30

Cut an opening in the wall for a low voltage box/bracket,and install the bracket. Position a flexible drill bit into the hole, so that you'll drill straight through the bottom plate of the wall and into the crawlspace. This is a poor image since the guy is not drilling straight down, but you get the idea. Go into the crawlspace and attach the cable to the ...


24

Most likely this was a satellite dish hookup. Back in the 90s, when the technology was nascent, each box got its own LNB feed from the dish. You'd also need an antenna hookup to get local broadcasts (as in two separate cable feeds). The phone line was so the satellite box could phone the company and report whatever purchases were made via the remote (like ...


15

If you cross perpendicular to the power there will be no problems no matter how many cables you cross each cable basically cancels when perpendicular.


11

Measure carefully. There are usually plenty of reference points... duct vents plumbing, etc. Once you've done that, either drill a very small hole to feel for the wall's bottom plate, or run a long screw up through. An assistant on the floor above can help determine if you're off target and warn you. If you have absolutely no reference points, drive a ...


11

Here's the caveat with old coaxial cable. If this is an older house, it might have cable already, but it's probably RG-59. This is from back in the days of analog signals, well before we were sending digital signals down them. If you have a satellite dish, you'll note they need RG-6 or better. What's the difference? Shielding Now, it's possible there's no ...


10

Shopping They sell modular wall plates in 1 to 6 port flavors. Pick up as many as you need from the local home improvement store. Grab some F type modules, and some low voltage brackets while you're there. Installation Cut a hole in the wall large enough for the low voltage bracket to fit. Install the low voltage bracket. Shorten the lengths of cable, and ...


8

No, you cannot. Unless you're not covered by National Electrical Code (or similar), you don't care about following codes, or you're also installing a permanent barrier or listed divider. National Electrical Code Chapter 8 Communications Systems. Article 820 Community Antenna Television and Radio Distribution Systems. 820.133 Installation of ...


8

The first step is to cut the cable to length. You can use any tool capable of cutting the cable, personally I reach for my trusty lineman pliers. Once you cut the cable, it will look something like this Now that the cable is the proper length, you'll have to strip the insulation off. Again, you can use any tool capable of stripping the insulation without ...


8

It is likely a remnant from either the initial cable-pulling process, or that connected cable is an extension that was used to "move" the coax to that other point in the room that you mentioned. I would see what happens if you disconnect it - does the coax stop working somewhere else in your house? That's the surest way to find out what it is ...


8

That hole is a firecode violation. It should be air sealed around the penetrations - as it stands it is a chimney for a fire. As far as conduit to separate the low voltage wires from the line voltage - are you pulling one end back to get the conduit onto them? a staple and a zip tie to keep the wires to one side of the hole would probably work just as well....


7

I came up w/ a 'cool trick' (I think so, at least). Get some of those strong, rectangular magnets.. Upstairs, on the edge of the wall, where you want the receptacle to be above, put the magnet on the floor and a heavy weight on it, so it won't move. Then, take some measurements to help you figure out where it'll be, when trying to find it from the other ...


7

I don't think it matters all that much. I can't find a minimum operating temp for coax, but most wires tend to list -20C as their minimum, and that's mostly for bending reasons. So if it got hit in the middle of winter, maybe it might get damaged. Maybe... As far as weatherproof... What you have in your picture is the grounding block. I have plenty of coax ...


7

There's little point in having conduit that goes only part way. On the other hand, a continuous conduit path from attic to unfinished space in the basement is a tremendous asset when low-voltage renovations come up. Electrical conduit can't have tight bends (elbows) like what's used for plumbing because wires can't be easily or safely pulled through those. ...


6

The connectors shown in the image are "contemporary technology" and have sealing gaskets incorporated into the design. The tool used for applying the connectors ensures good sealing. The outer metal may corrode slightly but not sufficiently to impair performance. As the connectors are today's products, it's also likely that the cable is already RG-6. The ...


6

Living and working as a cable television technician in a beachside region, I can attest to the value of the silicone dielectric grease for improving the lifespan of these connections. Salt air eats everything in time, yet the grease prevented corrosion after five years. The fittings were assembled with "boots," rubber covers which resemble spark plug wiring ...


6

There's probably a gob of cable terminations in your basement or utility room. You'll need to find the two cables that go to the rooms involved (or simply place your modem there). With any luck they're labeled. Using a pass-through splicer, connect those two. You should now have a continuous route between rooms, and the only question is whether the ...


6

I'm curious if those are all bundled together into one cable in the wall? I have used cable that contained all 4 in one to simplify running it. Notice that the two coax are different colors so the person wanted to be able to tell the difference between them. To me this implies a separate CATV and Satellite line, but it also could be cable internet or ...


6

I get we all want smooth walls, but you really shouldn’t just cover up a splice box. While that is a less serious problem with data cable, it is absolutely essential it not be done with power cables, especially AC mains! The reason is that splices do fail (whereas cables in walls generally do not). You need to be able to access each end of the cable for ...


5

There might be many answers to this but as someone that had both satellite and cable tv in the past this could be the reason for 2 coax drops in each rooms. For the modular connection that looks like someone used a cat 5? Cable for phone. Using the 2-1 device ties the cables together and not all the conductors are used so that was possibly their way of doing ...


5

2 inch PVC is quite large for a few low-voltage cables (coax & cat6 or whatever.) Check in the electrical aisle of your home improvement store. You'll find GRAY CONDUIT that is specifically meant for electricity and data cabling. It comes in several smaller diameters. Mine stocks 10-foot and I think also 5-foot pieces. They come with one end of the ...


4

Honestly, a foot and a half is pretty decent working space, as miserable wiring goes. Nice dry attic .vs. grotty wet crawlspace, too. Lay out some boards if I need a floor that's not there, crawl over there and be done with it - would be my approach in that case. The general idea of drilling a hole and running a flexible rod through it works, so long as the ...


4

Here are some suggestions. I've used all of these except the last one which I think would work pretty well. Locate a power socket as my reference point. You'll know it's there because you'll see the wires going up into the inside of the wall. Position your outlet on the outer wall since the outer wall is always known. Although, that might not be a good ...


4

Do a search for "Intersystem Bonding". You should be able to find quite a few devices on the market, hopefully one of them suits your fancy. Basically, you'll install an intersystem bonding termination device (with at least 3 terminals) near the electrical service entrance. Then you'll bond the IBT back to the grounding electrode system, using a 6 AWG ...


4

The adapters you would look for are called MoCA (Multimedia over Coax Alliance) adapter kits, but they are not very common, and therefore can be expensive. Basically the MoCA adapter works like a modem that connects computers over a telephone line, but it uses Coax instead. Each computer needs an adapter, and the computer treats the adapter like any other ...


4

It's an antenna / satellite combiner. Appears to be an aftermarket add-on. It takes both LNB feeds from the dish, along with the antenna signal, and combines them onto one wire. In this case, it looks like it fed four boxes. Apparently this unit could combine them without a splitter on TV end. Either way, I wouldn't use it without a satellite dish. A ...


4

I'd slap up a 6" box, maybe PVC with threaded entries, and then use weathertight screw-in cable clamps to bring each data cable into the box. And I'd either glue and caulk the back of the box to the wall... or have conduit go through the wall from that box, and fill the rest of the hole. My concern is animals or insects using the hole as a superhighway....


4

ENT (electrical nonmetallic tubing) is one option if you have bends that you cannot accommodate with rigid PVC or EMT (electrical metallic tubing - the lightest grade of steel conduit.) ENT's a corrugated tubing plastic conduit that's quite flexible, so if you are pulling out the current wires so that you can run them or new wires in conduit, you should be ...


4

The small ISP market offers many products you'll find useful for this project. These are unfamiliar to consumers because these items aren't found on the shelves of the local electronics retailer. Some of them require above-average installation or configuration skills - but as a person who confidently uses terms like Ethernet, MoCA, and PoE you'll do fine. ...


3

Because you only hook up what you have to, to avoid signal loss. If you're serious about getting HD to all your jacks, you should probably look into getting a powered splitter. Otherwise, you just want a small passive splitter in a good MHz range. Over 2k was bare minimum last time I checked. I have internet cable and I want it as clean as possible, so I ...


3

Duct seal is commonly used to seal around cables through holes. Depending on what you're trying to accomplish, this might be a good choice for you.


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