25

If you are removing it, remove it. It's only "short-sighted" if you have any conception that you might want a landline phone there. You MIGHT be able (depending on how snug it is, and how many layers of paint are on the cable making it fatter) to just stuff the (uncut) cable down the hole in the floor once you have it unstapled. But simply snipping ...


24

Most likely this was a satellite dish hookup. Back in the 90s, when the technology was nascent, each box got its own LNB feed from the dish. You'd also need an antenna hookup to get local broadcasts (as in two separate cable feeds). The phone line was so the satellite box could phone the company and report whatever purchases were made via the remote (like ...


24

Barring you bother to source high-voltage rated Cat5e or Cat6A, sharing a conduit with line voltage is a clear and blatant code violation. It's got nothing to do with nails. You should have put in two conduits, or three to cover the unknown next thing. Cat5e will carry full gigabit the same distance that Cat6 or 6A will. If you are committed to a cable ...


23

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


17

If you read up on the standards for datacom cabling, you might end up with your head spinning. Those standards are very demanding and detailed. They do make sense for big installations in commercial buildings, hospitals, data centers, etc. But keep in mind, you'll also find tons of material based on partial understanding of the industry standards, and some ...


15

National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 8 Communications Systems Article 800 Communications Circuits I. General 800.24 Mechanical Execution of Work. Communications circuits and equipment shall be installed in a neat and workmanlike manner. Cables installed exposed on the surface of ceilings and sidewalls shall be supported by the building structure in such a ...


15

Even if you never have a landline, you might want to use that wire again. I have repurposed old phone wiring for many things = thermostats, alarms, doorbells, etc. If you really don't like looking at it, you could clip it off just above the staple above the baseboard. If you ever need to re-use it, there's enough to work with. I would terminate the cable ...


15

Wire access space. When you plant something near the breaker box, you can't then enter the breaker box from the area blocked by that something. You are going to be blocking off (what sounds like) a whole side of your breaker box from access. That can come back to bite when you need to add something later, and really wish that the other box was in the next ...


14

Fiber would be ideal, but... Bear in mind that terminating fiber is more exacting and more expensive. It requires special equipment and special skills. You can't just cut fiber with a pair of wire snips and crimp a plug on the end of it. The ends have to be angled and polished, and it sucks when you poke the little fibers in the ends of your fingers, etc. ...


13

They are called "wire grommets" or "electrical bulkhead fittings", and if you search for those (or some combination of those words) you should find what you're after. I typically seal large exterior holes with expanding foam, and smaller holes with silicone caulk. I've run many cat5 and coax cables through walls, and generally keep the hole just slightly ...


12

Simple cup hooks will suffice $5 for a pack of 25. src If screwing into the bottom, then at the first joist, you have two of them about an inch apart, and you face them opposite directions (not like in the photo). That way, to get the cable into them, you have to zig-zag it. This assures the cables will not escape. Then every couple of joists, you have ...


11

This has been discussed many times on this site and maybe even a few times on Server Fault. Step 1: The plan Come up with a plan - how many drops per room? Where will you terminate all the wires back to? Are there clear path's from floor to floor via the walls? ie: is there an empty part of the wall on the first floor but not on the 2nd floor? Do interior ...


11

Here's the caveat with old coaxial cable. If this is an older house, it might have cable already, but it's probably RG-59. This is from back in the days of analog signals, well before we were sending digital signals down them. If you have a satellite dish, you'll note they need RG-6 or better. What's the difference? Shielding Now, it's possible there's no ...


10

No, not a bit. Twisted pair cables are HIGHLY resistant to interference pickup. Furthermore, DC does not cause interference, since it is basically an unchanging current, so there's no change in magnetic fields from it to cause interference (other than when turned on, and off - and the twisted pair cables will reject that interference by design, anyway.) I ...


10

This is what ENT (or any sort of conduit) is for If you want to leave "room for installing wires in the future" in an electrical installation, you put a conduit in the wall so that the installer who is doing the pulls can actually do the pull without getting wires damaged on edges and whatnot. For data wiring, electrical nonmetallic tubing (ENT) ("smurf ...


10

This answer is from an Australian (licensed cabler) perspective. Based on the fact you have metal conduit and a basement, I'm assuming you're in the US/Canada. The rules here are definitely open to interpretation, but there are two main clauses from AS/ACIF S008:2006 - clauses 8.1 and 8.6 that apply here (in AU): Telecommunications cabling must be supported ...


9

Fish Tape A real (and "reel") fish tape is often the tool to use. Because it is flexible and very long (typically 25' or 50'), you can get a lot farther than just fiberglass rods. But it can be a pain to use, depending on the path. Tape to old, pull new, pull back old When you have (as I think you do) an existing cable that you want to keep and ...


8

Concrete walls typically have conduits where all wiring passes (edit: as pointed out by @alx9r, this might not always be the case. Sometimes wiring is cast directly into the concrete). This allows you to add additional wires to the same conduits, but doesn't help if you need to pass a wire between two places that don't have a conduit already in the wall. ...


8

The first step is to cut the cable to length. You can use any tool capable of cutting the cable, personally I reach for my trusty lineman pliers. Once you cut the cable, it will look something like this Now that the cable is the proper length, you'll have to strip the insulation off. Again, you can use any tool capable of stripping the insulation without ...


8

(Lots of) Home runs are good You are correct that you want to run a cable to each room from the central switch. In fact, I would run at least 1 more cable than you think you will need to each room, and consider running a line or 2 to other rooms as well - especially if your walls are open. Cable is cheap, and pulling 4 cables instead of 3 is no more work ...


8

Pin 6 is not crimped. Your crimp die is defective or you need to try again. All the pins should be at the same level. But really, punch-down into jacks and buy patch cables as already suggested. Cheaper and more reliable.


8

You mean 800.133. And this very concept of mixing comms and power is highly improbable. I know you're casting around for a way to do this, but this sort of "hopeful reading" is very highly prone to confirmation bias. NM-B is always useless in conduit Using NM-B in the conduit wiring method is not illegal, but buys you nothing but headaches. It's very ...


8

I haven't reviewed all your options yet, but the "expansion board" is a non-starter. It's a TELEPHONE expansion board and will NOT work as you expect. You can't just connect computers in parallel like phones. What need there is a LAN SWITCH and all the appropriate re-wiring in your LV panel. Maybe I'll add to this later...just wanted to let you ...


7

Cable companies should not be penetrating the building with cables like the way you describe. Water can flow down this wire and into the building if it's not sealed properly. And if it is sealed properly, if the wire is able to be moved in and out because it's not securely anchored then it will eventually be able to leak should water get around it. Have ...


7

As stated in a comment, hiding behind crown molding is a possibility, as is going behind baseboard molding. If I really wanted to do this, I'd pull the baseboards, and run them on a tablesaw with a narrow dado blade to cut a pocket for Cat6 cable. Then you can run along walls, poke through them to adjacent rooms, etc. I'd look to place switches ...


7

OK, this is kind of a rambling question with a lot of details, but let me give you some leads on some of them: Wall Plate If you want to install a wall plate, you'll want to clean up the opening and then install a "low voltage mounting bracket", which is a square piece of plastic that frames the opening and provides a place to attach the plate: (Wall ...


7

The cable you bought looks fine. You don't need STP (shielded twisted pair) wire. From what I've heard, it's mostly used in industrial environments with a lot of electrical interference issues. Won't really apply to residential environments. I don't think that's a drain wire since the cable is not shielded. That extra wire is not copper in the picture, so ...


7

No, the intelligent (budget-concious) solution in this case is to use the cat3 conductors and any of various schemes to run ethernet over them; starting with the base case that 10Mbit ethernet runs happily on Cat3 wire, and many Cat3 wires are actually fine for 100 Mbit. Those are "free" solutions. You could put trunking switches on either end and run a ...


7

It looks like this was originally intended for telephone service distribution. There's a few ways to go about it depending on how neat and tidy you want the job to look. You can pull those blue wires free from the termination block, crimp them with rj-45 heads, and plug them into your switch. Quicker, Easier, Cheapest. You can replace the punchdown block ...


7

The cable type is almost certainly BT spec CW1308, 3 pairs would be normal for UK extension wiring. It won't be to Cat5 or better spec, but over a short run and without external interference you will probably get 10Mbits over it, maybe even 100Mbits.


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