40

The problem with almost any adhesive is that the longer it stays on, the more likely it is to either fall off when you don't want it to fall off, or stay on when you don't want it to (typically this means "top layer of paint comes off with the tape"). Aesthetic considerations may not be an issue right now (when I was a kid, I definitely ran wires ...


30

Cut an opening in the wall for a low voltage box/bracket,and install the bracket. Position a flexible drill bit into the hole, so that you'll drill straight through the bottom plate of the wall and into the crawlspace. This is a poor image since the guy is not drilling straight down, but you get the idea. Go into the crawlspace and attach the cable to the ...


30

Another option no one has mentioned is to use cable raceway The raceway itself will come with adhesive, or sometimes be nailed into the wall. It's more expensive, but the end result will look much nicer than tape or staples, and be more flexible for future expansion. For even more flexibility, you can terminate it to an ethernet jack: By the way, ...


21

Hmm, when I see your first try then maybe my improvisation-style is sufficient for your needs. If appearence is not critical and money-is-out, instead of using tapes I use my stapler and cut rectangular pieces of card-paper to make a loop around the cable keeping a tongue to be stapled to the wall. The problem of destructive tapes doesn't occur, and the ...


20

Two options that come to mind: manassehkatz's answer to use cable clips is a great one if you'd like a lasting solution to using a long ethernet cable. I'd like to offer an alternative to having a long running ethernet cable. Powerline adapters! A Powerline adapter is a device which uses your homes electric wiring to transmit communications signals. The ...


17

There is a quick and easy way to do this, no special tools, $10 of parts, 20 minutes work if all goes well. Cut in an old work low voltage mounting bracket on either side of the wall, back to back and use a "duckbill" cover for a finished appearance, (the one in the photo is an Arlington CE1) All you need to do this is a level to make sure you ...


17

Absolutely not. Low voltage (LV) and mains cannot share a conduit. Further, you cannot attach anything else to the outside of the electrical conduit. So forget about ty-wrapping the LV cable to the outside of the conduit...


13

Check your baseboard (what they call it in the US) or skirting board (what they call it in the UK). Typically this doesn't fit completely against the floorboards, so there's a gap between that and the floorboards (to accomodate movement of the floor and/or wall over changing humidity and temperature). If this gap is wide enough, you may be able to slot the ...


11

Measure carefully. There are usually plenty of reference points... duct vents plumbing, etc. Once you've done that, either drill a very small hole to feel for the wall's bottom plate, or run a long screw up through. An assistant on the floor above can help determine if you're off target and warn you. If you have absolutely no reference points, drive a ...


11

The NEC does not restrict the number of bends on SE cable. Raceway methods restrict bends to limit stress on wire being pulled through the raceway.


10

This has been discussed many times on this site and maybe even a few times on Server Fault. Step 1: The plan Come up with a plan - how many drops per room? Where will you terminate all the wires back to? Are there clear path's from floor to floor via the walls? ie: is there an empty part of the wall on the first floor but not on the 2nd floor? Do interior ...


10

You can run cables parallel outside conduit. Ideally a few inches apart but in practice right next to each other is usually OK. But you can't run them together inside conduit. Plus, inside conduit you would be better off for the electrical cable using individual wires (appropriately sized & rated) instead, which is not an option for the CAT6 anyway.


8

There are plenty of self-adhesive cable clips to be had. I'd go with a low-profile option for the neatest appearance. Be aware that many such items have strong adhesives that will leave residue on paint and/or tear paint loose when removed. I'd be looking for a wireless solution. Wifi mesh kits are pretty darn good these days.


7

As stated in a comment, hiding behind crown molding is a possibility, as is going behind baseboard molding. If I really wanted to do this, I'd pull the baseboards, and run them on a tablesaw with a narrow dado blade to cut a pocket for Cat6 cable. Then you can run along walls, poke through them to adjacent rooms, etc. I'd look to place switches ...


7

I came up w/ a 'cool trick' (I think so, at least). Get some of those strong, rectangular magnets.. Upstairs, on the edge of the wall, where you want the receptacle to be above, put the magnet on the floor and a heavy weight on it, so it won't move. Then, take some measurements to help you figure out where it'll be, when trying to find it from the other ...


