44

You should really do a mitered return on that edge and terminate it into the wall. It will require a 45 cut in the opposite direction and a small piece, also cut at a 45 to fill the gap to the wall. Here is an example


27

Gary Bak's answer is good. You can also do an angled return if you wish to ease the transition a bit. This involves a 22-1/2° angle on the main piece, and one 22-1/2° and one 45° on the return piece. Watch your fingers! image source


18

It would be quick and easy to mask the shoe. Slide a roll of high-quality painter's tape along the baseboard, tight to it, while pressing the dispensed tape against the shoe. Run a finger wrapped in a thin towel along to press it tight. Pull the tape shortly after painting and scrape off any bleed with a soft (plastic or wood) tool while the paint is still ...


15

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more professional....


14

Any non-shrinking wood putty should do. Elmers, Minwax, and Durham's offer good products. You could also use a setting-type joint compound, such as Durabond.


11

That looks like MDF baseboard, which is very porous and will swell when it gets wet. It looks like there was a way for the water from your mopping to wick into the baseboard (likely a nick or cut in the factory finish). To repair the paint, you'll need to sand the swollen part down flush to the surface. If you find yourself having a hard time getting it ...


10

It's a balancing valve, and you have probably got the guts of it confused with excessive unscrewing. You may be able to sort them out if you undo the BIG nut and take them out. if not, a heating professional can. The purpose of this type of valve is to balance flow between heating loops, so it will also need to be re-adjusted once reassembled (or replaced.) ...


10

I see two options. What I see in the US quite a bit is instead of running the plastic channels on the wall surface, people will use steel conduit. It gives kind of a rustic/industrial look. Receptacles would then be mounted in steel boxes on the wall surface as well. What is typical in Germany, where most walls are block and plaster, is that grooves are cut ...


9

NEC 300.4(D) covers the type of installation indicated in the question, and it applies to both AC and MC armored cable. So you'll need to use a steel guard at least 1/16" thick to protect the cable. This tip from Fine Homebuilding illustrates this type of installation. Rather than backing the molding with steel plating, they use a U-shaped channel to ...


8

There needs to be a 1/4" gap next to all walls to allow the flooring room to expand. This gap should be covered with trim of some sort. The problem with baseboard alone, is that most baseboard is 3/8" thick, leaving only an 1/8" of an inch for the wood to contract without exposing the edge. This also assumes that the flooring is laid with tremendous ...


8

3/8-5/8" but most 1/2" Reasoning: you have padding and carpet. With a plush carpet and pad you might be at almost an inch or even over. you don't want the tuck to be so tight that it looks like the carpet is being smashed under the baseboards. The carpet should look like it is just flowing under. Note that most floors aren't exactly flat. So make sure ...


8

As for the gaps between the bottom of the base board (skirting) and the floor ... that is normally covered over with a base shoe molding. Base shoe is a small dimension molding that can be pressed down to fit the variations in the floor surface. Base shoe molding is normally only skipped when carpeting is going to be installed on the floor. A nice trick ...


7

For tiled bathroom floors I feel that nothing is better than tile for the floorboards. And if you are using tile on your floor than you can use tile on the base of the walls too. It can be done with the same type as the floor or something different like the glass tiles used as kitchen backsplash. Prep the sheet rock surface properly, seal if needed so ...


7

Real wood. Poplar trim is what I use for bathrooms or basements. It is hard and holds up to moisture well. If you get the plastic stuff it will look like... plastic. It would have to really be in modern room or business setting to look right. I would suggest getting poplar (pine is cheap and has moisture bulging issues) or some other hard wood. Give it ...


7

The step are: Sand pre-primed trim Install trim Putty nail holes and caulk top of trim and any other place at the edge of the wood. Window stops, quarter round, casing, door stops . The only exception is where the floor meets the base. Sand out putty. If you spray the trim, tape off all windows. Paint trim. If brushed, add paint additive Floetrol to reduce ...


7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


7

Painted white is cheap. That's really all there is to it, no reason you can't do it differently, and you can find plenty of non-white baseboards in the states - but a preponderance of Florida housing is mass-built developments that are going to run towards cheap and standardized. Wood is common in older houses, but once some idiot decides to paint it, it ...


6

If by HMA you mean Hot-Melt Adhesive, that stuff is for arts & crafts, not construction. You should be using construction adhesive. LOCTITE®, LIQUID NAILS®, DAP®, and possibly other adhesive manufacturers offer a molding adhesive.


6

Yes it's definitely possible. If you have carpeting you often can just push the wire under the baseboard in the gap left for the flooring. Otherwise the most common option is to remove the baseboards, and then cut out a strip of drywall at the bottom of the wall. You hide your wires in this channel, and then replace the baseboards. Make sure that when ...


6

If you are renovating the whole house, or at least a good portion of it, I would purchase a nail gun over renting it or borrowing it. Owning it lets you use it when you need it, not like going to get a rental and returning it or being responsible for somebody elses' property. Get the compressor too, it does more than power nailers, it fills tires, blows dust ...


6

It is called a miter drop. Check Instagram or the web or a good trim carpentry book. It's not as complex as it looks and it is the right way to do it. The person whose image this is has many versions shown on his page including wrapping around a corner and is an amazing carpenter.


5

The main reason the recess is in the back of all moldings is to "thin" the wood, reducing the amount of continuous rings in the wood that helps control cupping. There is a fringe benefit of that relief in the back of trim, it helps get past some irregularities in the wall. I have had more problems with that relief cut than benefits when it come to base. The ...


5

I don't think that's a very good idea. First of all, the wood is already sealed, so the paint isn't going to adhere very well. Second, you're going to waste a lot of money by purchasing nice grainy oak baseboard, since you're paying for the color and grain that are going to be covered up by paint. You can save a dollar per linear foot or more by going with ...


5

I usually use a pair of end cutting pliers, to pull the nails out the back. The face of the tool is slightly rounded, which allows for a good rocking motion. Just grab the nail gently with the pliers, as close to the work piece as possible. Rocking the tool on it's rounded face generates quite a bit of leverage, allowing you to pull most nails out. Just ...


5

Caulk is a bad choice, because it can't be sanded. You can't get it perfectly even with the flat surface, because it stick to everything it touches. You will end up with a slightly raised area around the hole, and it will show more readily than putty, because caulk has such a different consistency. And, yes, caulk will shrink just like putty, but unlike ...


5

MDF may be marginally more stable, but in my extensive experience it's far too fragile to be used for house trim. I wouldn't install it if it was free. It dents and scratches like nothing. If you're doing a typical bedroom you shouldn't have field joints, as either is available in 16-foot lengths. Even if you do, a well-glued and well-nailed miter won't ...


5

Likely a false economy. You might spend $200 or more on tools for the job...router bits are not cheap, and neither is a good router (though the cost of bits soon exceeds the cost of the router, be it good or cheap.) My ballpark guess on "how that was done" (or could, most inexpensively, be done) is 5 saw cuts on a tablesaw and then cutting 3 edges with a ...


5

The issue is that normally, moldings around a door are very different from baseboard molding. You can easily bevel two identical moldings together; you can't do the same if the profiles are different. Of course, this begs the question: why are door moldings different from baseboard moldings? Well, mainly tradition; that's the way it's usually been. Lee Sam'...


5

Thanks for clarifying your motivation behind asking. If your goal was to learn a universal nomenclature of moldings, I was bringing bad news: My 25 years of directly related experience has uncovered no such uniformity. The only way to clearly and universally designate moldings is by function.size, and description of profile. For less common items and large ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible