44

You should really do a mitered return on that edge and terminate it into the wall. It will require a 45 cut in the opposite direction and a small piece, also cut at a 45 to fill the gap to the wall. Here is an example


30

Pretty easy DIY job. All you'll need is: a hammer, old metal putty knife, utility knife, small pry bar, pliers, and a pencil. For reinstallation, a finish nail gun really makes the job go fast, and a nail set is also useful. The typical procedure: Cut away any caulk on the top edge and corners. Check any inside corners to see if they are coped rather than ...


27

Gary Bak's answer is good. You can also do an angled return if you wish to ease the transition a bit. This involves a 22-1/2° angle on the main piece, and one 22-1/2° and one 45° on the return piece. Watch your fingers! image source


18

It would be quick and easy to mask the shoe. Slide a roll of high-quality painter's tape along the baseboard, tight to it, while pressing the dispensed tape against the shoe. Run a finger wrapped in a thin towel along to press it tight. Pull the tape shortly after painting and scrape off any bleed with a soft (plastic or wood) tool while the paint is still ...


16

I use a painters multi tool to pry loose baseboards. Its wider and thickeer than a putty knife. It also has a hard place on the end of the handle where its meant to be tapped with a hammer. I find it pretty handy.


15

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more professional....


14

Any non-shrinking wood putty should do. Elmers, Minwax, and Durham's offer good products. You could also use a setting-type joint compound, such as Durabond.


12

Dimensions on your photo would help make a better model, but here is what I might do in this situation. The easy way End the upper trim with a bevel (30-45°) at the edge of the stair, then continue in the lower room as normal. Transition You may want to use a transition piece to pull the pieces together. You could even cut an angle into the top of ...


11

We usually tack the baseboard in place with one nail at each side, and then find the studs with a stud sensor, marking on the baseboard as we go. Alternately, I would think that every 12 inches would be sufficient. We also caulk the top of the baseboards with paintable latex caulk (which helps with dusting later), and that helps hold the baseboard to the ...


11

When copper oxidizes, it first turns dark brown (like a copper penny), and then if left undisturbed into a somewhat moldy-looking green. This is normal. If you notice the pipe starting to deteriorate around areas that have a lot of green, this may indicate a leak in the pipe that is introducing more water into the area, speeding oxidation. Just keep an eye ...


11

My two cents worth..... We always install the base trim and door trim first. If you have split jam doors with the casings already attached, you must install them first or you will have a real problem fitting the jams to the floor between rooms. As mentioned, sometimes the carpet installers can scratch the finish on the baseboards, however it is usually ...


11

It makes it easier for the carpet installer because they don't have the baseboards in the way when they're nailing in the tack strips next to the wall. On the other hand, it makes things a little more difficult to install the baseboard later because the carpet and tack strips are in the way when you're trying to nail the baseboard to the sole plate in the ...


11

That looks like MDF baseboard, which is very porous and will swell when it gets wet. It looks like there was a way for the water from your mopping to wick into the baseboard (likely a nick or cut in the factory finish). To repair the paint, you'll need to sand the swollen part down flush to the surface. If you find yourself having a hard time getting it ...


10

We had an almost identical situation in a former garage that we refinished to be an office. Our contractor suggested this and we liked the result: he installed a piece of wood about an inch out from the concrete, putting insulation between them and keeping the wood a consistent and level height - a little higher than the concrete. I can't remember if it was ...


10

A metal escutcheon ring might be sufficient for your purpose. I would fill the hole with steel wool to stop the mice, then cover with silicone to prevent a draft. The steel wool might be unnecessary, as I don't think mice will gnaw though silicone. However, if the hole is large, the steel wool would make it easier to fill it with silicone without having it ...


10

It's a balancing valve, and you have probably got the guts of it confused with excessive unscrewing. You may be able to sort them out if you undo the BIG nut and take them out. if not, a heating professional can. The purpose of this type of valve is to balance flow between heating loops, so it will also need to be re-adjusted once reassembled (or replaced.) ...


8

I would use a plastic or metal escutcheon as suggested by others, however I would make sure that the escutcheon did not fit up tightly to the sides of the pipe. That is to say, leave a small gap of about 1/8 of an inch between the inside of the escutcheon and the outside of the pipe. You can use silicon to secure the escutcheon to the floor. The reason for ...


8

There needs to be a 1/4" gap next to all walls to allow the flooring room to expand. This gap should be covered with trim of some sort. The problem with baseboard alone, is that most baseboard is 3/8" thick, leaving only an 1/8" of an inch for the wood to contract without exposing the edge. This also assumes that the flooring is laid with tremendous ...


8

3/8-5/8" but most 1/2" Reasoning: you have padding and carpet. With a plush carpet and pad you might be at almost an inch or even over. you don't want the tuck to be so tight that it looks like the carpet is being smashed under the baseboards. The carpet should look like it is just flowing under. Note that most floors aren't exactly flat. So make sure ...


8

As for the gaps between the bottom of the base board (skirting) and the floor ... that is normally covered over with a base shoe molding. Base shoe is a small dimension molding that can be pressed down to fit the variations in the floor surface. Base shoe molding is normally only skipped when carpeting is going to be installed on the floor. A nice trick ...


7

Real wood. Poplar trim is what I use for bathrooms or basements. It is hard and holds up to moisture well. If you get the plastic stuff it will look like... plastic. It would have to really be in modern room or business setting to look right. I would suggest getting poplar (pine is cheap and has moisture bulging issues) or some other hard wood. Give it ...


7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


6

Do you have space to install a floor flange trim plate? These should be available in a variety of sizes, so you should be able to find one designed to fit around your pipe's OD. They are made from different materials and different shapes (plastic versions should be way cheaper than $10). It should look something like this:


6

The step are: Sand pre-primed trim Install trim Putty nail holes and caulk top of trim and any other place at the edge of the wood. Window stops, quarter round, casing, door stops . The only exception is where the floor meets the base. Sand out putty. If you spray the trim, tape off all windows. Paint trim. If brushed, add paint additive Floetrol to reduce ...


6

If by HMA you mean Hot-Melt Adhesive, that stuff is for arts & crafts, not construction. You should be using construction adhesive. LOCTITE®, LIQUID NAILS®, DAP®, and possibly other adhesive manufacturers offer a molding adhesive.


6

If you are renovating the whole house, or at least a good portion of it, I would purchase a nail gun over renting it or borrowing it. Owning it lets you use it when you need it, not like going to get a rental and returning it or being responsible for somebody elses' property. Get the compressor too, it does more than power nailers, it fills tires, blows dust ...


6

NEC 300.4(D) covers the type of installation indicated in the question, and it applies to both AC and MC armored cable. So you'll need to use a steel guard at least 1/16" thick to protect the cable. This tip from Fine Homebuilding illustrates this type of installation. Rather than backing the molding with steel plating, they use a U-shaped channel to ...


5

Have you thought about maybe just building a bench around the room to encase the concrete ledge? I'm not sure what the intended use of the room is, but a bench might be neat for a play room or entertainment room.


5

I like these: They're about $10, and are very useful for finicky "demolition" work where you want to preserve the materials.


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