6

Yes it's definitely possible. If you have carpeting you often can just push the wire under the baseboard in the gap left for the flooring. Otherwise the most common option is to remove the baseboards, and then cut out a strip of drywall at the bottom of the wall. You hide your wires in this channel, and then replace the baseboards. Make sure that when ...


6

NEC 334.30(B)(1) allows Nonmetallic-sheathed cable to be unsupported when fished though finished buildings or structures and supporting is impracticable. Answer provided by @Tester101 here as comment.


6

Not in the same conduit as 120 or 220 - 240VAC, no. Parallel to is no big deal, people who fuss over things that will generally have no effect do like to keep a foot/30cm between them, ideally, but in point of fact the signal design is such that interference between 50/60 Hz powerlines and 100+MHz network wiring is not really a problem.


5

Try using an 11b extension ring or a 1900 extension ring. Actually made to deepen a junction box, but should work for this application.


5

They don't care about cable bends. So you're fine. The limit on bends applies to conduit. The conduit must be built out before the wires are pulled through it. Experience is that if you try to pull through too many bends, the pulling forces become rather extreme, and start to cause injury/damage to the wires you are pulling. So they require ...


5

Well, the good news is it does not appear that you've passed into "throw it away" levels of twisted yet. I've had users do things to innocent cables that I can't quite believe. I find out about them when the cable fails, usually. Find a stairwell, or some other place you can let the cable dangle, hold, and wait. Since you probably don't have a 45m ...


5

Flat cable is going to have EMI issues (i.e. you'll see reduced bandwidth). Step back and consider, why is running a cable your best option? You may be better served by a wireless option. Adding WiFi to a desktop computer is relatively simple with a USB-WiFi adapter. If you need to connect multiple devices or something other than a PC then you can use a ...


4

Just use the existing wires with one of these. They are awesome; a bit pricey but it saves you ripping this out and then pulling cables, sweating like mad; cables getting snagged, maybe you need two or three... forget it! Power Ethernet Sockets You can also get the smaller, cheaper and less stylish ones. THey do the same job. Powerline Ethernet Adapter ...


4

As best one can see from that resolution those are twisted pair cables. The blue is probably a Cat5e or Cat6, for ethernet, and the yellow is probably Cat3/VG for phone. If you look closely you should see the rating on the jacket. If your area has or is scheduled to receive fiber-optic com utilities then some vendors (like FIOS) put the fiber terminal ...


4

All this "glorified medicine cabinet" talk is a little bit uncalled for. These are actually called "Structured Media Enclosures" by the manufacturers, and for many (most or virtually all) home networking and video distribution installations they're adequate. They do come in different sizes, too. And, you get your own Ethernet punchdown blocks and install ...


4

If there is no drywall on the ceiling, it qualifies as new work regardless of the advertised box type. The main reason cables get stapled in new work is to keep drywall screws (or the now-less-commonly-seen drywall nail) from penetrating the wiring. It's not really a concern in old work where the drywall is already in place – hence why the cable can be ...


4

Here are some suggestions. I've used all of these except the last one which I think would work pretty well. Locate a power socket as my reference point. You'll know it's there because you'll see the wires going up into the inside of the wall. Position your outlet on the outer wall since the outer wall is always known. Although, that might not be a good ...


4

Surface mount gutter if you want the wireway where the red box is would work. Wire mold also makes some listed wireways that look much nicer than standard gutter. Added per op comment, if there are taps in the wireway / gutter it must be accessible per NEC 378.56, but if just used like conduit it can be concealed the same as conduit. There are 2 main types ...


4

Make a couple of cable holders that are shaped like the picture shows. You can probably buy something like that for christmas light strings or extension cords. Wind about 41 m of the twisted cable onto one, and secure with a rubber band, or have someone hold it. Untwist the remaining length and wind onto the second, take-up holder, then secure with a rubber ...


4

NOT DUCT TAPE. Gaffer tape is not duct tape. "Gaffer tape" is NOT a regional word for duct tape. It's Not Duct Tape At All. Sadly, the secret is out, and the junkstream is awash with fake gaffer tape, basically relabeled duct tape. Real gaffer tape is made by Rosco, 3M or Permacel, and it doesn't sell in enough volume for there to be AmazonBasics ...


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