminating fiber is more exacting and more expensive. It requires special equipment and special skills. You can't just cut fiber with a pair of wire snips and crimp a plug on the end of it. The ends have to be angled and polished, and it sucks when you poke the little fibers in the ends of your fingers, etc. ...


12

National Electrical Code 2008 300.22 Wiring in Ducts, Plenums, and Other Air-Handling Spaces. (B) Ducts or Plenums Used for Environmental Air. Only wiring methods consisting of Type MI cable, Type MC cable employing a smooth or corrugated impervious metal sheath without an overall nonmetallic covering, electrical metallic tubing, flexible metallic ...


12

What I have yet to find a solid answer on is what is typically run to the keypads. Do I run cat5/6, or use the same security wire (or both)? I recommend running 22/4 and cat5e from the security panel to the keypads. That provides lots of options. Once I run the wires to each window, where do I leave the wire? I recommend leaving a coil of wire in the ...


12

They are called "wire grommets" or "electrical bulkhead fittings", and if you search for those (or some combination of those words) you should find what you're after. I typically seal large exterior holes with expanding foam, and smaller holes with silicone caulk. I've run many cat5 and coax cables through walls, and generally keep the hole just slightly ...


12

National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 8 Communications Systems Article 800 Communications Circuits I. General 800.24 Mechanical Execution of Work. Communications circuits and equipment shall be installed in a neat and workmanlike manner. Cables installed exposed on the surface of ceilings and sidewalls shall be supported by the building ...


11

"No Volume Limit" Advantage of Open-back Boxes The open-backed boxes have the advantage that they don't limit the termination area's volume to the size of the box. Here are a few scenarios where having more volume than what a box provides is important: In the case where the structured cable will be run directly to a device in the room (think speakers), ...


11

Here's the caveat with old coaxial cable. If this is an older house, it might have cable already, but it's probably RG-59. This is from back in the days of analog signals, well before we were sending digital signals down them. If you have a satellite dish, you'll note they need RG-6 or better. What's the difference? Shielding Now, it's possible there's no ...


10

Since you are in a one-family dwelling, there is really only one important article to be aware of. 800.26 Spread of Fire or Products of Combustion. Installations of communications cables and communications raceways in hollow spaces, vertical shafts, and ventilation or air-handling ducts shall be made so that the possible spread of fire or products of ...


10

Yes, its still valid. Power and data cable coatings are insulation - designed to protect from electric shock and to avoid short circuits. They do not interfere with magnetic fields. I do not know what kind of shielding you are talking about - I have never seen any modern power or data cables with shielding that blocks magnetic fields. Magnetic fields are ...


10

This has been discussed many times on this site and maybe even a few times on Server Fault. Step 1: The plan Come up with a plan - how many drops per room? Where will you terminate all the wires back to? Are there clear path's from floor to floor via the walls? ie: is there an empty part of the wall on the first floor but not on the 2nd floor? Do interior ...


9

What about running it along the underside of that shelf that runs around the perimeter of the room? Just drill through the wall underneath the shelf and between some studs, and run the wire tucked under the shelf all the way back against the wall. You won't be able to see it unless you're sitting on the floor.


9

2 Cat5e drops to each bedroom. You can put them in the same faceplate; you can also put your coax cable for the tv / receiver in that panel also (including phone) - Leviton makes face plates that accept from 1 to 6 universal connections (this can be rj45, rj11, coax, etc...) You need a switch regardless to break out your modem (be it DSL, Fiber, cable modem)...


9

Note, I'm not anywhere near an alarm professional, however I have installed a couple systems before and have just recently been researching again as I prepare to move into a new house where I'd like to install an alarm. Keypads You'll want a keypad anywhere you normally enter/exit the house, such as by the garage door or back door. As @bib points out, you ...


9

No, not a bit. Twisted pair cables are HIGHLY resistant to interference pickup. Furthermore, DC does not cause interference, since it is basically an unchanging current, so there's no change in magnetic fields from it to cause interference (other than when turned on, and off - and the twisted pair cables will reject that interference by design, anyway.) I ...


9

This is what ENT (or any sort of conduit) is for If you want to leave "room for installing wires in the future" in an electrical installation, you put a conduit in the wall so that the installer who is doing the pulls can actually do the pull without getting wires damaged on edges and whatnot. For data wiring, electrical nonmetallic tubing (ENT) ("smurf ...


8

Wire is cheap, opening up walls later is expensive. I would lean towards running as much cable as you think you might need, even if it isn't terminated, and just coiled behind the wall, or in a junction box with a blank plate on it. Another tip, not just for cabling, is to take pictures of the pipes, wires, etc, before the walls are closed. This will be ...


8

Well, here I go potentially disagreeing with some more experienced folks. Assuming you have clearance over the ceiling all the way to the back wall, this is doable with fish tape and a hole in the wall with the tv on it. Get some small conduit (even thin pvc pipe will do), and put a 90 degree angle in the end. In the case of metal conduit you would bend it ...


8

TL;DR it should be OK to run them together. The signals from a security sensor are typically very low frequency because they're generated by the switch within the sensor opening and closing as the sensor activates. So for a motion detector, it might open and close a few times as you cross the field of view; a door or window sensor would switch as often as ...


8

The first step is to cut the cable to length. You can use any tool capable of cutting the cable, personally I reach for my trusty lineman pliers. Once you cut the cable, it will look something like this Now that the cable is the proper length, you'll have to strip the insulation off. Again, you can use any tool capable of stripping the insulation without ...


8

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


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